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David Brinkley

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By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | June 13, 2003
David Brinkley, the courtly news anchor and commentator for two major networks whose mischievous wit complemented his mastery of all things political, died Wednesday night at his home in Houston after a fall. Mr. Brinkley was 82. Peers described him yesterday as a generous colleague, precise in his coverage, solicitous of his juniors and always alert to the joys of the absurd. As co-host of NBC's Huntley-Brinkley Report from 1956 to 1971, perhaps his most famous job, he helped to fashion the modern newscast on television - a "new, highly complex machine that had arrived without an instruction book," as he later put it. Together, Mr. Brinkley and Mr. Huntley "set a high standard and stuck to it," Tom Brokaw, anchor for NBC Nightly News, said yesterday by telephone.
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HEALTH
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2014
The troubled Maryland health exchange is facing another setback after a programming error sent Medicaid enrollment packets for as many as 1,078 customers to the wrong addresses, it announced on Sunday. The packets included the names, dates of birth and Medicaid ID numbers of the customers, but they did not include Social Security numbers or financial or medical information, the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene announced. The state stopped mailing all enrollment packages when it discovered the error Friday, and Medicaid and IT employees worked over the weekend to find the issue, which was identified as a programming error by Noridian Healthcare Solutions, the primary contractor that received a $71 million contract in 2012 to develop the exchange, the announcement said.
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FEATURES
By Bill Thomas and Bill Thomas,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 11, 1996
Legendary television newsman David Brinkley went into semi-retirement yesterday with a bang and a whimper.His final appearance as the host of "This Week With David Brinkley" began with an apology to his guest, President Clinton. Last week Brinkley, 76, concluded ABC's election night coverage at 1: 30 a.m. by calling Clinton "a bore" whose speeches are full of "goddamn nonsense."His cranky comments jeopardized an interview with Clinton that was scheduled to be taped on Friday and aired yesterday.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2012
Nearly a half-dozen Maryland state lawmakers are hoping to exploit the nation's anti-incumbent mood with campaigns for Congress that focus heavily on Washington's dysfunction. Two Republican state senators, David Brinkley of Frederick County and Nancy Jacobs of Harford County, announced plans this week to run for the House of Representatives. A third, Democrat C. Anthony Muse of Prince George's County, is expected to toss his name in for the Senate on Thursday. They join several others hoping to trade Annapolis for Washington in the November election.
NEWS
November 8, 1993
Movie official says that violence is outThe entertainment industry "is ready to assume its responsibility" and has already taken steps to reduce violence on television and in films, Motion Picture Association of America President Jack Valenti said yesterday."
FEATURES
By Verne Gay and Verne Gay,Newsday | April 17, 1992
What would a contract negotiation with ABC News' Sam Donaldson be like if it were not hot and boisterous?Well, Mr. Donaldson's contract is up and -- guess what? -- the negotiations are hot and boisterous.How so? Mr. Donaldson has vehemently refused to accept a cut -- any cut -- in his $1 million-plus salary, according to widespread reports at ABC News. Because the network is trying to force strict cost-measures on the once-lush news division, Mr. Donaldson's demands have not been well received.
NEWS
By RICK HOROWITZ | September 16, 1992
''I went along with one Democratic tax increase, and I'm not going to do it again -- ever, ever!''George Bush, on a Wednesday.''It wasn't a pledge, no. He was saying, as he's said before, that he wouldn't make that mistake again.''Marlin Fitzwater, the very next morning.''Is that a pledge or is it not?''David Brinkley to Dan Quayle, on Sunday.''You can define it any way you want to.''Dan Quayle to David Brinkley.(Curtain rises on the president and a group of children, sitting in a bedroom.
NEWS
February 24, 2010
Leave it the Republicans in our General Assembly, who had their four years of opportunity and blew it to come up with some featherbrained schemes like those proposed by Sens. E.J Pipkin and David Brinkley ("GOP comes to the table," Feb. 24). These two sleepwalkers need to wake up and review past events owing to the fact that most of their spending cut proposals are rehashed washouts. Why in the world they harp on splitting teacher retirement costs with local governments and increasing state employee pension contributions is far beyond comprehension.
NEWS
October 31, 2008
Frederick senator agrees to protective order terms A state senator from Frederick County has agreed to immediately move out of his Mount Airy home after allegations by his wife that he pushed her on a bed, then choked her when she got up. The agreement yesterday followed a request for a protective order filed Tuesday on behalf of Sallie Brinkley, wife of Republican Sen. David Brinkley. Under the agreement, David Brinkley is consenting to the protective order without admitting that any abuse occurred.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | June 18, 2003
ARLINGTON, Va. - David Brinkley, who died June 11 at age 82, was the greatest broadcast journalist who ever lived. There are many reasons for that. One is that he had a gift for stating complicated things simply. If there was ever a cliche in his writing (and he wrote all of his own stuff, unlike many in what passes for broadcast journalism today), I never saw it. And I would have seen it, because I was a copy boy at NBC News in Washington in the early '60s and in charge of filing the correspondents' scripts.
NEWS
February 24, 2010
Leave it the Republicans in our General Assembly, who had their four years of opportunity and blew it to come up with some featherbrained schemes like those proposed by Sens. E.J Pipkin and David Brinkley ("GOP comes to the table," Feb. 24). These two sleepwalkers need to wake up and review past events owing to the fact that most of their spending cut proposals are rehashed washouts. Why in the world they harp on splitting teacher retirement costs with local governments and increasing state employee pension contributions is far beyond comprehension.
NEWS
October 31, 2008
Frederick senator agrees to protective order terms A state senator from Frederick County has agreed to immediately move out of his Mount Airy home after allegations by his wife that he pushed her on a bed, then choked her when she got up. The agreement yesterday followed a request for a protective order filed Tuesday on behalf of Sallie Brinkley, wife of Republican Sen. David Brinkley. Under the agreement, David Brinkley is consenting to the protective order without admitting that any abuse occurred.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Jensen and Elizabeth Jensen,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 1, 2003
WASHINGTON - When ABC This Week anchor George Stephanopoulos was the host of a tony Washington book party at his Georgetown house in June, he invited his Sunday morning TV competition. Tim Russert, host of NBC's top-rated Meet the Press, amiably rose to the occasion, at one point holding court in Stephanopoulos' kitchen. Behind the scenes, if not at parties, the Sunday morning rivalry is about to get a touch less all-in-good-fun. Political Washington has been buzzing for weeks about Russert's growing clout, going so far as to proclaim success or failure as a guest on his program a primary election unto itself for the Democratic presidential candidates.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | June 18, 2003
ARLINGTON, Va. - David Brinkley, who died June 11 at age 82, was the greatest broadcast journalist who ever lived. There are many reasons for that. One is that he had a gift for stating complicated things simply. If there was ever a cliche in his writing (and he wrote all of his own stuff, unlike many in what passes for broadcast journalism today), I never saw it. And I would have seen it, because I was a copy boy at NBC News in Washington in the early '60s and in charge of filing the correspondents' scripts.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 16, 2003
WASHINGTON - To appreciate David Brinkley, who died the other day just short of age 83, it's necessary only to do two things: Look back at some of his old television clips, and then look at what often passes for TV commentary today. Too frequently, it's like going from civilized dinner party conversation to verbal mud wrestling; from an exercise in rational persuasion to eardrum abuse from near-hysterical shouters making up in volume and vituperation what they lack in substance and fairness.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | June 13, 2003
David Brinkley, the courtly news anchor and commentator for two major networks whose mischievous wit complemented his mastery of all things political, died Wednesday night at his home in Houston after a fall. Mr. Brinkley was 82. Peers described him yesterday as a generous colleague, precise in his coverage, solicitous of his juniors and always alert to the joys of the absurd. As co-host of NBC's Huntley-Brinkley Report from 1956 to 1971, perhaps his most famous job, he helped to fashion the modern newscast on television - a "new, highly complex machine that had arrived without an instruction book," as he later put it. Together, Mr. Brinkley and Mr. Huntley "set a high standard and stuck to it," Tom Brokaw, anchor for NBC Nightly News, said yesterday by telephone.
NEWS
By Jack Germond & Jules Witcover | January 12, 1998
WASHINGTON -- It was more in sorrow than in anger that we read that David Brinkley, one of the icons in the business of political journalism, had decided in his retirement from ABC News to become television spokesman for a corporation that is among the sponsors of the Sunday morning interview show that he used to moderate and that used to bear his name.Brinkley's own business what he chooses to do in his retirement. But at the same time he is not just any run-of-the-mill television reporter or analyst.
FEATURES
By Mike Littwin | November 8, 1996
DAVID BRINKLEY gives me reason to live.David Brinkley is 76, going into semi-retirement, and he just doesn't give a, uh, darn anymore.So, at his advanced age, and covering his last presidential election, sitting in a hyped-up ABC set that most resembled a Pentagon situation room, Brinkley did something so astonishing that his colleagues gasped and viewers raced to their phones to call either ABC or 911.Here's what Brinkley did, in case you missed it: He...
NEWS
By Jeff Cohen | January 25, 1998
I've discovered a sound even worse than nails dragging across chalkboard. It's the sound of journalists whining about their fallen "icon," David Brinkley.Enough already!Some journalists can't stop moaning about how the ex-anchorman tarnished his fine reputation by becoming a pitchman for Archer Daniels Midland (ADM), the agribusiness firm and corporate welfare king that sponsored "This Week With David Brinkley" from its launch in 1981.The problem with all the noise about Brinkley's role as a corporate huckster is that these same mainstream journalists are usually silent over a much bigger issue: the power of TV sponsors to shape - and limit - debate.
NEWS
By Jack Germond & Jules Witcover | January 12, 1998
WASHINGTON -- It was more in sorrow than in anger that we read that David Brinkley, one of the icons in the business of political journalism, had decided in his retirement from ABC News to become television spokesman for a corporation that is among the sponsors of the Sunday morning interview show that he used to moderate and that used to bear his name.Brinkley's own business what he chooses to do in his retirement. But at the same time he is not just any run-of-the-mill television reporter or analyst.
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