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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | April 13, 2007
David Arquette and Thomas Jane will appear Sunday at the Senator Theatre for a showing of their movie, The Tripper, with all proceeds going to the theater's preservation fund. Arquette's directorial debut watches as a serial killer obsessed with President Ronald Reagan sets his sights on a concert that has drawn a group of latter-day twentysomething hippie-types. The group includes Jaime King, Elijah Wood, Balthazar Getty and Jason Mewes, while the concert's host is played by Paul Reubens.
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By Jennifer Broadwater | October 17, 2011
1980s fever struck DWTS this week, complete with live performances of "Eternal Flame," "Walk Like an Egyptian" and "Manic Monday" from The Bangles, who also graced the show to promote their NEW album "Sweetheart of the Sun" and tour. Who knew? The theme pretty much ensured this episode would have the worst costumes of the season. And that held true. Neon, crimped hair, side ponytails and lots and lots of eye shadow -- ouch! Consistently nailing it: J.R. Martinez J.R. Martinez danced a fast-paced and technically difficult samba to Gloria Estefan's "Conga.
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FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 7, 2000
About "Ready to Rumble" the less said the better. This cynical, crass non-comedy stars AT&T shill David Arquette as a lunkheaded wrestling fan and, for no good reason whatsoever, Oliver Platt as the tarnished hero he worships. It's difficult to say what's worse -- the movie's general lack of wit, its ham-handed violence, Warner Brothers' appalling cross-promotion of its TNT "Monday Nitro" show, the misuse of Platt and Martin Landau (this is what an Oscar gets you?), the clear contempt the filmmakers have for their audience (wrestlers and their fans are depicted somewhere between snail and slug on the intellectual ladder)
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2011
I am too tired to go crazy about this. And there really are so many hugely more important things going on the world practically every day. But ... I cannot let the addition of HLN host Nancy Grace to the lineup of ABC's "Dancing with the Stars" pass without comment. It is such an exquisite example of how calculating and exploitative prime-time network TV can be. Here is what I find debased about the selection of Grace: She probably got the job and the $500,000 that goes with it because she decided on her own that Casey Anthony was guilty and then, ignoring any sense of respect for the judicial system or fair play, pounded away on Anthony's alleged guilt day and night.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2001
It speaks volumes when: a) a movie has an inane title such as "See Spot Run" and b) David Arquette is its main draw. If you're deducing that it's best to pass on this film, congratulations! You've just won an evening that wasn't wasted on 95 minutes of flat jokes, cheap dog poop humor and the mostly unfunny Arquette. Arquette - who was good in "Never Been Kissed" but is best known for his real-life role of Mr. Courteney Cox - stars as Gordon Smith, an immature Seattle mail carrier who is infatuated with his pretty neighbor Stephanie.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1999
It's hard to imagine Drew Barrymore's never been kissed.Get beyond that, however, and her performance in "Never Been Kissed" should work on you just fine. The film confirms its star's status as America's sweetheart; if there are people out there who don't find Barrymore utterly charming, it's only because they try real hard to feel that way.Too bad the film, about a budding journalist assigned to do an expose on the degradations of high school life, simply isn't worthy of her. The script displays little feel for either newspapers or high school, as though screenwriters Abby Kohn and Mark Silverstein only know what they've seen in movies.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 4, 2000
OK, it's over, can we all go back to our lives now? It seems like just yesterday that "Scream," Wes Craven's wittily self-referential take on the teen slasher movies of the 1970s and 1980s, was becoming a sleeper hit. One just-as-good sequel later we seem to have come to the end of the line, and not a moment too soon. In addition to several other elements -- including funny scripts, an appealing cast of young players and some genuinely scary moments -- the "Scream" franchise is that rare bird in Hollywood that actually knows when to call it quits.
NEWS
By Jennifer Broadwater | October 17, 2011
1980s fever struck DWTS this week, complete with live performances of "Eternal Flame," "Walk Like an Egyptian" and "Manic Monday" from The Bangles, who also graced the show to promote their NEW album "Sweetheart of the Sun" and tour. Who knew? The theme pretty much ensured this episode would have the worst costumes of the season. And that held true. Neon, crimped hair, side ponytails and lots and lots of eye shadow -- ouch! Consistently nailing it: J.R. Martinez J.R. Martinez danced a fast-paced and technically difficult samba to Gloria Estefan's "Conga.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2011
I am too tired to go crazy about this. And there really are so many hugely more important things going on the world practically every day. But ... I cannot let the addition of HLN host Nancy Grace to the lineup of ABC's "Dancing with the Stars" pass without comment. It is such an exquisite example of how calculating and exploitative prime-time network TV can be. Here is what I find debased about the selection of Grace: She probably got the job and the $500,000 that goes with it because she decided on her own that Casey Anthony was guilty and then, ignoring any sense of respect for the judicial system or fair play, pounded away on Anthony's alleged guilt day and night.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1997
"Scream 2" is not going to win any converts, but it's sure going to keep the faithful happy.Like its predecessor, 1996's genre-invigorating and mega-successful "Scream," the film is so self-conscious that it's as much pop-culture quiz as slasher movie. The "Scream" films not only follow horror conventions, they make sure you know they're following those conventions; they're slasher movies starring people who act like they know they're in a slasher movie and not in anything resembling the real world.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | April 13, 2007
David Arquette and Thomas Jane will appear Sunday at the Senator Theatre for a showing of their movie, The Tripper, with all proceeds going to the theater's preservation fund. Arquette's directorial debut watches as a serial killer obsessed with President Ronald Reagan sets his sights on a concert that has drawn a group of latter-day twentysomething hippie-types. The group includes Jaime King, Elijah Wood, Balthazar Getty and Jason Mewes, while the concert's host is played by Paul Reubens.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2001
It speaks volumes when: a) a movie has an inane title such as "See Spot Run" and b) David Arquette is its main draw. If you're deducing that it's best to pass on this film, congratulations! You've just won an evening that wasn't wasted on 95 minutes of flat jokes, cheap dog poop humor and the mostly unfunny Arquette. Arquette - who was good in "Never Been Kissed" but is best known for his real-life role of Mr. Courteney Cox - stars as Gordon Smith, an immature Seattle mail carrier who is infatuated with his pretty neighbor Stephanie.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 7, 2000
About "Ready to Rumble" the less said the better. This cynical, crass non-comedy stars AT&T shill David Arquette as a lunkheaded wrestling fan and, for no good reason whatsoever, Oliver Platt as the tarnished hero he worships. It's difficult to say what's worse -- the movie's general lack of wit, its ham-handed violence, Warner Brothers' appalling cross-promotion of its TNT "Monday Nitro" show, the misuse of Platt and Martin Landau (this is what an Oscar gets you?), the clear contempt the filmmakers have for their audience (wrestlers and their fans are depicted somewhere between snail and slug on the intellectual ladder)
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 4, 2000
OK, it's over, can we all go back to our lives now? It seems like just yesterday that "Scream," Wes Craven's wittily self-referential take on the teen slasher movies of the 1970s and 1980s, was becoming a sleeper hit. One just-as-good sequel later we seem to have come to the end of the line, and not a moment too soon. In addition to several other elements -- including funny scripts, an appealing cast of young players and some genuinely scary moments -- the "Scream" franchise is that rare bird in Hollywood that actually knows when to call it quits.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1999
It's hard to imagine Drew Barrymore's never been kissed.Get beyond that, however, and her performance in "Never Been Kissed" should work on you just fine. The film confirms its star's status as America's sweetheart; if there are people out there who don't find Barrymore utterly charming, it's only because they try real hard to feel that way.Too bad the film, about a budding journalist assigned to do an expose on the degradations of high school life, simply isn't worthy of her. The script displays little feel for either newspapers or high school, as though screenwriters Abby Kohn and Mark Silverstein only know what they've seen in movies.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 10, 2005
Writer-director Robert Rodriguez's The Adventures of Sharkboy and Lavagirl in 3-D, presented as "A Rodriguez Family Movie Based on the Stories and Dreams of Racer Max" (his 7-year-old son), is as sweet and hopeless and silly as a doting dad framing his second-grader's latest finger-painting and calling it a Matisse. A tale of a boy fantasist who discovers his imaginary superhero friends are real, it is no more amusing or compelling than a visit to a distant cousin's rumpus room. Rodriguez showed a gift for rough-and-ready, quick-witted family fare in his first Spy Kids movie; it wrought more funny twists on the "family that slays together, stays together" formula than today's semi-adult opening, Mr. and Mrs. Smith.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jennifer Broadwater | October 18, 2011
"DWTS" showed signs of diversification tonight with a fun performance by a guest krumper. That's standard fare for Fox's "So You Think You Can Dance?" (love that show!) but not what I'm used to on a ballroom show. Another guest performer, Kelly Clarkson, joked about her inability to dance and that she'd turn the show into a comedy. Host Tom Bergeron countered with, "We could teach you. " Hmm, foreshadowing season 14? My anticipated bottom three were: Carson Kressley, Chaz Bono and Nancy Grace.
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