Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDaughter
IN THE NEWS

Daughter

NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
Marie E. Scott, a homemaker who enjoyed attending auctions, playing bridge and traveling to France, died of cancer Aug. 27 at her Homeland residence. She was 87. The daughter of George Grant Thomas, a banker, and Marie Elise Donahue Thomas, the former Marie Elise Thomas was born in Philadelphia and moved with her family to Oakenshawe. She graduated from Notre Dame Preparatory School in 1945 and from the Bard Avon School, a Baltimore business and secretarial school, in 1946. In 1947, she went to work as a secretary for a doctor and in the late 1940s, she became secretary to the chairman of the engineering department at the Johns Hopkins University.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2014
Henry B. Mann Jr., a retired Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. marketing manager and World War II veteran, died Aug. 4 of complications from dementia at Envoy of Denton, a nursing home. He was 93. The son of Henry B. Mann Sr., an attorney, and Amelia R. Mann, a homemaker, Henry Bond Mann Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised on Evergreen Avenue in Hamilton. After graduating in 1938 from Polytechnic Institute, Mr. Mann began working for C&P Telephone. In 1942, he enlisted in the Army and served with Company B, 53rd Signal Battalion in Europe.
NEWS
August 17, 2014
A 38-year-old Landover man fatally shot and stabbed his 3-year-old daughter before being killed exchanging gunfire with five Prince George's County police officers and a state trooper on Saturday, officials said. Frederick Roy Miller, of the 8000 block of Allandale Drive, had shot both of the infant's caretakers — her maternal grandfather and great-grandmother — just before 1 p.m. in the 4200 block of Farmer Place when he took off in a car with the infant, police said. The two were in grave condition at a local hospital, police said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
Lester J. Bartholomew, a retired tax accountant, died Saturday at the Presbyterian Home of Maryland in Towson of complications from a fall. He was 100. Lester John Bartholomew was born in Reading, Pa., and later moved with his family to Laurel. He graduated from Laurel High School, where he had been a member of the school's tennis team. He earned a degree in accounting from the University of Baltimore and from the 1940s through the 1970s was a tax accountant and treasurer of the Cannon Shoe Co. Mr. Bartholomew later was a tax accountant for American Totalizator Co. and the Strut Group, a family-owned commercial and residential building firm, from which he retired in 1992.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
A Howard County judge sent Morgan Lane Arnold back to jail from a juvenile facility Monday, ruling that the 16-year-old should be tried as an adult on charges she plotted with her boyfriend to kill her father. Circuit Judge William Tucker told a full courtroom that Arnold, accused of helping plan the May 2013 killing of her father, well-known businessman and blogger Dennis Lane, needs intensive mental health treatment. There's no guarantee she would get it in the five years she might spend in the juvenile system if found guilty, Tucker said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
Frances M. "Peg" Spath, a homemaker who enjoyed vacationing in Ocean City , died July 22 of a stroke at Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury. She was 98. The daughter of Dr. John Milton King, a dentist, and Francesca Heinekamp King, a homemaker, Frances Margaret King was born in Norwich, Conn., and when she was 9, moved with her family to Baltimore. After graduating in 1933 from the old Seton High School, where she played varsity basketball, she went to work as a comptometer operator — using an early adding machine — at the old Esso Oil Co. refinery in Canton.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
Stacy Keibler plans to take a special supplement after she gives birth next month -- a pill made from her placenta. The Rosedale native and host of "Supermarket Superstar" is among a growing number of women who are returning to the ancient practice of consuming the placenta , the organ which nourishes the fetus during pregnancy. Most other mammals eat the placenta immediately after birth, as do many women in some Asian and African cultures.  Some believe that consuming the placenta can ward off postpartum depression, boost energy and speed healing, although few studies have been conducted.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2014
Mary Elizabeth Dyer Corrin, a code-breaker during World War II and former teacher at two Towson-area elementary schools, died June 30 of lung cancer at the Blakehurst retirement community. She was 92. The daughter of Navy Vice Adm. George C. Dyer, Mrs. Corrin was born in Manila in the Philippines; by the time she graduated from high school, she told her family later, she had attended 22 different schools. While her family was stationed in Hawaii, Mrs. Corrin traveled by boat and train to attend Smith College in Massachusetts, where she majored in math.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
Police in New York said they arrested a Dundalk man Thursday for leaving his 2-year-old daughter locked in the car while he shopped at a Marshalls on Long Island. Suffolk County Police said a passerby in the parking lot heard the girl crying from inside the car, where windows were rolled up and temperatures indoors reached an estimated 120 degrees. Police said Melvin Marroquin, the girl's father, returned to the 2000 Nissan Frontier about 10 minutes after authorities arrived at the shopping center in Huntington.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2014
The anxiety began hours after Laurie Bardon Syphard gave birth to her daughter and grew as the weeks ticked by. Was the baby sleeping enough? Was she malnourished? Dehydrated? Syphard became obsessed with the cleanliness of her daughter's baby bottles, cycling through them in a rigid rotation. She worried that a catastrophe would occur each time they left the house. "I would pack and repack the diaper bag eight times and then never leave," she said. The anxiety was so overwhelming that Syphard sometimes struggled to get out of bed. Syphard, 34, knew that her symptoms were more than the typical jitters of a new parent.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.