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David Drake

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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | March 7, 1994
When actor/playwright David Drake returns to Baltimore tomorrow to sign copies of his newly published script, "The Night Larry Kramer Kissed Me," he will have come full circle.Not only is the script the semi-autobiographical story of his coming of age as a gay man in Maryland, but before the New York premiere of "Larry Kramer" in 1992, Drake tried out parts of the one-man show at Towson State University and Maryland Art Place.Since then, the 30-year-old boyish-looking performer won one of off-Broadway's coveted Obie Awards for his performance in "Larry Kramer."
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 4, 2002
Son of Drakula, the new one-man show by Obie Award-winning former Marylander David Drake, will make its world premiere at the Theatre Project May 16. The autobiographical show was inspired by a genealogical quest that took Drake (whose original surname was "Drakula") to Eastern Europe where he explored links to Vlad the Impaler. In the tradition of Drake's award-winning off-Broadway hit, The Night Larry Kramer Kissed Me, which was filmed at the Theatre Project in 1999, the new work also examines personal, political and psychological issues.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 14, 1999
It's taken a long time, but David Drake is home at last.Seven years ago, Drake's one-man show, "The Night Larry Kramer Kissed Me," became an off-Broadway sensation. He went on to perform this sensitive and hard-hitting, touching and explosive show in cities ranging from Los Angeles to London, from San Francisco to Sydney, Australia.The irony is that the semi-autobiographical show is set, in part, in Maryland, where Drake grew up. He even tried some of the material out here years ago. Drake has wanted to bring his show home for some time, and now he finally has.An account of Drake's coming of age as a gay man, "The Night Larry Kramer Kissed Me" is making its Baltimore debut at the Theatre Project, where it is being filmed before a live audience for release as an independent feature.
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By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 9, 2000
Turning a one-man play into a one-man movie is a risky proposition. Will a powerful stage performance transfer to the screen? Should the film director open the piece up and show all the characters and streets only referred to in the stage monologue? In the spirit of the film version of Spalding Gray's "Swimming to Cambodia," which retained the stage-bound monologue format, the film version of David Drake's 1992 off-Broadway play "The Night Larry Kramer Kissed Me" basically shoots it straight.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 1, 1998
Obie Award-winning actor and writer David Drake has been back in town lately. This time, the former Marylander has taken up directing, and Baltimore audiences will get to see a sample when "Queer Cafe 2" opens at the Theatre Project on Thursday.For his contribution to this anthology of five short works, Drake, -- 34, is directing the premiere of "The Mirror of Love," a monologue by British comic book writer Alan Moore, which Drake is adapting for the stage along with Jose Villarrubia, who will perform the piece.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 4, 2002
Son of Drakula, the new one-man show by Obie Award-winning former Marylander David Drake, will make its world premiere at the Theatre Project May 16. The autobiographical show was inspired by a genealogical quest that took Drake (whose original surname was "Drakula") to Eastern Europe where he explored links to Vlad the Impaler. In the tradition of Drake's award-winning off-Broadway hit, The Night Larry Kramer Kissed Me, which was filmed at the Theatre Project in 1999, the new work also examines personal, political and psychological issues.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 10, 1999
Although much of David Drake's semi-autobiographical one-man show, "The Night Larry Kramer Kissed Me," takes place in his home state of Maryland, he has never performed the entire show here -- until now.Beginning Wednesday, Drake will repeat his Obie Award-winning performance at the Theatre Project, where the show -- a portrait of the artist as a gay young man -- will be filmed before a live audience for release as an independent feature."
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By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 9, 2000
Turning a one-man play into a one-man movie is a risky proposition. Will a powerful stage performance transfer to the screen? Should the film director open the piece up and show all the characters and streets only referred to in the stage monologue? In the spirit of the film version of Spalding Gray's "Swimming to Cambodia," which retained the stage-bound monologue format, the film version of David Drake's 1992 off-Broadway play "The Night Larry Kramer Kissed Me" basically shoots it straight.
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November 29, 1990
Saturday marks "Day Without Art 1990," which celebrates the achievements of AIDS victims while mourning the losses in creative communities. It is a project of the New York-based group Visual AIDS.The Baltimore visual arts community will join the effort:* BAUhouse, 1713 N. Charles St., will sponsor "AIDS=AID," a monthlong exhibition of artwork from artists in the Mid-Atlantic region. ACT UP BALTO (the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power -- Baltimore) will co-sponsor the show, which opens Saturday and runs through Dec. 31. The BAUhouse opening also features "The Night Larry Kramer Kissed Me" by New York performance artist and writer David Drake.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 29, 2000
The world premiere of a film by actress Jill Hennessy and a documentary about the career of former House Speaker Newt Gingrich will be two highlights of this year's Maryland Film Festival, organizers are expected to announce today. The festival will also feature the U.S. premiere of a film about the Baltimore Orioles' 1999 trip to Cuba and "The Night Larry Kramer Kissed Me," the filmed version of David Drake's play. In keeping with a tradition established last year, local luminaries will present their own personal choices, and John Waters will introduce yet another fabulous stinker from his gallery of great failed movies.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 14, 1999
It's taken a long time, but David Drake is home at last.Seven years ago, Drake's one-man show, "The Night Larry Kramer Kissed Me," became an off-Broadway sensation. He went on to perform this sensitive and hard-hitting, touching and explosive show in cities ranging from Los Angeles to London, from San Francisco to Sydney, Australia.The irony is that the semi-autobiographical show is set, in part, in Maryland, where Drake grew up. He even tried some of the material out here years ago. Drake has wanted to bring his show home for some time, and now he finally has.An account of Drake's coming of age as a gay man, "The Night Larry Kramer Kissed Me" is making its Baltimore debut at the Theatre Project, where it is being filmed before a live audience for release as an independent feature.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 10, 1999
Although much of David Drake's semi-autobiographical one-man show, "The Night Larry Kramer Kissed Me," takes place in his home state of Maryland, he has never performed the entire show here -- until now.Beginning Wednesday, Drake will repeat his Obie Award-winning performance at the Theatre Project, where the show -- a portrait of the artist as a gay young man -- will be filmed before a live audience for release as an independent feature."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 1, 1998
Obie Award-winning actor and writer David Drake has been back in town lately. This time, the former Marylander has taken up directing, and Baltimore audiences will get to see a sample when "Queer Cafe 2" opens at the Theatre Project on Thursday.For his contribution to this anthology of five short works, Drake, -- 34, is directing the premiere of "The Mirror of Love," a monologue by British comic book writer Alan Moore, which Drake is adapting for the stage along with Jose Villarrubia, who will perform the piece.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | March 7, 1994
When actor/playwright David Drake returns to Baltimore tomorrow to sign copies of his newly published script, "The Night Larry Kramer Kissed Me," he will have come full circle.Not only is the script the semi-autobiographical story of his coming of age as a gay man in Maryland, but before the New York premiere of "Larry Kramer" in 1992, Drake tried out parts of the one-man show at Towson State University and Maryland Art Place.Since then, the 30-year-old boyish-looking performer won one of off-Broadway's coveted Obie Awards for his performance in "Larry Kramer."
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By J. Wynn Rousuck | June 4, 1998
"Queer Cafe 2," a follow-up to last season's evening of short gay and lesbian plays, opens tonight at the Theatre Project. This year's five offerings, produced by the PussyCat Theatre Company, are all world premieres."Penelope and the Sterile Field," by Center Stage resident dramaturg James Magruder, is about the barriers facing a gay man searching for the ideal mate. "The Mirror of Love," by Alan Moore, is a monologue tracing homosexuality throughout history. Pretzels and Longing," by Linda Eisenstein, focuses on the lesbian dating scene.
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By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2013
Sadly, the Maryland SPCA receives pets that are surrendered by neighbors of people who have passed away, because no one has made plans for the animals ahead of time. No pet lover wants to think of their dog, cat, bird, or other animal being put up for adoption, so the SPCA is hosting a seminar to help owners make plans for pets who may outlive them. The seminar will be held Sunday, March 17 at 2 p.m., and again Wednesday, March 27 at 7 p.m. at the SPCA's administrative office, 3300 Falls Road, Baltimore.
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