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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | March 8, 2004
Like a boulder teetering on a hillside above Wile E. Coyote's head in a Road Runner cartoon, an enormous metal ball is poised above customers' heads at the car rental center at Baltimore-Washington International Airport. The gleaming sphere, six feet in diameter and perched 20 feet overhead on steel arcs that run the length of the building, looks as if it were gathering the momentum to skitter back up toward the ceiling. Commissioned by the Maryland Aviation Administration, the piece is called Momentum Study.
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SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
The Orioles were without first- and second-round draft picks this year, but that didn't stop Gary Rajsich , the club's director of scouting, from being excited about his new crop of players, including the three pitchers he introduced to the media and fans Thursday before the game against the Toronto Blue Jays at Camden Yards. "We're always looking for athletic throwers, guys that throw hard, guys that have good deliveries and good upside. And I think this year we came away with three really good ones," said Rajsich, who was in his third draft with the organization.
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FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1999
David Hess originally had a live-action Roadrunner film in mind. Thankfully, he ended-up instead with a wryly insightful documentary into what makes a man do what common sense tells him not to."The Green Monster," airing at 10 p.m. tomorrow on MPT, Channels 22 and 67, as part of PBS's "P.O.V." documentary series, relates the tale of Art Arfons, a 74-year-old Midwesterner who's spent his adult life setting land-speed records in cars he designed and built himself. The film uses as its centerpiece Arfons' 1991 attempt to once again become the fastest man on wheels.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | December 17, 2006
YOU MAY KNOW BOB AND MIKE BRYAN AS THE world's No. 1-ranked doubles team in tennis. But, who knew that they were dynamite on keyboards, guitar and drums in their own Bryan Brothers rock band? Just ask any of the gang -- like Baltimore CEO Club president Doug Strouse, tennis champions Andrea Leand and Elise Burgin, Baltimore Tennis Patrons board member Gail Hagerty and tennis teaching pro Ronald Scott. They were all at the Rock-n-Racquets Reception and Auction shindig that Baltimore-born tennis champ Pam Shriver throws every year, the night before her annual Mercantile Tennis Challenge.
NEWS
October 15, 1999
The opening for the Goya-Girl Press art exhibit listed in yesterday's Live section has been delayed until Oct. 23 from 5: 30 p.m. to 7: 30 p.m. at Mill Centre Studio, Suite 214, 3000 Chestnut Ave. The exhibit, featuring works by David Hess, Allyn Massey and Madeleine Keesing, will run through Nov. 20. Call 410-366-2001 for information.
FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris | November 10, 1991
One look at David Hess' chair -- a sort of lounge chair made out of an old farm plow, a metal frame and some copper strips -- and you know it's making a statement. Maybe it's saying something about how we look at things, maybe something about the intrinsic value of what we throw away, maybe something about seeing things in new ways in a new aesthetic context, maybe . . ."I don't want to get too philosophical here," he says. "I just pick something up and I'm struck with it and then I start from there."
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2003
David Hess was among a group of teen-agers who went to a Taneytown City Council meeting in 1993 to ask for a skate park. He failed in that mission. But now his father, Councilman Richard L. Hess Jr., chairs the council's recreation and parks committee, and the city council will decide whether the old Taneytown High School site would be a good spot for a skate park. Taneytown Mayor W. Robert Flickinger talked about a skate park before his election in May, and earlier this month, the city council voted unanimously in favor of building one. The city has about $33,000 from Program Open Space available for the project.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | November 14, 1991
At Galerie Francoise, a Leonard Streckfus dog called "Mixed Breed" has a body made of wooden chair parts, a metal head that used to be an electric fan base and floppy ears that were once high-heeled shoe soles. "Mixed Breed" stands on a David Hess bed called "Tune Banging," with the metal harp of a piano as the headboard and bowling ball feet.Galerie Francoise has just moved to new, smaller quarters across the courtyard at Green Spring Station from its original location, and the space's inaugural exhibit is so much fun it will lift your spirits and send you away determined to return again and again.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | December 11, 1993
To the untrained eye, it's junk. Rusted bikes. Old bowling balls. Warped barn doors. Don't try convincing David Hess and David Klein of that, though. The two furniture makers comb the city in pick-up trucks rescuing such debris.In their Hampden studios, they turn it into art.Oak wainscoting from a church becomes a cabinet. Riggings from a conveyor are reworked into a four-poster bed. A piano harp lives again as a headboard."We're urban scavengers," Mr. Klein, 50, says simply."Yeah," adds Mr. Hess, 29, "we do a lot of alley cruising.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2003
David Hess was among a group of teen-agers that went to a Taneytown city council meeting in 1993 to ask for a skate park. He failed in that mission. But now his father, Councilman Richard L. Hess Jr., chairs the council's recreation and parks committee, and the city council will decide whether the old Taneytown High School site would be a good spot for a skate park. Taneytown Mayor W. Robert Flickinger talked about a skate park before his election in May, and earlier this month, the city council voted unanimously in favor of building one. The city has about $33,000 from Program Open Space available for the project.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | March 8, 2004
Like a boulder teetering on a hillside above Wile E. Coyote's head in a Road Runner cartoon, an enormous metal ball is poised above customers' heads at the car rental center at Baltimore-Washington International Airport. The gleaming sphere, six feet in diameter and perched 20 feet overhead on steel arcs that run the length of the building, looks as if it were gathering the momentum to skitter back up toward the ceiling. Commissioned by the Maryland Aviation Administration, the piece is called Momentum Study.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2003
David Hess was among a group of teen-agers that went to a Taneytown city council meeting in 1993 to ask for a skate park. He failed in that mission. But now his father, Councilman Richard L. Hess Jr., chairs the council's recreation and parks committee, and the city council will decide whether the old Taneytown High School site would be a good spot for a skate park. Taneytown Mayor W. Robert Flickinger talked about a skate park before his election in May, and earlier this month, the city council voted unanimously in favor of building one. The city has about $33,000 from Program Open Space available for the project.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2003
David Hess was among a group of teen-agers who went to a Taneytown City Council meeting in 1993 to ask for a skate park. He failed in that mission. But now his father, Councilman Richard L. Hess Jr., chairs the council's recreation and parks committee, and the city council will decide whether the old Taneytown High School site would be a good spot for a skate park. Taneytown Mayor W. Robert Flickinger talked about a skate park before his election in May, and earlier this month, the city council voted unanimously in favor of building one. The city has about $33,000 from Program Open Space available for the project.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to the Sun | October 19, 2003
Has life been a bit too humdrum lately? Then you should'a been at the American Visionary Art Museum's party to open its new exhibit, Golden Blessings of Old Age / Out of the Mouths of Babes. You can always count on AVAM and its founder / director, Re- becca Hoffberger, to inspire a whiz-bang shebang. Among the highlights of the evening was a performance by Sixty Karats. "They were these fantastic dancers who do June Taylor-type dancing," Rebecca says. "All eight of them are in their 70s and 80s. And they were really professional."
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2003
After the opening song played on kazoos and a blessing of the feet, which involved people lying in front of the American Visionary Art Museum with their legs in the air, a yellow duck made of milk cartons and a 14-foot pink poodle named Fifi made their way to the Inner Harbor. As if John Waters was hallucinating it, a papier-mache teapot slid down the boat ramp in Canton. An elephant made of 2,000 plastic, powder-blue pom-poms with a pantyhose Buddha trudged through a sand pit at Patterson Park.
NEWS
October 15, 1999
The opening for the Goya-Girl Press art exhibit listed in yesterday's Live section has been delayed until Oct. 23 from 5: 30 p.m. to 7: 30 p.m. at Mill Centre Studio, Suite 214, 3000 Chestnut Ave. The exhibit, featuring works by David Hess, Allyn Massey and Madeleine Keesing, will run through Nov. 20. Call 410-366-2001 for information.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | December 17, 2006
YOU MAY KNOW BOB AND MIKE BRYAN AS THE world's No. 1-ranked doubles team in tennis. But, who knew that they were dynamite on keyboards, guitar and drums in their own Bryan Brothers rock band? Just ask any of the gang -- like Baltimore CEO Club president Doug Strouse, tennis champions Andrea Leand and Elise Burgin, Baltimore Tennis Patrons board member Gail Hagerty and tennis teaching pro Ronald Scott. They were all at the Rock-n-Racquets Reception and Auction shindig that Baltimore-born tennis champ Pam Shriver throws every year, the night before her annual Mercantile Tennis Challenge.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2003
After the opening song played on kazoos and a blessing of the feet, which involved people lying in front of the American Visionary Art Museum with their legs in the air, a yellow duck made of milk cartons and a 14-foot pink poodle named Fifi made their way to the Inner Harbor. As if John Waters was hallucinating it, a papier-mache teapot slid down the boat ramp in Canton. An elephant made of 2,000 plastic, powder-blue pom-poms with a pantyhose Buddha trudged through a sand pit at Patterson Park.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1999
David Hess originally had a live-action Roadrunner film in mind. Thankfully, he ended-up instead with a wryly insightful documentary into what makes a man do what common sense tells him not to."The Green Monster," airing at 10 p.m. tomorrow on MPT, Channels 22 and 67, as part of PBS's "P.O.V." documentary series, relates the tale of Art Arfons, a 74-year-old Midwesterner who's spent his adult life setting land-speed records in cars he designed and built himself. The film uses as its centerpiece Arfons' 1991 attempt to once again become the fastest man on wheels.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | December 11, 1993
To the untrained eye, it's junk. Rusted bikes. Old bowling balls. Warped barn doors. Don't try convincing David Hess and David Klein of that, though. The two furniture makers comb the city in pick-up trucks rescuing such debris.In their Hampden studios, they turn it into art.Oak wainscoting from a church becomes a cabinet. Riggings from a conveyor are reworked into a four-poster bed. A piano harp lives again as a headboard."We're urban scavengers," Mr. Klein, 50, says simply."Yeah," adds Mr. Hess, 29, "we do a lot of alley cruising.
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