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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 19, 1997
David Hare's "Racing Demon" establishes its central debate almost immediately with a scene in which the Bishop of Southwark warns the Rev. Lionel Espy that parishioners have begun to doubt Lionel's convictions.But while Lionel may have doubts about God, Ralph Piersanti's gentle, low-keyed portrayal at Theatre Hopkins makes it clear that he does have convictions -- they're just different from those of the bishop and, by extension, the Church of England.Imbued with humility, Piersanti's Lionel is a concerned cleric who believes the rituals of the church are no longer relevant to most of his working class South London parishioners.
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By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2001
Surviving in a time of war takes great courage, tenacity and luck. Surviving in a time of peace and plenty can take even more. In bits and flashes, David Hare's ironically titled Plenty demonstrates why some veterans find readjustment to society so difficult. A battleground provides a clarity and a focus, a sharply defined sense of purpose rarely found in the rest of life. Goals are unambiguous. Emotions are heightened, and so are the bonds between people. Everyone else is either friend or foe, hero or coward, and the difference is immediately discernible.
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By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2001
Surviving in a time of war takes great courage, tenacity and luck. Surviving in a time of peace and plenty can take even more. In bits and flashes, David Hare's ironically titled Plenty demonstrates why some veterans find readjustment to society so difficult. A battleground provides a clarity and a focus, a sharply defined sense of purpose rarely found in the rest of life. Goals are unambiguous. Emotions are heightened, and so are the bonds between people. Everyone else is either friend or foe, hero or coward, and the difference is immediately discernible.
NEWS
July 22, 2001
Noah's Ark rescued by generous supporters Slightly over a month ago, the future of our beloved Noah's Ark Wildlife Center that provides for the rehabilitation of injured and orphaned wildlife looked hopeless. However, thanks to an outpouring of support by county government, local media and citizens, in late July, Noah's Ark will locate to a new leased facility on the Broadneck peninsula at 580 Broadneck Road, Annapolis, Maryland 21401 (phone 410- 626-7700). We have no words strong enough to thank everyone for all they have done and continue to do. Our new home would never have happened without the help of County Executive Janet Owens, members of her staff, County Council Chairwoman Shirley Murphy, Councilwoman Cathleen Vitale and members of the County Council.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 8, 2001
The hero's fall from grace has been the stuff of tragedy since the Greeks invented the genre 2,500 years ago. And in the literary realm, no one has fallen faster and further - or with greater notoriety attached - than Oscar Wilde, the Irish-born playwright, novelist and poet. Wilde's homosexual affair with the son of a member of Britain's House of Lords scandalized Victorian London, and resulted in a sensational libel trial in which the author's revelations on the witness stand led to his arrest for sodomy and a humiliating prison term that broke his spirit as an artist and a man. Two gut-wrenching scenes from this sad, tacky, hypocrisy-laden affair provide grist for the dramatic mill in "The Judas Kiss," the David Hare play making its Washington-Baltimore area debut at Rep Stage in Columbia.
NEWS
July 22, 2001
Noah's Ark rescued by generous supporters Slightly over a month ago, the future of our beloved Noah's Ark Wildlife Center that provides for the rehabilitation of injured and orphaned wildlife looked hopeless. However, thanks to an outpouring of support by county government, local media and citizens, in late July, Noah's Ark will locate to a new leased facility on the Broadneck peninsula at 580 Broadneck Road, Annapolis, Maryland 21401 (phone 410- 626-7700). We have no words strong enough to thank everyone for all they have done and continue to do. Our new home would never have happened without the help of County Executive Janet Owens, members of her staff, County Council Chairwoman Shirley Murphy, Councilwoman Cathleen Vitale and members of the County Council.
NEWS
By Donna Weaver and Donna Weaver,Staff writer | September 16, 1991
Pasadena portrait photographer David Hare is questioning why all 12 county high schools have selected the same Baltimore photography studio to take yearbook photos.Hare claims that Segall-Majestic holdsa monopoly on the county yearbook photography market, and he thinks it's unfair."This policy constitutes a closed shop," said Hare, owner of David Hare Photographers. "There should be freedom of choice. Students should have a right to choose their photographer."The photographer blames school officials for failing to set clear guidelines regardingyearbook photography, allowing schools to select their own photographers.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | January 25, 1999
The central question about the former lovers at the core of David Hare's "Skylight" isn't just whether they'll get back together, but how they connected in the first place.In director Barry Feinstein's production at Fell's Point Corner Theatre, Mark E. Campion plays rich chauvinist Tom Sergeant, a successful restaurateur whose elitism fits him as comfortably as his very proper business suit.For years, Tom had an affair with Kyra Hollis, a young employee who lived in his home, alongside his wife and two children.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | January 17, 2000
Every now and then a show comes along that has more drama surrounding it than there is on stage. David Hare's "The Blue Room," receiving its Baltimore premiere at the Spotlighters Theatre, is a prime example. I wouldn't go so far as to call it a case of the emperor's new clothes, tempting as that might be since the show has a generous display of nudity. The nudity, however, is the cause of all the attention. In London and New York, where Nicole Kidman appeared in the buff, "The Blue Room" not only made headlines and magazine covers, it became one of the hottest tickets on two continents.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
The theater scene in Washington during this frigid winter has been pretty hot. The latest example is "Mother Courage and Her Children," the classic Bertolt Brecht play in a potent revival at Arena Stage starring Kathleen Turner. Director Molly Smith, who guides this atmospheric, in-the-round production with a sure hand, has said she wanted to remind people of the "Her Children" in the title so that Brecht's searing anti-war, anti-hypocrisy sentiments are not the only take-homes. That goal has been realized, thanks to Turner's rich portrayal.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 8, 2001
The hero's fall from grace has been the stuff of tragedy since the Greeks invented the genre 2,500 years ago. And in the literary realm, no one has fallen faster and further - or with greater notoriety attached - than Oscar Wilde, the Irish-born playwright, novelist and poet. Wilde's homosexual affair with the son of a member of Britain's House of Lords scandalized Victorian London, and resulted in a sensational libel trial in which the author's revelations on the witness stand led to his arrest for sodomy and a humiliating prison term that broke his spirit as an artist and a man. Two gut-wrenching scenes from this sad, tacky, hypocrisy-laden affair provide grist for the dramatic mill in "The Judas Kiss," the David Hare play making its Washington-Baltimore area debut at Rep Stage in Columbia.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | January 17, 2000
Every now and then a show comes along that has more drama surrounding it than there is on stage. David Hare's "The Blue Room," receiving its Baltimore premiere at the Spotlighters Theatre, is a prime example. I wouldn't go so far as to call it a case of the emperor's new clothes, tempting as that might be since the show has a generous display of nudity. The nudity, however, is the cause of all the attention. In London and New York, where Nicole Kidman appeared in the buff, "The Blue Room" not only made headlines and magazine covers, it became one of the hottest tickets on two continents.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | January 25, 1999
The central question about the former lovers at the core of David Hare's "Skylight" isn't just whether they'll get back together, but how they connected in the first place.In director Barry Feinstein's production at Fell's Point Corner Theatre, Mark E. Campion plays rich chauvinist Tom Sergeant, a successful restaurateur whose elitism fits him as comfortably as his very proper business suit.For years, Tom had an affair with Kyra Hollis, a young employee who lived in his home, alongside his wife and two children.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 19, 1997
David Hare's "Racing Demon" establishes its central debate almost immediately with a scene in which the Bishop of Southwark warns the Rev. Lionel Espy that parishioners have begun to doubt Lionel's convictions.But while Lionel may have doubts about God, Ralph Piersanti's gentle, low-keyed portrayal at Theatre Hopkins makes it clear that he does have convictions -- they're just different from those of the bishop and, by extension, the Church of England.Imbued with humility, Piersanti's Lionel is a concerned cleric who believes the rituals of the church are no longer relevant to most of his working class South London parishioners.
NEWS
By Donna Weaver and Donna Weaver,Staff writer | September 16, 1991
Pasadena portrait photographer David Hare is questioning why all 12 county high schools have selected the same Baltimore photography studio to take yearbook photos.Hare claims that Segall-Majestic holdsa monopoly on the county yearbook photography market, and he thinks it's unfair."This policy constitutes a closed shop," said Hare, owner of David Hare Photographers. "There should be freedom of choice. Students should have a right to choose their photographer."The photographer blames school officials for failing to set clear guidelines regardingyearbook photography, allowing schools to select their own photographers.
FEATURES
By Karin Remesch | September 8, 1999
Spotlighters Theatre. David Hare's "The Blue Room." Meeting for technical personnel -- production coordinator, assistant stage manager, light and sound designers, light and sound operators, props master, costumer, set design, set construction, set decorators, and dramaturg -- 7 p.m. Sunday at the theater, 817 St. Paul St.Auditions for acting roles at 7 p.m. Sept. 19-20 at the theater. Needed are up to 10 male and female actors, ages 20-45; some roles may be double cast. Some scenes include nudity.
NEWS
November 24, 1992
3 appointed to renewal committeeThree people, two of whom work in the urban renewal zone, were appointed last week to the Glen Burnie Urban Renewal Advisory Committee.William Sarro, owner of Scuba Hut, a diving supply store, and Emile Henault Jr., a lawyer in private practice, replace David Hare, who moved his photography business to Pasadena, and John Warner, who wished to devote time to other civic matters.Named to a vacancy on the committee was Daryl Jones, a deputy county prosecutor who was raised and lives in the Glen Burnie-Ferndale area.
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