Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDavid Berkowitz
IN THE NEWS

David Berkowitz

FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | July 15, 1992
Conventional wisdom has it that the magazine market is glutted, but we feel Modern Neurotic will find its niche and turn into a money-maker in no time.The thinking here is: Millions of folks experience symptoms of anxiety due to unconscious conflict.Why not give them their own magazine? Why not give them a voice -- and not the little voice that wakes them at 3 in the morning and tells them to go downstairs and check the gas jets again.Our premiere issue was originally scheduled to feature a cover photo of a small, nervous-looking man staring into an open closet and confronting a huge, amorphous cloud labeled "Our Fears."
Advertisement
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2004
On a day when Internet search giant Google Inc. stuck its neck out and placed a $36 billion value on itself - higher than even McDonald's Corp.-many users found its services worthless, shut down by the latest version of the MyDoom virus, which first appeared this year and is spread through seemingly innocent e-mail attachments. The hit came as Google, which downplayed the setback, outlined plans in a filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission to sell 9 percent of its stock - 24.6 million shares - for between $108 and $135 apiece next month in its initial public offering.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | October 27, 2002
This ain't really your life ... really ain't nothin' but a movie. -- Gil Scott-Heron WASHINGTON -- Is it really over? No more choosing a gas station by its distance from the nearest on-ramp? No more selecting the parking space closest to the supermarket door? No more watching the treeline in fear? Hard to believe, but it seems probable. Officials think they've caught the two people who have been terrorizing Washington, Virginia and Maryland for three weeks in a series of random sniper attacks.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2003
Internet shopping - a fast-growing phenomenon but still a sliver of total retailing - might be seeing a breakthrough this holiday shopping season, according to executives and analysts who follow online trends. Various retailers have reported record online sales and Web sites not prepared to handle a surge in traffic. Experts point to various factors, from an increase in high-speed connections in homes to more sophisticated Web sites to shoppers' worries about crowds, fueling the appeal of online shopping.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Staff Writer | August 11, 1993
An Anne Arundel Circuit Court judge ruled yesterday that Maryland's "Son of Sam" law is unconstitutional and that Ronald W. Price may keep profits from any book or movie deal he makes.In the first challenge to the law, Anne Arundel Judge Eugene M. Lerner ruled that it violates Mr. Price's First Amendment free speech rights. The provision is too similar to a New York statute ruled unconstitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1991, Judge Lerner said."We certainly do not mean to suggest in our analysis that we somehow reject the notion that 'crime does not pay,' " the judge wrote in a 17-page decision.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 27, 1995
Some people love the hammer, and some don't. If you're of the former persuasion -- you like a movie that smacks you in the middle of the forehead for a couple of hours -- then you ought to place yourself under "Copycat's" steel mallet. It punishes far more effectively than it entertains.Cleverly, the movie inverts masculine stereotypes. Uncleverly, it reinvents them as feminine stereotypes. Still, the switch is enough to give the film an illusion of freshness.The burnt-out, used-up detective, suffering the DTs when awake and the nightmares of hell when asleep, hiding behind a thousand-yard stare and a fear of all outdoors, is usually played by a guy, beginning with Jimmy Stewart in "Vertigo."
NEWS
By Gordon Livingston | October 11, 2002
NOTHING fascinates and frightens us more than sudden death in all its randomness and inexplicability. We cope with its hovering presence in our lives largely by trying to ignore it. But our fear, however repressed, lurks just below the surface. Our denial is generally equal to the task of coping with death in its accidental and "natural" forms. When death is delivered by our fellow humans, however, we require not just justice but explanation. A sniper with a .223-caliber high-powered rifle is killing people near Washington.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | September 11, 1998
The self-proclaimed capital of good government isn't looking too good these days.In Montgomery County, where candidates issue excruciatingly detailed position papers and everyone is too civilized to be a political boss, campaign talk is centered on marital infidelities, 11 snooping private eyes, Son of Sam and improper leafletting.And that's just the state's attorney's race. Reporters heard County Council candidates "Baldy" and "Fat Boy" -- aka Michael Subin and William O'Neil -- trading personal insults as they left a TV studio.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun reporter | August 12, 2007
As he sat in a Harford County jail cell with his sentencing approaching, convicted killer Charles Eugene Burns wrote a rambling letter to Judge Stephen M. Waldron in which he expressed sorrow for the pain inflicted on the family of his victim, referred to her killer as a "monster" and said she didn't deserve to die. The letters were introduced moments before Burns was sentenced last week to life without parole, offered by prosecutors as evidence that...
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 20, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Taking up an issue of keen interest to victims' rights activists, the Supreme Court agreed yesterday to rule on the constitutionality of states' seizure of the money that a criminal would make by selling a story of crime to a book publisher or movie studio.Thirty-four states and the federal government now have such laws, and the first and broadest of those laws -- New York's -- is at issue in the new appeal involving the mobster's story providing the plot for the book "Wiseguy" and the popular movie "GoodFellas."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.