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David Byrne

SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,SUN STAFF | November 11, 1995
If the Spirit's Dave Vaudreuil felt inclined, which he doesn't, he could be a world-class name-dropper.Did you know he is a good friend of actress Brooke Shields, and that they were members of the same eating club for two years when they were at Princeton?Did you know that another Princeton friend, football player Dean Cain, who dated Shields for a while, now plays Superman on TV?Did you know that two of the hockey players he competed against as a youth, Brian Leetch and Craig Janney, are now with the NHL's New York Rangers and San Jose Sharks, respectively?
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 22, 1991
TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES II: THE SECRET OF 0) THE OOZEOriginal Soundtrack (SBK 96204)Vanilla Ice may have an on-screen role in the movie itself, but when it comes to the soundtrack for "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles II: The Secret of the Ooze," he's strictly a bit player. Not that his "Ninja Rap" is an especially shoddy piece of work; it's actually pretty catchy, even if its "Go ninja, go ninja, go!" chorus sounds awfully similar to an M. C. Hammer routine. But the truth is, Ice is frozen out by the album's other contributors, particularly Cathy Dennis and David Morales' searing "Find the Key to Your Life," Spunkadelic's feisty "Creatures of Habit" and Dan Hartman's soulful "(That's Your)
SPORTS
November 17, 1991
Domenic Mobilio and the Baltimore Blast put aside one of the more controversial weeks in the history of the franchise last night and defeated the seven-time Major Soccer League champion San Diego Sockers, 8-7, at the Baltimore Arena.Mobilio scored four goals to carry the Blast to its second victory in six games this season, ruining Tim Wittman's return to the Arena.A 10-year Blast veteran, Wittman was not re-signed after a run-in with owner Ed Hale at a team meeting last March and subsequently signed with the Sockers.
FEATURES
By New York Times | October 22, 1991
In the 1960s and '70s, rock stars had literary pretentions on a grown-up scale. Bob Dylan's "Tarantula," for one, read like an attempt to combine "Finnegans Wake" and Gertrude Stein.Now, with the graying of the original rock generation, the main literary influences seem to be "The Little Engine That Could" and "Where the Wild Things Are."A walk through the children's section at bookstores lately feels oddly like a stroll through a music store -- Carly Simon on one shelf, Michael Jackson on another and over in the corner, Jimmy Buffett's latest -- as rock and pop stars cross over in ever greater numbers from adult music to children's literature.
NEWS
December 4, 2000
Mutated polio vaccine infects three in Haiti, Dominican Republic SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican Republic - A mutated polio vaccine has infected at least three people in the Dominican Republic and Haiti, causing the first outbreak of the disease in the Western Hemisphere since 1991, the Pan American Health Organization said. The outbreak "has raised serious concerns" because it has been traced to the same oral vaccine that experts have used to eliminate the disease in many countries, said a statement released Saturday by the organization, which is a part of the Washington-based Organization of American States.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | February 21, 1992
A bearded lady who juggles fire, a lesbian dressed as a drag queen and a duo called the Scum Wrenches that specializes in confrontational political performance art. Is this cabaret? Is it comedy? Or on a more basic level, is it art?Baltimore audiences can decide for themselves beginning tonight when the month-long New York-Baltimore New Performance Festival opens with Avant-Garde-Arama, a multi-media showcase from New York's Performance Space 122. In addition to P.S. 122, the festival will highlight work from two other New York experimental venues -- Dixon Place and the Kitchen.
SPORTS
By Bill Free | January 21, 1991
Chico Borja was back in Wichita, Kan., last night with a bruised right shoulder, but the show went on at the Baltimore Arena.The Baltimore Blast kicked the Wichita Wings around for 30 minutes and then held off a second-half rally for a 9-6 victory in a wild Major Soccer League encounter before 5,827.The win moved Baltimore (16-13) into a first-place tie with the Kansas City Comets (16-13) in the MSL Eastern Division.It is the first time this season Baltimore has shared first place with the Comets, who started 9-1. The Blast got within one game of Kansas City twice but fell back.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 6, 1993
Could that be Bruce Springsteen on the Parkway singing "Streets of Philadelphia?"Sources involved with the production of Jonathan Demme's "Philadelphia" report that the Boss will be in town today and tomorrow to shoot a music video for his theme song to the forthcoming film.Mr. Springsteen and the video crew are expected to set up at a number of outdoor locations in the area, though where remains a secret.The hymnlike "Streets of Philadelphia," which was written by Mr. Springsteen, is the opening song in the compelling AIDS drama starring Tom Hanks and Denzel Washington.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | May 8, 1994
For 36 years, members of the Water & Woods Fishing Club have gathered at Harrison's Chesapeake House on Tilghman Island on the last Friday in April to eat, drink and be merry, before waking at the crack of dawn Saturday for a day on the bay. The club got its start in 1958, when 30 sportsmen got together to fish the Choptank River with Capt. Buddy Harrison, and the rest is history. Today the doctors, lawyers, politicos and writers who arrive at Tilghman share one primary interest: They are all "FOBs."
FEATURES
By New York Daily News | February 26, 1992
NEW YORK -- You've paid your $25 for the concert ticket; you've endured the warm-up act patiently, and now the time has come. The band you came to see launches into its first tune and -- yes! The sound is there, just like the album -- only this time it's so loud you can feel it.The musicians in the spotlight, however, aren't the only ones responsible for supplying that sound. Bands (and concertgoers) have to rely on the sound engineer to translate what happens on stage into a clear, recognizable piece of music.
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