Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDavid Chase
IN THE NEWS

David Chase

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | August 12, 2005
In the sweetest news of the summer for lovers of great television drama, HBO announced yesterday that David Chase, creator of The Sopranos, has agreed to make eight extra episodes of the acclaimed crime drama. That means viewers can look forward to 20 new episodes instead of the 12 that are now in production for Season 6, which is scheduled to begin in March. The eight extra episodes will launch in January 2007 as an abbreviated Season 7. "We are obviously delighted that we will be able to extend The Sopranos series beyond its slated 12 episodes," said Chris Albrecht, chairman of HBO. "When something is as remarkable as The Sopranos, our audience would like to see it continue as long as possible, so we are thrilled that David Chase felt there are more stories to be told."
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2013
James Gandolfini, whose remarkable performance as mob boss Tony Soprano in HBO's "The Sopranos" re-imagined the anti-hero for American television, is dead at 51 years of age. The actor, who is believed to have died of a heart attack, was traveling in Italy at the time of his death Wednesday. HBO confirmed his death. "We're all in shock and feeling immeasurable sadness at the loss of a beloved member of our family," an HBO statement said. "He was special man, a great talent, but more importantly a gentle and loving person who treated everyone no matter their title or position with equal respect.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Liz Smith and Liz Smith,Tribune Media services | June 19, 2007
DIRECT FROM Hollywood -- Jill and Brad Grey will be seen at a wedding this very day in La-La Land; they aren't canceling although their own actual marriage is in an iffy state. They gave me this statement, "We are sad to say we are taking a trial separation from our marriage. We have been together since we were in college and it's our hope that we will be able to work things out for our sake and the sake of our three children." Brad is CEO of Paramount Pictures, helped found Brillstein-Grey Entertainment and helped create The Sopranos.
NEWS
By From Sun news sources | November 15, 2008
It takes two women to replace one Amy Poehler on 'Saturday Night Live' Saturday Night Live has two new faces - Abby Elliott and Michaela Watkins - to replace Amy Poehler, who has left the show, NBC announced Thursday. Elliott was part of the Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre - the improv/sketch company co-founded by Poehler - where she trained and performed in New York and Los Angeles. Her father, Chris Elliott, was an SNL cast member in the 1994-1995 season. (Her grandfather Bob Elliott worked four decades with Ray Goulding as Bob & Ray.)
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Reporter | June 12, 2007
If you thought Tony Soprano had issues, you should talk to fans of The Sopranos. A day after the final episode of the landmark HBO mob drama, reaction to creator David Chase's ambiguous jump-to-black ending ranged from he's-a-genius praise to outright scorn. Some people simply thought the cable had gone out. "I liked it," said long-time fan Zack Chaiken, 28, of Baltimore. "To me, it was pretty clear that Tony gets a bullet." "I just thought it was horrible," said Bitsy Cramer of Timonium.
NEWS
By From Sun news sources | November 15, 2008
It takes two women to replace one Amy Poehler on 'Saturday Night Live' Saturday Night Live has two new faces - Abby Elliott and Michaela Watkins - to replace Amy Poehler, who has left the show, NBC announced Thursday. Elliott was part of the Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre - the improv/sketch company co-founded by Poehler - where she trained and performed in New York and Los Angeles. Her father, Chris Elliott, was an SNL cast member in the 1994-1995 season. (Her grandfather Bob Elliott worked four decades with Ray Goulding as Bob & Ray.)
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2013
James Gandolfini, whose remarkable performance as mob boss Tony Soprano in HBO's "The Sopranos" re-imagined the anti-hero for American television, is dead at 51 years of age. The actor, who is believed to have died of a heart attack, was traveling in Italy at the time of his death Wednesday. HBO confirmed his death. "We're all in shock and feeling immeasurable sadness at the loss of a beloved member of our family," an HBO statement said. "He was special man, a great talent, but more importantly a gentle and loving person who treated everyone no matter their title or position with equal respect.
FEATURES
By Liz Smith and Liz Smith,Tribune Media Services | June 12, 2007
THERE'S A sucker born every minute," said P.T. Barnum. And maybe some fans of The Sopranos are feeling likewise, with the "unsatisfying" go-to-black finale to the series on Sunday night. But in a way, the show ended perfectly, if not with the high level of violence, comeuppance or escape devoutly wished for by so many. There they sat in a restaurant, four not-terribly-bright, craven, greedy, clueless, messed up people - one a violent killer - pondering the possibility of manicotti. Completely ordinary except for the dozens of murders and crimes that littered their past, occupied the present and shadowed the future.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan and Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun   | April 20, 2013
Two people died and four were rescued in a boating accident on the Chesapeake Bay Saturday when their 25-foot boat capsized two miles south of Point Lookout State Park in St. Mary's County, according to Department of Natural Resources Police. Sgt. Brian Albert, a spokesman for the DNR police, said authorities were still on the scene and were trying to recover the boat. The victims were identified as two Lexington Park, Md., men - David Chase, 55, and David Fletcher, 43. "We think that the accident was due to rough seas, but we're not positive," Albert said.
NEWS
June 13, 2007
When the screen suddenly went blank at the climactic moment of Sunday night's finale of The Sopranos, we imagine that many Americans reacted the way we did. We started panicking, angrily jabbing buttons on the remote control, checking the connections, wondering if somehow the broadcast had been interrupted. But no. That was it. Tony and Carmela and A. J. in a diner, Meadow rushing toward the door, Tony glancing up and then - nothing. Blank screen. No music. After a few seconds, the credits roll.
FEATURES
By Liz Smith and Liz Smith,Tribune Media services | June 19, 2007
DIRECT FROM Hollywood -- Jill and Brad Grey will be seen at a wedding this very day in La-La Land; they aren't canceling although their own actual marriage is in an iffy state. They gave me this statement, "We are sad to say we are taking a trial separation from our marriage. We have been together since we were in college and it's our hope that we will be able to work things out for our sake and the sake of our three children." Brad is CEO of Paramount Pictures, helped found Brillstein-Grey Entertainment and helped create The Sopranos.
FEATURES
By Liz Smith and Liz Smith,Tribune Media Services | June 12, 2007
THERE'S A sucker born every minute," said P.T. Barnum. And maybe some fans of The Sopranos are feeling likewise, with the "unsatisfying" go-to-black finale to the series on Sunday night. But in a way, the show ended perfectly, if not with the high level of violence, comeuppance or escape devoutly wished for by so many. There they sat in a restaurant, four not-terribly-bright, craven, greedy, clueless, messed up people - one a violent killer - pondering the possibility of manicotti. Completely ordinary except for the dozens of murders and crimes that littered their past, occupied the present and shadowed the future.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Reporter | June 12, 2007
If you thought Tony Soprano had issues, you should talk to fans of The Sopranos. A day after the final episode of the landmark HBO mob drama, reaction to creator David Chase's ambiguous jump-to-black ending ranged from he's-a-genius praise to outright scorn. Some people simply thought the cable had gone out. "I liked it," said long-time fan Zack Chaiken, 28, of Baltimore. "To me, it was pretty clear that Tony gets a bullet." "I just thought it was horrible," said Bitsy Cramer of Timonium.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | August 12, 2005
In the sweetest news of the summer for lovers of great television drama, HBO announced yesterday that David Chase, creator of The Sopranos, has agreed to make eight extra episodes of the acclaimed crime drama. That means viewers can look forward to 20 new episodes instead of the 12 that are now in production for Season 6, which is scheduled to begin in March. The eight extra episodes will launch in January 2007 as an abbreviated Season 7. "We are obviously delighted that we will be able to extend The Sopranos series beyond its slated 12 episodes," said Chris Albrecht, chairman of HBO. "When something is as remarkable as The Sopranos, our audience would like to see it continue as long as possible, so we are thrilled that David Chase felt there are more stories to be told."
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff Writer | August 12, 1993
For the past month, Kathleen G. Kotarba has been fighting the battle to preserve Baltimore's past all by herself.As executive director of the city's Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation, she used to supervise a staff of five preservationists. But government downsizing since 1987 has now left her alone to review any changes to 7,000 historic properties.The shrinking of the commission's paid staff at a time when Baltimore's historic districts grew from 12 to 18 worries local and state preservation groups.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.