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David Berkowitz

NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | December 11, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court blocked states yesterday from getting money for victims of crime by taking over the fees or royalties that criminals get for telling their stories in books, magazines, movies or broadcasts.In a unanimous ruling, the court struck down a New York law designed to stop criminals from making profits out of their crimes, saying the law violated the free speech rights of criminals whose storytelling itself is not a crime, and the rights of publishers and others who pay for criminals' stories.
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NEWS
By Gail Gibson, Michael Stroh and Scott Shane and Gail Gibson, Michael Stroh and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | October 16, 2002
One was a Rockville man who disappeared two days before the sniper attacks began. He had recently purchased a .223-caliber rifle, and he drove a white van with a ladder on top. A recovering drug addict, he had recently accumulated large debts. Another was a former Marine from Baltimore with a white Chevrolet Astro van whose enthusiasm for firearms was shared by his girlfriend. Investigating the couple after a domestic shooting, police found several guns and other tantalizing clues: a manual for snipers and a misspelled note declaring "Gihad in America."
NEWS
By Dan Lamothe and Andrea F. Siegel and Dan Lamothe and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Reporters | April 21, 2007
A Web site that peddles the personal effects of notorious killers has posted for sale a drawing of Osama bin Laden said to be the work of Lee Boyd Malvo, prompting outrage from the families of victims in the 2002 sniper shootings near Washington. The drawing, a cartoonish, black-and-white sketch on a rumpled sheet of paper, appears to depict bin Laden, a shaggy beard falling down his chest. It was posted April 14 on an eBay-like auction site called "murderauc tion.com" by a seller known only as "Redrum," the word "murder" spelled backward.
FEATURES
By Larry Bingham and Larry Bingham,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2002
The morning talk shows were barely over yesterday when Robert K. Ressler - criminologist, retired FBI agent, the man who interviewed Charles Manson, Ted Bundy, Jeffrey Dahmer, John Wayne Gacy and the Son of Sam - decided to stop talking to the media. After five days of being stalked by reporters, the renowned profiler had nothing more to say about the sniper who has killed six people in the suburbs of Washington. He did not want to speculate on motives or state of mind or why the most recent victim was a child.
NEWS
May 24, 1998
Reading by 9The Sun is seeking letters from elementary schoolchildren about their favorite books and reading experiences. Selected letters will be edited and published in the editorial pages.Letters should be no longer than 200 words and should include the name and address of the writer, along with day and evening telephone numbers.Send letters to Letters to the Editor, The Sun, P.O. Box 1377, Baltimore 21278-0001. Our fax number for letters is 410-332-6977. The e-mail address is letteraltsun.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | August 19, 2004
Google Inc., the Internet search engine company that has sparked renewed visions of a technology stock market bonanza for more than a year, is expected to begin trading on the Nasdaq market in the immediate future, possibly as early as today. But the number of shares to be offered to the public has been substantially reduced, and the expected size of the payoff for the Google founders and early investors will be significantly smaller than earlier expectations. Google stock will trade at $85 a share - a far cry from the $135 the company originally was hoping to get. The stock-sale bounty is expected to be more than $1.67 billion, but far less than the nearly $3.5 billion that had been hoped for. Google officials lowered their estimate of the anticipated price and number of shares the company planned to sell in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission yesterday morning, and closed its auction in the afternoon after the SEC gave final approval to the stock sale.
NEWS
By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | March 19, 2006
NEW YORK / / The crime had all the ingredients: the brutal murder of an attractive young woman after a night on the town, her lacerated body dumped along a desolate Brooklyn street; a scramble for clues by harried detectives under heavy pressure to track down the killer; and finally, the emergence of a suspect with a dark, violent past. The rape and killing of Imette St. Guillen on Feb. 25 has sent the New York tabloids into their characteristic frenzy of sensational reporting and shrieking headlines, all but shoving aside most other human concerns.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | July 13, 1999
The killers came and went. Dozens of them, guys who killed out of jealousy, greed, desperation, rage. James F. Shalleck, a Bronx, N.Y., assistant district attorney, could usually talk to them and find some emotion he could understand. None of them quite prepared him for David Berkowitz, also known as the "Son of Sam."They met in the middle of the night on Aug. 11, 1977, in a conference room in police headquarters in lower Manhattan, hours after Berkowitz was arrested. He sat across from Shalleck at a conference table surrounded by detectives and prosecutors.
NEWS
December 10, 1991
Jonathan BerkowitzFitness trainerServices for Jonathan A. Berkowitz, a fitness trainer who never recovered from auto accident injuries suffered about 14 months ago, will be held at 2 p.m. tomorrow at the Leroy M. and Russell C. Witzke Funeral Home, 5555 Twin Knolls Road in Columbia.Mr. Berkowitz died Friday at Deaton Hospital and Medical Center in Baltimore as a result of head injuries received in the accident in Baltimore Oct. 7, 1990. He was 24.He had been a patient in four hospitals since the accident and was at Deaton since July.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2003
Hamlet: Was't Hamlet wrong'd Laertes? Never Hamlet: If Hamlet from himself be ta'en away, And when he's not himself does wrong Laertes, Then Hamlet does it not, Hamlet denies it. Who does it, then? His madness ...- Hamlet, Act V, Scene II Lee Boyd Malvo hopes to go where Patty Hearst, David Berkowitz, Jack Ruby and Andrea Yates could not. Each of those other high-profile defendants pleaded insanity as a defense against grave criminal charges. Each of them failed. Instead of the hospital ward they sought, every one of them ended up in a prison cell.
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