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By Steve McKerrow | March 27, 1992
Look for a local angle Sunday in the ABC series "America's Funniest Home Videos" (at 8 p.m., WJZ-Channel 13): Towson resident Debbie Meyer and family are among the three finalists for the weekly $10,000 prize for the night's best video."
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW | February 27, 2009
Capsules by Michael Sragow unless noted. Full reviews are at baltimoresun.com/movies. The Curious Case of Benjamin Button: **** It starts in 1918, when Benjamin Button (Brad Pitt) is born with an old face, dilapidated plumbing and wrinkled skin over an infant body, and ends in 2005, when his true love, Daisy (Cate Blanchett), completes the telling of his story. The movie's emotional completeness leaves you poised between sobbing and applauding - it comes from a full comprehension not just of one man's life, but of the intersection of many lives over the course of the 20th century.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | August 2, 1994
There's a way, by flipping channels, to get a night full of fine nonfiction television. Start with "TV Nation" on NBC, switch to a newly packaged version of the Richard Nixon/David Frost interviews on the Disney Channel, then join HBO's "Gang War" documentary in progress.* "TV Nation" (8-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- I love this show, and much of what I love about it is its dizzying variety. Tonight, for example, Michael Moore goes on a picnic with Dr. Jack Kevorkian, while another correspondent accompanies a door-to-door beauty-products saleswoman in the rain forests of Brazil.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2009
STAFF CRITICS TAKES ON THE TOP MOVIES Bolt What it's about : A dog who plays a superhero on TV thinks he is one in real life, which presents all sorts of problems. Rated: PG The scoop : The script is smart, its conceit a heart-tugger in the finest of senses, and it's the first Disney effort in way too long to be more concerned with being a movie than with being a breeding ground for product tie-ins. Grade ***: 1/2 ... Benjamin Button What it's about : In 1918, Benjamin Button (the never-better Brad Pitt, above)
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | August 9, 1994
On the 20th anniversary of Richard Nixon's resignation as president, cable offers two documentaries keyed to Watergate tonight. Unfortunately, they overlap -- but you can enjoy both, providing your TV room is equipped with a secret taping system. On broadcast TV, the most intriguing offering is a new episode of "TV Nation."* "TV Nation" (8-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- I don't want to give too much detail about which reports are scheduled in tonight's "TV Nation," because part of the fun is in the surprise, and in the variety.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | August 23, 1994
The best way to be entertained by TV tonight -- after watching "TV Nation" that is -- is to sample several cable movies to catch early roles by actors and actresses who today are a lot more in demand. Tonight's exhibits: Tommy Lee Jones, Jennifer Jason Leigh and Fran Drescher.* "TV Nation" (8-9 p.m., Channel 4) -- It's almost better not knowing what's on this show, because the variety is a constant and pleasant surprise. Suffice it to say that Michael Moore, Merrill Markoe and Ben Hamper are on the road and on the case.
NEWS
By Capsules by Michael Sragow | January 9, 2009
Capsules by Michael Sragow. Full reviews are at baltimoresun.com/movies. Frost/Nixon: *** 1/2 ( 3 1/2 STARS) Ron Howard has made his best movie, an electric political drama with a skin-prickling immediacy. Howard and his screenwriter, Peter Morgan (who also wrote the original play), have the wit to portray British TV interviewer David Frost (Michael Sheen) and disgraced former President Richard M. Nixon (Frank Langella) as David and Goliath. Frost's slingshot is a weapon that proved deadly to Nixon once before, during the Nixon/Kennedy TV debates: the all-seeing eye of the close-up lens.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2009
STAFF CRITICS TAKES ON THE TOP MOVIES Bolt What it's about : A dog who plays a superhero on TV thinks he is one in real life, which presents all sorts of problems. Rated: PG The scoop : The script is smart, its conceit a heart-tugger in the finest of senses, and it's the first Disney effort in way too long to be more concerned with being a movie than with being a breeding ground for product tie-ins. Grade ***: 1/2 ... Benjamin Button What it's about : In 1918, Benjamin Button (the never-better Brad Pitt, above)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2009
... Benjamin Button What it's about : In 1918, Benjamin Button (the never-better Brad Pitt, above) is born with an old face and dilapidated plumbing and wrinkled skin over an infant body. Then he ages backward. Rated: PG-13 The scoop : Every chapter of Button's story brings a fresh air of discovery. And the movie's emotional completeness leaves you poised between sobbing and applauding - it comes from a full comprehension not just of one man's life, but of the intersection of many lives over the course of the 20th century.
SPORTS
December 10, 1990
Jackie Sherrill named coach at Miss. StateJackie Sherrill, who left Texas A&M two years ago with the Aggies on NCAA probation, returned to college football yesterday when he was named as coach at Mississippi State.Sherrill, who spent two years in private business after leaving Texas A&M, replaces Rockey Felker, who resigned under pressure two weeks ago after a 5-6 season, the Bulldogs' fourth straight losing campaign.The NCAA eventually cleared Texas A&M of allegations that former player George Smith received "hush" money, saying it could not distinguish fact from fiction.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2009
... Benjamin Button What it's about : In 1918, Benjamin Button (the never-better Brad Pitt, above) is born with an old face and dilapidated plumbing and wrinkled skin over an infant body. Then he ages backward. Rated: PG-13 The scoop : Every chapter of Button's story brings a fresh air of discovery. And the movie's emotional completeness leaves you poised between sobbing and applauding - it comes from a full comprehension not just of one man's life, but of the intersection of many lives over the course of the 20th century.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | December 25, 2008
Ron Howard has made his best movie with Frost/Nixon, an electric political drama with a skin-prickling immediacy. Howard and his screenwriter, Peter Morgan (who also wrote the original play) have the wit to portray British TV interviewer David Frost (Michael Sheen) and disgraced former President Richard Nixon (Frank Langella) as David and Goliath. Frost's slingshot is a weapon that proved deadly to Nixon once before, during the Nixon/Kennedy TV debates: the all-seeing eye of the close-up lens.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | August 23, 1994
The best way to be entertained by TV tonight -- after watching "TV Nation" that is -- is to sample several cable movies to catch early roles by actors and actresses who today are a lot more in demand. Tonight's exhibits: Tommy Lee Jones, Jennifer Jason Leigh and Fran Drescher.* "TV Nation" (8-9 p.m., Channel 4) -- It's almost better not knowing what's on this show, because the variety is a constant and pleasant surprise. Suffice it to say that Michael Moore, Merrill Markoe and Ben Hamper are on the road and on the case.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | August 9, 1994
On the 20th anniversary of Richard Nixon's resignation as president, cable offers two documentaries keyed to Watergate tonight. Unfortunately, they overlap -- but you can enjoy both, providing your TV room is equipped with a secret taping system. On broadcast TV, the most intriguing offering is a new episode of "TV Nation."* "TV Nation" (8-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- I don't want to give too much detail about which reports are scheduled in tonight's "TV Nation," because part of the fun is in the surprise, and in the variety.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | August 2, 1994
There's a way, by flipping channels, to get a night full of fine nonfiction television. Start with "TV Nation" on NBC, switch to a newly packaged version of the Richard Nixon/David Frost interviews on the Disney Channel, then join HBO's "Gang War" documentary in progress.* "TV Nation" (8-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- I love this show, and much of what I love about it is its dizzying variety. Tonight, for example, Michael Moore goes on a picnic with Dr. Jack Kevorkian, while another correspondent accompanies a door-to-door beauty-products saleswoman in the rain forests of Brazil.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | March 27, 1992
Look for a local angle Sunday in the ABC series "America's Funniest Home Videos" (at 8 p.m., WJZ-Channel 13): Towson resident Debbie Meyer and family are among the three finalists for the weekly $10,000 prize for the night's best video."
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