Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDavid Hayden
IN THE NEWS

David Hayden

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | November 18, 1992
Joanne Hayden taught her fourth-grade class at Timber Grove Elementary School in Reisterstown as usual on Monday.But when her husband, David, called her from Lexington, Ky., at 1 p.m., she became speechless.In the world's toughest marketplace among the glitziest purveyors of pedigreed horseflesh, the Haydens had just pulled off a coup reminiscent of the mid-1980s boom times.The Maryland couple had just sold a 6-month-old filly, which they had foaled and raised on their 80-acre farm in Upperco, in northern Baltimore County, for $330,000.
ARTICLES BY DATE
EXPLORE
July 19, 2013
On Monday, July 8, a group of 15 seniors from Conowingo, Rising Sun and Port Deposit traveled to Baltimore to visit the Ronald McDonald House on Lexington Street. The group, formed in 2006, meets every Monday morning - rain or shine - at the Rising Sun McDonald's to play bingo. The players pay $1 per card and they play for two hours, from 9 a.m. until 11 a.m. each Monday. Current chief, Susie Pruitt, collects the money each week and when the tally reaches $300, Susie sends a check down to the Baltimore Ronald McDonald House.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By TOM KEYSER | March 30, 2003
When terror rained down on the United States on Sept. 11, 2001, a horse sale was under way in Kentucky. A Maryland-bred yearling colt from the first crop of Partner's Hero, a young Maryland sire, was one of the offerings. JoAnn and David Hayden, owners of Dark Hollow Farm in Upperco, and Bill Beatson, an Annapolis real-estate developer, made the mistake, which they freely admit, of trying to sell in Kentucky a Maryland-bred yearling by a first-year, non-Kentucky sire. There was "zero interest" in the colt, David Hayden said.
SPORTS
By Zach Helfand, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2012
Other trainers and owners, Bill Beatson said, took a look at the Alfred G. Vanderbilt Handicap, saw the name "Shackleford" and passed. Even Beatson, and his partners at Dark Hollow Farms, David and JoAnn Hayden, knew that a win against the 2011 Preakness winner would be unlikely. They decided to enter the horse, Poseidon's Warrior, anyway, and so on Sunday the Maryland-bred horse was at the gate of an off track at the grade I race at Saratoga. His odds were 36-1, the second longest shot in the field.
EXPLORE
July 19, 2013
On Monday, July 8, a group of 15 seniors from Conowingo, Rising Sun and Port Deposit traveled to Baltimore to visit the Ronald McDonald House on Lexington Street. The group, formed in 2006, meets every Monday morning - rain or shine - at the Rising Sun McDonald's to play bingo. The players pay $1 per card and they play for two hours, from 9 a.m. until 11 a.m. each Monday. Current chief, Susie Pruitt, collects the money each week and when the tally reaches $300, Susie sends a check down to the Baltimore Ronald McDonald House.
SPORTS
By TOM KEYSER | April 4, 2004
Congratulatory calls began pouring in as soon as the Maryland-bred Our New Recruit won the Dubai Golden Shaheen last weekend in the Middle East. Tom Graul, breeder of the horse, appreciated the sentiment, knowing full well it's not every day you breed the winner of a $2 million race. But he also knew the reality of the situation. He wasn't going to benefit financially from the victory. Graul, 57, owns Graul's Market in Hereford. He lives in Hunt Valley. He owned the mare Delta Danielle when she gave birth five years ago to Our New Recruit.
SPORTS
By Zach Helfand, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2012
Other trainers and owners, Bill Beatson said, took a look at the Alfred G. Vanderbilt Handicap, saw the name "Shackleford" and passed. Even Beatson, and his partners at Dark Hollow Farms, David and JoAnn Hayden, knew that a win against the 2011 Preakness winner would be unlikely. They decided to enter the horse, Poseidon's Warrior, anyway, and so on Sunday the Maryland-bred horse was at the gate of an off track at the grade I race at Saratoga. His odds were 36-1, the second longest shot in the field.
FEATURES
By Karin Remesch | October 25, 1998
Mission: To educate promising and talented artists and designers and to serve as a cultural resource to the community. The institute's artists-in-residence program, public lectures and extensive exhibition schedule are important components of Baltimore's arts landscape. Exhibition spaces include the Decker Gallery, Mount Royal Station; the Meyerhoff Gallery, Fox Building; and the new Pinkard Gallery, Bunting Center. All exhibitions are open to the public free of charge.Latest accomplishment: All major galleries are currently dedicated to "20/XX," an invitational exhibition of works by alumni from the last 20 years, which honors Fred Lazarus' 20th anniversary as president of the Maryland Institute.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1999
After their bizarre encounter at Pimlico on Preakness day, Artax and Lee Chang Ferrell will soon re-enter the spotlight: Artax as the possible favorite in the Breeders' Cup Sprint Nov. 6 at Gulfstream Park, and Ferrell as the defendant at his trial 11 days later in Baltimore Circuit Court.When Ferrell walked onto the track May 15 during the finish of the Maryland Breeders' Cup Handicap -- three races before the Preakness -- he triggered one of the stranger episodes in racing history. As eight thoroughbreds thundered toward him, he stood his ground, clenched his fists and threw a wild punch at one of the horses: Artax.
NEWS
February 8, 2006
On February 5, 2006, JOHN EDMUND MAJOR, beloved husband of Deborah Lee Major (nee Godwin), dear son of Joseph A. and the late Rose V. Major, father of Farrah and husband James Connelly, Lindsay and fiance James R. Ringgold, Jr., brother of Jo Ann and husband David Hayden, beloved grandfather of Brendan Richard and Jonathan Major Connelly. A celebration of John's life will be held on Wednesday February 8 at 11 A.M. at Bishop Cummins Memorial Church, 2001 Frederick Rd, Catonsville. Contributions can be made to the National MS Society, 11403 Cronhill Drive Suite E, Owings Mills, Maryland 21117 or Trinity School, 4985 Ilchester Road, 21041.
SPORTS
By TOM KEYSER | April 4, 2004
Congratulatory calls began pouring in as soon as the Maryland-bred Our New Recruit won the Dubai Golden Shaheen last weekend in the Middle East. Tom Graul, breeder of the horse, appreciated the sentiment, knowing full well it's not every day you breed the winner of a $2 million race. But he also knew the reality of the situation. He wasn't going to benefit financially from the victory. Graul, 57, owns Graul's Market in Hereford. He lives in Hunt Valley. He owned the mare Delta Danielle when she gave birth five years ago to Our New Recruit.
SPORTS
By TOM KEYSER | March 30, 2003
When terror rained down on the United States on Sept. 11, 2001, a horse sale was under way in Kentucky. A Maryland-bred yearling colt from the first crop of Partner's Hero, a young Maryland sire, was one of the offerings. JoAnn and David Hayden, owners of Dark Hollow Farm in Upperco, and Bill Beatson, an Annapolis real-estate developer, made the mistake, which they freely admit, of trying to sell in Kentucky a Maryland-bred yearling by a first-year, non-Kentucky sire. There was "zero interest" in the colt, David Hayden said.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1999
After their bizarre encounter at Pimlico on Preakness day, Artax and Lee Chang Ferrell will soon re-enter the spotlight: Artax as the possible favorite in the Breeders' Cup Sprint Nov. 6 at Gulfstream Park, and Ferrell as the defendant at his trial 11 days later in Baltimore Circuit Court.When Ferrell walked onto the track May 15 during the finish of the Maryland Breeders' Cup Handicap -- three races before the Preakness -- he triggered one of the stranger episodes in racing history. As eight thoroughbreds thundered toward him, he stood his ground, clenched his fists and threw a wild punch at one of the horses: Artax.
FEATURES
By Karin Remesch | October 25, 1998
Mission: To educate promising and talented artists and designers and to serve as a cultural resource to the community. The institute's artists-in-residence program, public lectures and extensive exhibition schedule are important components of Baltimore's arts landscape. Exhibition spaces include the Decker Gallery, Mount Royal Station; the Meyerhoff Gallery, Fox Building; and the new Pinkard Gallery, Bunting Center. All exhibitions are open to the public free of charge.Latest accomplishment: All major galleries are currently dedicated to "20/XX," an invitational exhibition of works by alumni from the last 20 years, which honors Fred Lazarus' 20th anniversary as president of the Maryland Institute.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | November 18, 1992
Joanne Hayden taught her fourth-grade class at Timber Grove Elementary School in Reisterstown as usual on Monday.But when her husband, David, called her from Lexington, Ky., at 1 p.m., she became speechless.In the world's toughest marketplace among the glitziest purveyors of pedigreed horseflesh, the Haydens had just pulled off a coup reminiscent of the mid-1980s boom times.The Maryland couple had just sold a 6-month-old filly, which they had foaled and raised on their 80-acre farm in Upperco, in northern Baltimore County, for $330,000.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord | July 21, 1993
There was not much of a markup when the Maryland-bred half-sister to $2 million earner Safely Kept sold at the Keeneland (Ky.) sales on Monday.Baltimore county breeder David Hayden originally sold the Dayjur-Safely Home filly as a weanling last fall for $330,000 to William O. Reed. When Reed re-sold her Monday, she brought $350,000.The purchasers were Robert and Beverly Lewis of Pomona, Calif. A Keeneland spokesman said the Lewises are clients of trainer D. Wayne Lukas.One other Maryland-bred was sold during the first three of the four sessions.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.