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David Berkowitz

FEATURES
May 8, 2002
May 8 1541: Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto reached the Mississippi River. 1884: The 33rd president of the United States, Harry S. Truman, was born near Lamar, Mo. 1886: Atlanta pharmacist John Styth Pemberton invented the flavor syrup for "Coca-Cola." 1945: President Truman announced in a radio address that World War II had ended in Europe. 1973: Militant American Indians who'd held the South Dakota hamlet of Wounded Knee for 10 weeks surrendered. 1978: David R. Berkowitz pleaded guilty in a Brooklyn courtroom to the "Son of Sam" killings that had terrified New Yorkers.
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NEWS
By NICK MADIGAN | April 19, 2007
Like Cho Seung-Hui, other mass killers have also reached out to the media. Among them: Dennis Rader: In June 2005, the 60-year-old self-named BTK (Bind, Torture and Kill) serial killer who terrorized the Wichita, Kan., area from the 1970s to the 1990s, pleaded guilty to killing 10 people to satisfy what he said were his sexual fantasies. Rader, who had been president of his Lutheran church council, taunted authorities and the news media with letters and packages. Zodiac Killer: The so-called Zodiac killer murdered five people in San Francisco in 1968 and 1969.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Sun Staff Writer | April 7, 1994
Prompted by the Ronald Price case, the General Assembly moved closer yesterday to fixing Maryland's "Son of Sam" law and helping victims profit when criminals sign movie, book or television deals.The Senate unanimously passed a bill that would prevent criminals from spending the profits of such deals before their victims could be compensated. The proposal goes to the House of Delegates, which is considering a similar measure.The bills were introduced last month after the Maryland Court of Appeals ruled in favor of Price, the former Anne Arundel County teacher who was convicted of sexually abusing three students.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | March 15, 1994
Ronald Price, the Anne Arundel County teacher convicted of sexually abusing three students, does not have to give the state a copy of his contract for a movie or television show about his life, the Maryland Court of Appeals ruled yesterday.The state's highest court ruled unanimously that Maryland's "Son of Sam" law, in requiring a criminal defendant to turn over any contract for his story on demand, would force him to admit criminal activity and violate his constitutional rights against self-incrimination.
NEWS
By Jim Clark | August 10, 1998
ON THIS date in 1776, "E. Pluribus Unum" became the official U.S. motto. It means "one from many." It comes from the poem "Moretum." At the time, the phrase appeared on the cover of Gentleman's Magazine and was well-known in the colonies. It was used on the Great Seal of the United States.In 1787, Wolfgang Mozart completed one of his most famous compositions, "A Little Night Music."In 1779, Louis XVI of France freed the last remaining serfs on royal land.In 1821, Missouri was admitted to the Union as the 24th state.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | November 2, 1991
Last night's "Discovery" concert by members of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and its music director, David Zinman, was the most interesting musical event (so far) of the season. The concert, which was presented in Friedberg Hall at the Peabody Conservatory, let the voices of four interesting composers be heard.Perhaps the most sophisticated and finished of these composers was Tod Machover, whose "Towards the Center" was performed. This is a work that combines the composer's "hyperinstruments" -- in this case computer-extended electronic percussion and keyboard -- with several acoustic instruments.
NEWS
By Arizona Republic | September 10, 1993
WASHINGTON -- To Verna Adcock, it is the final indignity.As she mourned the death of her 22-year-old daughter last year, Ms. Adcock, of Tempe, Ariz., learned that the killer, Curtis Donald McDonnell, was receiving monthly Social Security disability -- even though Congress outlawed Social Security benefits for felons in 1980.Even more troubling to Ms. Adcock was the discovery that McDonnell, who witnesses said shouted racial epithets at the young black woman after he pulled the trigger, remains eligible for benefits even today, while he is confined at the Arizona State Hospital after being found incompetent to stand trial.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2002
Criminal justice researchers have known it for years: Children who hurt and torment animals often grow into adults who assault other people. Many communities, including Howard County, are beginning to acknowledge that link. Some people have taken steps toward dealing with the dangers it presents. "Animals are often the first visible victims of home violence," said Virginia M. Prevas, manager of the First Strike Campaign, administered by the Humane Society of the United States. First Strike is a 5-year-old program aimed at educating the public about the relationship between cruelty to animals and violence against people.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun Film Critic | July 4, 1999
To whom it may concern:This is an open letter to the women who brought what appeared to be two 10- to 12-year-old children to an advance screening of "Summer of Sam" last week.What were you thinking?Maybe you were thinking that, since "Summer of Sam" is being released by Disney, it would be family fare like "Tarzan," the animated blockbuster that was showing across the hall at the Owings Mills cinema.Maybe you missed the posters, the ads and the controversy. Maybe you thought "Summer of Sam" was about a Dr. Seuss character.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | July 15, 1992
Conventional wisdom has it that the magazine market is glutted, but we feel Modern Neurotic will find its niche and turn into a money-maker in no time.The thinking here is: Millions of folks experience symptoms of anxiety due to unconscious conflict.Why not give them their own magazine? Why not give them a voice -- and not the little voice that wakes them at 3 in the morning and tells them to go downstairs and check the gas jets again.Our premiere issue was originally scheduled to feature a cover photo of a small, nervous-looking man staring into an open closet and confronting a huge, amorphous cloud labeled "Our Fears."
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