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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
Evette M. Boykin, a retired paralegal and longtime Northwesr Baltimore resident who worked for the federal government, died June 7 of a stroke at Genesis Health Care-Waldorf Center in Waldorf. She was 59. The daughter of Crosky Belle, a construction worker, and Alfreda Belle, a hospital worker, Evette Marcella Belle was born and raised in Baltimore. She was a 1973 graduate of Frederick Douglass High School. She attended Baltimore City Community College, where she earned a degree in psychology in 1978.
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NEWS
June 12, 2014
Leaning against a wall near a row of vacuums in his store, Morris Weiner winked at one of his customers and smiled mischievously. He nodded in the direction of his daughter, Jeri Cuffley, seated at a desk and gazing intently at a computer screen. "That Jeri, she's no damned good," Weiner said. "She's just a big mess. " Cuffley, however, simply ignored her father. When asked why, she shook her head and responded, "Because I know my father. I've met him once or twice. That's just how he is. " Weiner burst out laughing and shouted, "That's it, Jeri, you're out of the will!"
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2014
Lloyd G. Shackelford, a retired Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. worker and a longtime Lutherville resident, died April 30 of complications from cancer at the Colorado State Veterans Home in Walsenburg. He was 94. The son of Lloyd Russell Shackelford, a building contractor, and Anna Guseman Shackelford, a homemaker, Lloyd Gay Shackelford was born and raised in Grafton, W.Va., where he graduated in 1937 from Grafton High School. Mr. Shackelford was an accomplished draftsman, but the Depression put an end to his dream of studying architecture.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2014
Steven Sugg says that as his family gathered recently for the funeral of his wife, Darlene, he couldn't help but think that the strength of their 17-year-old daughter, Megan, had carried the family through its difficult time. "Megan has kept it together for us," he said. Darlene Sugg, 47, had battled cancer for years, but she wanted to see her daughter, a senior at Glen Burnie High School, graduate before she died. That seemed increasingly unlikely, though, as her health worsened and commencement was still a month away.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2014
Charlotte J. "Jean" Vieta, a former laboratory assistant who later earned a law degree, died May 5 of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, more commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease, at her Monkton home. She was 66. The daughter of William Purdum, an electrical engineer, and Charlotte Purdum, a homemaker, Charlotte Jean Purdum was born in Baltimore and raised at her family's home on Manor Road in Baldwin. After graduating in 1965 from Dulaney High School, she earned a bachelor's degree in biology at what is now Towson University.
FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
Date: March 15 Her story: Kami Scherer, 33, grew up in Arbutus. She is a procurement manager at ThermoChem Recovery International Inc. in Halethorpe. Her parents, Karen and Bill Scherer, live in Pasadena. His story: Jayson Barth, 36, grew up in Woodlawn. He is a sales superintendent for Dvorak LLC electrical contractor in Rosedale and also owns his own electrical business. His parents, Jim and Cetta Barth, live in Pasadena. Their story: Kami and Jayson met through a mutual friend in May 2010.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
Sometimes, late at night, Glennae Williams is startled awake by a crash. "Are you ok, Ma?" she calls to her mother. Her mother, DaVeeda White, has fallen again. She gets up to use the bathroom and her legs collapse, just as they have been collapsing since Glennae was a little girl. "I'm on the floor," White calls back. She knows her daughter will come. These are not the kinds of nights one associates with the last exhausted, exuberant, anxious weeks of college. Williams stays up late cramming for finals and fretting about grades, then rushes off to work in the morning.
NEWS
By Tony Glaros | May 7, 2014
Behind her deep Christian faith and family and friends, Alexis Streets delights in tending to another prize possession. This product, though, is designed to be here one minute and gone the next, lifting sagging hearts and spirits. That's why she is taking her sterling reputation as a businesswoman and is ready to turn the page on a new chapter with the rollout of her shop, Basket Treats by Alexis Streets.   "I have become the dessert trendsetter," declared Alexis Streets, 40, whose sweet spot is at 349 Main Street, in space most recently occupied by the American Justice Institute.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
An Annapolis woman who claimed to be suffering from a "Muslim curse" has been found not criminally responsible in the death of her 2-year-old child last year. Anne Arundel County Circuit Court Judge Ronald A. Silkworth accepted Chelsea Booth's plea of not criminally responsible for second-degree murder last Friday, according to court records. Neighbors told police in February 2013 that they hadn't seen 2-year-old Kassidey Booth with her mother, Chelsea, for a few days. When police questioned Booth, she claimed the girl was with her father, according to court records.
NEWS
SPECIAL TO THE AEGIS | May 6, 2014
Josiah Taft of Edgewood is the first-place winner in a national patriotic essay contest sponsored by the National Society of Colonial Wars Inc. Josiah, the son of Brad and MaryAnn Taft, is 13 years old and in eighth grade. He has been home-schooled for eight years. The society annually sponsors an essay competition open to seventh- and eighth-graders. Essays are 250 to 500 words and are judged on subject matter, interest, spelling and punctuation. Each year a new topic is announced; this year's was Colonial Medicine.
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