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NEWS
December 8, 1996
PeopleRonald Hudson of Ellicott City has been appointed director of information technology services in the Johns Hopkins School of Continuing Studies. He will supervise telecommunications and network management, systems development, access to electronic libraries and databases, user support services and computer training, and integration of information systems, resources and services.Pub Date: 12/08/96
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 14, 2000
The Johns Hopkins University will participate in a new national computer grid that will provide researchers with unprecedented computing speed and power. The National Science Foundation said yesterday it would provide $11.9 million for the development of software for the planned $70 million Computational Grid for Physics Networks, or "GriPhyN." GriPhyN will enable researchers at dozens of university "nodes" to share the computer power needed to store and manipulate the vast databases - some measured in quadrillions of bytes - being generated by work in physics and astronomy.
BUSINESS
By Michael J. Himowitz | November 19, 1990
IF YOU'RE AN INVESTOR -- serious or otherwise -- there are hundreds of computer programs on the market designed to help you.Some are little more than stock price trackers and portfolio databases. Others are sophisticated investing tools, allowing you to link up with on-line databases to retrieve the latest information and even buy and sell.For those who see investments as the key to long-term security, it would be hard to find a better investment than Wealth Builder by Money magazine.This $249.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | November 18, 2008
Maryland's senators are seeking answers from federal law enforcement, homeland security and intelligence officials about any information-sharing and contacts with the Maryland State Police regarding a spying operation that mistakenly identified protesters as terrorists in state and federal databases. In a letter yesterday, Sens. Benjamin L. Cardin and Barbara A. Mikulski, both Democrats, noted that cooperation among federal, state and local agencies is "critical" to national security. Nonetheless, they wrote, participants in nonviolent demonstrations should not end up in terrorism databases.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2001
Gene Logic Inc. said yesterday that its first-quarter loss widened despite a 54 percent increase in revenue as it spent heavily to expand its database offerings for scientific customers. The Gaithersburg biological information company said it lost $10.6 million, or 40 cents a share, on revenue of $8.2 million for the three months that ended March 31. That compares with a loss of $6 million, or 25 cents a share, on revenue of $5.3 million in the first quarter of 2000. This year's results include a noncash loss of $1.2 million, or 4 cents a share, stemming from Gene Logic's equity investment in NeuralStem Biopharmaceuticals Ltd., which posted a loss.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 28, 2001
Here are some of the online "picks and shovels" you can use to mine The Deep Web: Allmusic.com, www.allmusic.com - a searchable database of music, artists and musical statistics. All The Web, www.alltheweb.com - a multimedia search tool that includes Napster and ftp searches. BadgerLink, www.dpi.state.wi.us/badgerlink - a gateway for access to more than 4,000 magazines, newsletters and newspapers from two vendors; the databases include many titles in full text. You may need your library card bar-code number.
BUSINESS
December 9, 1998
HCIA Inc., the Baltimore health data company, said yesterday that it has formed a relationship with Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. to develop uses for U.S. health care data collected for the pharmaceutical giant."
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2013
Police departments around the country are collecting DNA in largely unregulated databases, The New York Times reported today, providing a broader look at a practice The Baltimore Sun revealed in Maryland earlier this year. The largest collections of DNA records are held at the state and federal levels, but local agencies are also free to collect their own samples and keep their own records, which are not always subject to the same rules. New York City, for example, has a database of 11,000 suspects and Orange County, Calif., has 90,000 records on file, according to the Times . Baltimore police had samples from more than 2,000 suspects and more than 3,000 homicide victims, The Sun reported in February .  The state's DNA law, which allows the collection of DNA from people arrested in connection with serious crimes and was recently upheld by the Supreme Court , makes no reference to the local databases.
NEWS
July 18, 2004
CAPPS II WILL be delayed and significantly revised, the U.S. Transportation Security Administration announced last week, and that is a notable victory for the rights of Americans to keep their private lives free from sweeping surveillance by government computers every time they get on an airplane. But the battle over government use of invasive data-mining programs to gather reams of information about Americans continues, and much greater vigilance to protect Americans' privacy is still needed.
BUSINESS
By Neill A. Borowski XTC and Neill A. Borowski XTC,Knight-Ridder News Service | April 8, 1991
PHILADELPHIA -- About 25 number crunchers are employed at Wefa Group to dive into the flood of government statistics that the economic forecasting firm must massage for its clients.The company gets the data -- much of it publicly available in raw form -- and runs it through their computers and statistical tests, checking for accuracy and making sure the numbers make sense.Those numbers are blended with other data and then sold to businesses, government agencies and other clients. Some of the firm's products include forecasts, but many include compilations public statistics.
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