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David Acer

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By Knight-Ridder | December 4, 1990
STUART, Fla. -- A Michigan woman has filed a claim against the estate of dentist David Acer, reserving her right to sue for negligence if tests prove the dentist infected her with the AIDS virus when she was his patient.The claim comes just days after CNA, holder of the dentist's $1 million malpractice insurance policy, rejected a settlement offer from Kimberly Bergalis, 22, the Florida woman whose claim that the dentist infected her with AIDS prompted hundreds of the dentist's former patients to have AIDS tests.
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NEWS
By Providence (R.I.) Journal-Bulletin | December 24, 1991
KIMBERLY BERGALIS died of AIDS at the age of 23. She was not a drug abuser who shared tainted intravenous needles, nor did she ever engage in unsafe sex. All she did was visit her dentist.Little could she have known that by the time she left his office, she would be infected with the AIDS virus that has now taken her life. Her dentist, Dr. David Acer of Stuart, Fla., knew that he had been carrying the AIDS virus for several years.Regrettably, most health-care organizations have joined forces to resist a reasonable proposal that is aimed at minimizing even further the admittedly rare likelihood of similar tragedies in the future.
NEWS
By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | January 23, 1991
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- A Fort Pierce, Fla., woman who is the first person ever to claim that she contracted AIDS from a dentist has won a $1 million settlement from the late dentist's insurance company.Kim Bergalis, 22, got the award yesterday from CNA Insurance Co., which wrote Dr. David Acer's $1 million dental malpractice insurance policy. The settlement came a day before the company's time had expired to contest Bergalis' claims that she contracted AIDS from Acer when he removed her wisdom teeth in December 1987.
NEWS
By Orlando Sentinel | September 12, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Kimberly Bergalis, who is dying from AIDS contracted from her dentist, is coming to Capitol Hill after all.Later this month, Ms. Bergalis, 23, will plead before the Houshealth subcommittee for mandatory AIDS testing of health care workers.The Fort Pierce, Fla., woman originally had been set to testiftoday, but her appearance was postponed until Sept. 26 in what the subcommittee described as a scheduling conflict. The family Monday called the delay an effort to muzzle her.She doesn't know what her future holds, and this is possibly the last time she can openly speak out or at least appear out on what is important to her," George Bergalis, her father, said yesterday.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 25, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A report released yesterday cast doubt on whether a Florida dentist -- accused in a highly publicized case of infecting five patients with the AIDS virus -- actually was responsible for the transmission.But the report, published in the weekly British journal Nature, fell far short of proving that the dentist, Dr. David Acer, who has since died of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, was not the source of the infection."We are not saying that the dentist did not infect the patients -- we're saying you really can't prove it one way or the other," said Ronald W. DeBry, an evolutionary biologist in Florida State University's department of biological science.
NEWS
September 28, 1991
The poignant congressional testimony of Kimberly Bergalis has dramatically underscored the National Commission on AIDS' final report. "My life has been taken away," said the emaciated 23-year-old. "I did nothing wrong, yet I've been made to suffer like this . . ."Aside from the circumstances of Ms. Bergalis' infection, this could have been a mantra for the 120,000 Americans killed by AIDS. Another victim, David Barr of New York's Gay Men's Health Crisis Center, noted that, "Although we may have acquired this virus in different ways, I never asked for this, [either]
NEWS
June 1, 1991
The deaths of two dentists who worked on Maryland penitentiary system inmates brought to the front burner two questions that have simmered in the background of public debate on AIDS: What to do about a prison population believed to have as many as 10 percent of its members infected with the human immunodeficiency virus; and what to do about health-care workers suffering from AIDS.No one knows exactly how many inmates are infected. Corrections officials have resisted testing all inmates, fearing the costs to be incurred in treating large numbers of infected inmates.
NEWS
January 25, 1991
There is a minuscule chance of a doctor catching AIDS through a skin prick while working on an HIV-infected patient: 0.2 percent, according to a Johns Hopkins study. Last month, when reports surfaced that Baltimore surgeon Rudolph Almaraz died of AIDS, less than 40 U.S. health-care workers had contracted the disease at work.That small percentage has not mollified physicians seeking routine disclosure of their patients' HIV status, however. Thus, it is no surprise that the even smaller probability of patients catching AIDS from their doctors failed to reassure many of Dr. Almaraz' patients.
NEWS
By Marlene Cimons and Marlene Cimons,Los Angeles Times | January 11, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A federal investigation has found that three patients of a Florida dentist with AIDS were all infected with strains of the human immunodeficiency virus extremely similar to that of the dentist -- but unlike other strains found in the community -- indicating that they were infected in his office, the Los Angeles Times has learned.The case, expected to be reported next week by the federal Centers for Disease Control, is significant because it has ignited a national controversy over whether HIV-infected health care professionals should be restricted from performing surgery and other invasive procedures.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 26, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Her dying wish was to come to Washington and speak before members of Congress.And this morning, 23-year-old Kimberly Bergalis of Fort Pierce, Fla., her gaunt, weakened body all but destroyed by AIDS, is expected to walk through the doors of a congressional hearing room -- and poignantly, if briefly, make her case."
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