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By Sloane Brown | March 7, 1999
About 200 cool cats collected at the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall to meet and greet jazz great Dave Brubeck and his Quartet, after a virtual-sellout concert featuring Brubeck and the Baltimore Choral Arts Society.The reception gave fervent fans a chance to chat with the 78-year-old pianist and his band members. Those singing the praises of the jazz genius included Tom Hall, BCAS' music director; Sandra Smith, the group's executive director; and Marc Steiner, WJHU-radio talk-show host.Also instrumental in the post-concert mix: BCAS' ticket committee chair Terry Morganthaler; board members Andrea Bowman-Moore and Mary Miller; J. Bill Murray, First National Bank of Maryland senior VP; Bonnie Adachi and Dr. Taro Adachi, a Baltimore-area OB-GYN; Wendy Brody and Dr. William Brody, president of Johns Hopkins University; and local percussionist Michelle Humphreys.
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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2013
Edward Henry Weiss, a retired marketing executive who put the name Wacky Noodle on a children's flotation device used in swimming pools, died of a stroke Monday at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The Timonium resident was 74. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., he was the son of Sidney Weiss, who owned a printing business, and the former Fannie Brand, a homemaker. As a student at Abraham Lincoln High School, he played the saxophone and clarinet in the school band. He befriended a classmate, a young composer and performer, Neil Sedaka, who wrote hits including "Breaking Up Is Hard To Do. " "In the summer my husband and Neil would go to the Catskills early in the season," said his wife, Susan Pace Weiss.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1996
How absolutely fitting.Dave Brubeck answers the phone in his Connecticut home with the lively sounds of piano music playing in the background.The music sounds terrific, but it is difficult to hear conversation."
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | May 2, 2012
Jazz and classical music come together on the same stage when the Eric Mintel Quartet and the Columbia Pro Cantare join forces for a program of choral works composed by jazz pianist Dave Brubeck on Saturday, May 5 at 8 p.m. in the Jim Rouse Theatre at Wilde Lake High School. Mintel enjoys putting together programs incorporating Brubeck's familiar jazz numbers with less frequently heard sacred choral compositions. That sacred side will be heard at the upcoming concert in four excerpts from "To Hope!
ENTERTAINMENT
By LORI SEARS | October 27, 2005
Take some time out to celebrate Dave Brubeck's 85th birthday at the Murphy Fine Arts Center at Morgan State University Sunday. The musical event "Dave Brubeck's Birthday Bash" will feature performances by the legendary jazz composer/pianist and his quartet, who will be joined by the Baltimore Choral Arts Society's full chorus and orchestra with conductor Tom Hall and the Morgan State University Choir with conductor Eric Conway. The concert will feature a performance of Brubeck's "To Home!
FEATURES
By Karin Remesch | April 21, 1998
The just-announced Baltimore Choral Arts Society's 1998-1999 season includes four subscription concerts, two children's events and a benefit concert with jazz legend Dave Brubeck.Subscription prices range from $65 to $92, and single-ticket prices from $10 to $35. Tickets for children's events are $9. For further information and concert times, call 410-523-7070."An American Afternoon." Nov. 8 at Goucher College's Kraushaar Auditorium. Featuring Randall Thompson's "Frostiana" set to Robert Frost's poetry; Aaron Copland's "Old Americana Songs"; local premiere of Alice Parker's "Songstream" set to poems by Edna St. Vincent Millay; and William Schumann's "Carols of Death."
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 26, 2001
Dave Brubeck walks across the stage with the measured gait of an octogenarian these days, but when he sits at the piano, the years drop away. Such was the case Saturday evening when he and his current jazz quartet joined the Baltimore Choral Arts Society at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall. The concert explored more than his enduring, distinctive playing style, with its rich chords, strong rhythmic punctuation and ability to get a crowd riled up. The largest segment of the program was devoted to one of his ambitious choral projects, "The Gates of Justice," from 1969.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | August 13, 1992
NEW YORK -- The party to be given Saturday night at the Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts in Katonah, for Dave Brubeck by Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel and her husband, Carl Spielvogel, started out as a celebration of the jazz maestro's 60th anniversary in music.But when it turned out that Mr. Brubeck had actually been playing the piano for 66 years, starting at age 5, and professionally for 57 years, no one was particularly perturbed by the discrepancy."We're honoring him because he is the icon of jazz," Ms. Diamonstein-Spielvogel said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | March 22, 2001
Dave Brubeck and the Choral Arts Society Help celebrate jazz legend Dave Brubeck's 80th birthday and the Baltimore Choral Arts Society's 35th anniversary at 8 p.m. Saturday at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St. The highlight of the celebration is the local premier of Brubeck's "The Gates of Justice," a work for brass ensemble, jazz quartet and chorus. The Dave Brubeck Quartet will also perform such jazz classics as "Take Five" and "Blue Rondo a la Turk," and Choral Arts Society director Tom Hall will conduct the group's full chorus in a sampling of choral favorites.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | May 2, 2012
Jazz and classical music come together on the same stage when the Eric Mintel Quartet and the Columbia Pro Cantare join forces for a program of choral works composed by jazz pianist Dave Brubeck on Saturday, May 5 at 8 p.m. in the Jim Rouse Theatre at Wilde Lake High School. Mintel enjoys putting together programs incorporating Brubeck's familiar jazz numbers with less frequently heard sacred choral compositions. That sacred side will be heard at the upcoming concert in four excerpts from "To Hope!
ENTERTAINMENT
By LORI SEARS | October 27, 2005
Take some time out to celebrate Dave Brubeck's 85th birthday at the Murphy Fine Arts Center at Morgan State University Sunday. The musical event "Dave Brubeck's Birthday Bash" will feature performances by the legendary jazz composer/pianist and his quartet, who will be joined by the Baltimore Choral Arts Society's full chorus and orchestra with conductor Tom Hall and the Morgan State University Choir with conductor Eric Conway. The concert will feature a performance of Brubeck's "To Home!
FEATURES
By CARL SCHOETTLER and CARL SCHOETTLER,SUN REPORTER | October 26, 2005
To Hope! A Celebration, the Mass by Dave Brubeck that a small army of singers and musicians will perform Sunday at Morgan State University, almost didn't get written. "I'm not a Catholic. I've never been to a Mass," Brubeck says he told Ed Murray, then the editor of the Catholic magazine Our Sunday Visitor, who pressed him for two years in the late 1970s to write a Mass. "I don't know anything about it. You should get somebody that's really familiar [with it]. "He said: `No, I want somebody who will look at it in a different way and bring a new light to it.'" Brubeck finally gave in. "I told him I'll write three parts of the Mass and you send it to the top Catholic musician that you know would be the most critical and if they like it ... then I'll continue.
SPORTS
By Andy Knobel and By Andy Knobel,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2001
The National Endowment for the Arts and the Recording Association of America recently released its list of the top songs of the past century, and a baseball ditty came in way up at No. 8. "Thank God, I'm a Country Boy," it's not. Thank god. Instead, it's ... drum roll, please - or rather organ music, please ... "Take Me Out to the Ball Game." ESPN.com's Jayson Stark notes that baseball finished 20 spots higher on the list than the Beatles and beat out Bruce Springsteen by 51 places, Elvis Presley by 60 and Bob Dylan by 84. Some baseball people were befuddled by the strong showing of the song written in 1908 by Jack Norworth, who likely never saw a game of base ball (yes, it was two words back then)
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 26, 2001
Dave Brubeck walks across the stage with the measured gait of an octogenarian these days, but when he sits at the piano, the years drop away. Such was the case Saturday evening when he and his current jazz quartet joined the Baltimore Choral Arts Society at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall. The concert explored more than his enduring, distinctive playing style, with its rich chords, strong rhythmic punctuation and ability to get a crowd riled up. The largest segment of the program was devoted to one of his ambitious choral projects, "The Gates of Justice," from 1969.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | March 22, 2001
Dave Brubeck and the Choral Arts Society Help celebrate jazz legend Dave Brubeck's 80th birthday and the Baltimore Choral Arts Society's 35th anniversary at 8 p.m. Saturday at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St. The highlight of the celebration is the local premier of Brubeck's "The Gates of Justice," a work for brass ensemble, jazz quartet and chorus. The Dave Brubeck Quartet will also perform such jazz classics as "Take Five" and "Blue Rondo a la Turk," and Choral Arts Society director Tom Hall will conduct the group's full chorus in a sampling of choral favorites.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | March 7, 1999
About 200 cool cats collected at the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall to meet and greet jazz great Dave Brubeck and his Quartet, after a virtual-sellout concert featuring Brubeck and the Baltimore Choral Arts Society.The reception gave fervent fans a chance to chat with the 78-year-old pianist and his band members. Those singing the praises of the jazz genius included Tom Hall, BCAS' music director; Sandra Smith, the group's executive director; and Marc Steiner, WJHU-radio talk-show host.Also instrumental in the post-concert mix: BCAS' ticket committee chair Terry Morganthaler; board members Andrea Bowman-Moore and Mary Miller; J. Bill Murray, First National Bank of Maryland senior VP; Bonnie Adachi and Dr. Taro Adachi, a Baltimore-area OB-GYN; Wendy Brody and Dr. William Brody, president of Johns Hopkins University; and local percussionist Michelle Humphreys.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2013
Edward Henry Weiss, a retired marketing executive who put the name Wacky Noodle on a children's flotation device used in swimming pools, died of a stroke Monday at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The Timonium resident was 74. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., he was the son of Sidney Weiss, who owned a printing business, and the former Fannie Brand, a homemaker. As a student at Abraham Lincoln High School, he played the saxophone and clarinet in the school band. He befriended a classmate, a young composer and performer, Neil Sedaka, who wrote hits including "Breaking Up Is Hard To Do. " "In the summer my husband and Neil would go to the Catskills early in the season," said his wife, Susan Pace Weiss.
FEATURES
By CARL SCHOETTLER and CARL SCHOETTLER,SUN REPORTER | October 26, 2005
To Hope! A Celebration, the Mass by Dave Brubeck that a small army of singers and musicians will perform Sunday at Morgan State University, almost didn't get written. "I'm not a Catholic. I've never been to a Mass," Brubeck says he told Ed Murray, then the editor of the Catholic magazine Our Sunday Visitor, who pressed him for two years in the late 1970s to write a Mass. "I don't know anything about it. You should get somebody that's really familiar [with it]. "He said: `No, I want somebody who will look at it in a different way and bring a new light to it.'" Brubeck finally gave in. "I told him I'll write three parts of the Mass and you send it to the top Catholic musician that you know would be the most critical and if they like it ... then I'll continue.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1999
Rockin' Rod StewartThe rocker with more lives than a cat, Rod Stewart, brings his pop savvy Tuesday to the Baltimore Arena, 201 W. Baltimore St. The man whose resume includes hits from 1971's "Maggie May" to 1978's "Do Ya Think I'm Sexy?" to 1994's "Having a Party" takes the stage at 8 p.m. Tickets are $45.25 and $65.25. Call 410-481-SEAT.'Bring in 'Da Noise'Loud is laudable when "Bring in 'Da Noise, Bring in 'Da Funk" comes to the Mechanic Theatre at Hopkins Plaza, Tuesday through March 7. The musical, directed by George C. Wolfe and choreographed by Savion Glover, won four Tony Awards for its groundbreaking combination of dance, sound and text.
FEATURES
By Karin Remesch | April 21, 1998
The just-announced Baltimore Choral Arts Society's 1998-1999 season includes four subscription concerts, two children's events and a benefit concert with jazz legend Dave Brubeck.Subscription prices range from $65 to $92, and single-ticket prices from $10 to $35. Tickets for children's events are $9. For further information and concert times, call 410-523-7070."An American Afternoon." Nov. 8 at Goucher College's Kraushaar Auditorium. Featuring Randall Thompson's "Frostiana" set to Robert Frost's poetry; Aaron Copland's "Old Americana Songs"; local premiere of Alice Parker's "Songstream" set to poems by Edna St. Vincent Millay; and William Schumann's "Carols of Death."
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