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David Halberstam

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By Larry Williams and Larry Williams,Sun Reporter | April 24, 2007
David Halberstam, a tireless reporter who produced richly detailed chronicles of some of the great stories in modern American history - from the struggle for civil rights to Vietnam to the decline of the Detroit auto industry - as well as biographies of an array of sports heroes, was killed in a car crash yesterday morning in Menlo Park, south of San Francisco. He was 73. Mr. Halberstam died at the scene of the accident, after the car in which he was a front-seat passenger was broadsided by another vehicle.
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NEWS
By Catherine Sudue | April 27, 2008
Michael E. Cryor finds it an exciting time to be the chairman of the Democratic Party in Maryland. "Enthusiasm is high," he said. "People are invested in managing and maintaining a culture of collaboration." Cryor, who once co-chaired Martin O'Malley's campaign for governor, is the president and founder of the Cryor Group, which he describes as a communications consulting group that allows people to think more strategically about linking business goals and assets. "Thinking Points" by George Lakoff I love Lakoff's work because he directs us to think differently about the communication of values and ideas and how poorly Democrats have handled the challenge.
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NEWS
By Catherine Sudue | April 27, 2008
Michael E. Cryor finds it an exciting time to be the chairman of the Democratic Party in Maryland. "Enthusiasm is high," he said. "People are invested in managing and maintaining a culture of collaboration." Cryor, who once co-chaired Martin O'Malley's campaign for governor, is the president and founder of the Cryor Group, which he describes as a communications consulting group that allows people to think more strategically about linking business goals and assets. "Thinking Points" by George Lakoff I love Lakoff's work because he directs us to think differently about the communication of values and ideas and how poorly Democrats have handled the challenge.
NEWS
By Paul Moore and Paul Moore,Public Editor | May 6, 2007
Obituaries play a vital role in the lives of newspaper readers and are consistently among the best-read articles in The Sun. These chronicles of the lives of the famous and infamous, the extraordinary and ordinary, the well-known and little-known tell readers things about people they would otherwise never have known. Whether the obituaries appear on the front page, the Maryland section front or in the obituary pages themselves, The Sun always treats them as news articles. During a week in late April, obituaries of four remarkably different individuals were played on The Sun's front page: Boris N. Yeltsin, David Halberstam, Mary Carter Smith and Mstislav Rostropovich.
NEWS
By Paul Moore and Paul Moore,Public Editor | May 6, 2007
Obituaries play a vital role in the lives of newspaper readers and are consistently among the best-read articles in The Sun. These chronicles of the lives of the famous and infamous, the extraordinary and ordinary, the well-known and little-known tell readers things about people they would otherwise never have known. Whether the obituaries appear on the front page, the Maryland section front or in the obituary pages themselves, The Sun always treats them as news articles. During a week in late April, obituaries of four remarkably different individuals were played on The Sun's front page: Boris N. Yeltsin, David Halberstam, Mary Carter Smith and Mstislav Rostropovich.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | June 5, 1993
New York -- When David Halberstam began working on his big book on America in the 1950s, one thing he did not have to do was reorient his thinking about the decade. No one had to tell him it wasn't a time of "Happy Days" and a grandfatherly president who played golf while the rest of America had cookouts in the backyards of their new suburban homes.Then, as now, David Halberstam was on the outside, looking in. A son of Jewish immigrants, he felt an outsider while at Waspy Harvard in the mid-'50s.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | January 3, 1991
NO MATTER what you may have heard, I am not sulky about being omitted from New York magazine's list of the treasures of New York City.This rumor was probably started by a busybody who eavesdropped on my conversation with David Halberstam during the opera intermission the other night at Lincoln Center.All I said to Halberstam was, "I was a little surprised that when New York magazine asked you to name one of the treasures of New York you named Jules Feiffer instead of me.""A little surprised" is all I said.
NEWS
April 13, 1995
"October 1964," David Halberstam's chronicle of the end of the nearly all-white New York Yankee dynasty, will be reviewed at the next session of "Books Sandwiched In" at noon April 20 at Western Maryland College in McDaniel Lounge.Greg Alles, associate professor of religious studies, will share his views of the work, which focuses on the different racial attitudes of the National and American leagues.The Cardinals, a Southern team, welcomed black players while the Yankees had only token integration.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | November 4, 1999
If you've got a yen to quiz attorney Christopher Darden about the O.J. Simpson trial or to talk fiction with writers Barbara Taylor Bradford and Jackie Collins, you can do it -- if you can write a big enough check.It costs $300 just for a chance to hobnob with any author, or $2,500 to chow down with the author of your choice, but the money is going to a good cause: children's reading programs throughout the Los Angeles County library system. Volunteer hosts will each welcome well-known authors and 10 to 24 paying guests for an evening.
NEWS
May 25, 1996
Max J. Rubin, 90, a lawyer and former president of the New York City Board of Education, died Wednesday in Sykesville. From 1961 to 1963, he headed the board, winning the appointment from Mayor Robert F. Wagner. He also served on the White House Conference on Education in the 1950s. In 1953, he founded the law firm of Rubin, Baum, Levin Constant & Friedman.Jay Allen, 79, a literary publicist whose pioneering promotional book-tours turned his clients into best-selling celebrity authors, died Wednesday in Los Angeles.
NEWS
By Larry Williams and Larry Williams,Sun Reporter | April 24, 2007
David Halberstam, a tireless reporter who produced richly detailed chronicles of some of the great stories in modern American history - from the struggle for civil rights to Vietnam to the decline of the Detroit auto industry - as well as biographies of an array of sports heroes, was killed in a car crash yesterday morning in Menlo Park, south of San Francisco. He was 73. Mr. Halberstam died at the scene of the accident, after the car in which he was a front-seat passenger was broadsided by another vehicle.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | June 5, 1993
New York -- When David Halberstam began working on his big book on America in the 1950s, one thing he did not have to do was reorient his thinking about the decade. No one had to tell him it wasn't a time of "Happy Days" and a grandfatherly president who played golf while the rest of America had cookouts in the backyards of their new suburban homes.Then, as now, David Halberstam was on the outside, looking in. A son of Jewish immigrants, he felt an outsider while at Waspy Harvard in the mid-'50s.
NEWS
August 9, 2001
THE RELEASE of a movie doesn't generally rate an editorial. Re-releases are even less likely to garner comment. But the reopening this Friday of Francis Ford Coppola's epic Apocalypse Now is worth mentioning - not so much for its cinematic feats as for the enduring salience of its allegory. True, Apocalypse Now Redux boasts new footage that helps smooth some of the original film's rough narratives and fills some gaping storyline holes. It will certainly enhance the movie's compelling visuals; it will embolden Mr. Coppola's master status among Hollywood storytellers.
SPORTS
By KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG and KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG,SUN REPORTER | January 24, 2006
The Education of a Coach David Halberstam Hyperion Books/277 pages It should be noted somewhere that no author of any real regard ever went broke attempting to romanticize the sport of baseball, or the men who played it. For decades, through the media of fiction, nonfiction and occasionally film, writers such as John Updike, W.P. Kinsella, Gay Talese, Roger Angell, Bernard Malamud and Roger Kahn have waxed poetic about the sport, telling us, occasionally...
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