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Davey Johnson

SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Joe Strauss and Roch Kubatko and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1997
Orioles reliever Terry Mathews had been tracking the rumors for weeks from his home in Louisiana, his opinion shifting in various directions. Would manager Davey Johnson return next season, and if not, how would the end come? Each day seemed to bring another twist and turn, and another set of odds, making it nearly impossible to follow."One day it was 50-50, the next I heard he was going to be back, the next I heard he was going to be fired, then I heard it was back to 50-50," Mathews said.
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SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1997
It was difficult to find a smiling Orioles fan in the vicinity of Camden Yards last night. As word spread that manager Davey Johnson had submitted his resignation and team owner Peter Angelos had accepted it, fans were at once shocked and saddened.Asking area residents if they were Orioles fans was asking for a cynical reply. "I try to be," said Thomas Maczka, 21. "I felt like bawling when I heard the news. I think Davey's the best manager we've had except for Earl Weaver."A moment later, Terry Chambers, 26 and the night manager of a local eatery, said, "I used to be. Davey said he wasn't a quitter, but he quit today.
SPORTS
By Mike Littwin and Mike Littwin,SUN STAFF | April 1, 1997
Just so you know, Davey Johnson says he doesn't mind a little conflict in his life, which is a good thing.Because, as you might know, if Davey Johnson doesn't court conflict -- and that is still a matter of debate -- he doesn't exactly run from it either. And, in any case, it seems always to find him."Sometimes," Johnson says of his managerial style, "you have to bump heads to get to know each other better."He says this on a cloudless, perfect Fort Lauderdale afternoon, two weeks before Opening Day, a day so relaxed that a manager would never feel tempted to reach for the Maalox or order up a nerve-calming, post-game cocktail.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Peter Schmuck contributed to this article | November 6, 1997
Millionaire attorney Peter Angelos was viewed as a savior when he spent $173 million to bring the Orioles back under local ownership in August 1993, and he has spent liberally to build a championship-caliber team. But in the process, he also has built a reputation for being a harsh boss.His management style was called into question again yesterday, when successful manager Davey Johnson submitted his resignation after weeks of speculation about his future with the club.Angelos has gone through three managers during his four years as the club's chairman and CEO, even though the team has improved steadily and reached the American League Championship Series the past two seasons.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1997
El Nino is threatening to devastate the planet, the Dow Jones Industrial Average did a bungee-jump that snapped your neck just to watch, and the way they're talking about the flu going around, it might as well be the Ebola virus.But if you're an Orioles fan, that's not what you're discussing around the water cooler today. If you're an O's fan, there are only two topics rattling around in your feverish little brain:1) Will Peter Angelos bring back Davey Johnson?2) Will the O's re-sign Brady Anderson?
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1997
Chances are, the man who replaces departed manager Davey Johnson already is receiving a paycheck from the Orioles. The top two candidates are members of Johnson's 1997 coaching staff.Pitching coach Ray Miller was handpicked by owner Peter Angelos last year to help re-establish the Orioles as a pitching powerhouse, and may be the owner's choice to oversee the entire on-field operation.Hitting coach Rick Down is considered a rising star among baseball insiders, and has been interviewed for several vacant managerial positions over the past two years.
SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1996
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - When they played together for the Orioles in 1971-72, Davey Johnson asked Pat Dobson a lot of questions about pitching, and Dobson's knowledge impressed him.Dobson knew mechanics, offered sound logic in his approach to pitching to hitters, and Johnson thought Dobson possessed a veritable master's degree in the art of throwing a slider. Dobson had to know something about pitching, Johnson figured, because he didn't have a great arm and still figured out a way to win.Every time Johnson interviewed for a managerial job, he thought about hiring Dobson.
SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1996
ANAHEIM, Calif. -- Orioles manager Davey Johnson loves offense, loves power, big numbers, and he had a hard time hiding his glee after his team walloped five homers Monday, and took the major-league lead with 221 homers.The Orioles have 24 games to play and with another home run last night they're only 18 shy of the single-season record for homers, 240, set by the 1961 New York Yankees, who had Roger Maris and Mickey Mantle. The Orioles have hit 16 homers in six games since acquiring Todd Zeile and Pete Incaviglia from Philadelphia, so at the rate of nearly three homers a game, they could approach the Yankees' record in, oh, about a week.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Peter Schmuck, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2012
WASHINGTON - Once considered a key member of the Orioles' young rotation, right-hander Brad Bergesen will be pitching for Triple-A Norfolk on Sunday without a spot on the organization's 40-man roster. That's something he hasn't done in more than four years. "It's been an interesting process, something I've gone through for the first time, kind of the in-limbo phase," said Bergesen, who was taken off the 40-man roster Friday when the Orioles made room for Bill Hall . "There was some unknown, whether I'd be playing for another team … I was kind of on pins and needles.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | December 25, 1997
The willful behavior of hard-living general Ulysses S. Grant had become such an issue during the middle years of the Civil War that Abraham Lincoln was asked by his top advisers why he continued to put up with it.Lincoln summed it up in two words."
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