Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDatabases
IN THE NEWS

Databases

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Christopher Heaney and Sara Huston Katsanis | July 8, 2010
Valerie Neumann was drugged and raped in 2006, but the DNA her attacker left behind is still untested. Her case is not unusual. Government estimates indicate that hundreds of thousands of rape kits and other evidence linger on laboratory shelves, even though DNA evidence and the FBI's nationwide DNA database of offenders have helped convict thousands of criminals. How widespread is the problem? Earlier this year, Human Rights Watch reported 10,500 untested rape kits in Detroit and another 4,000 in Houston.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
Late last year, medical device maker Zimmer Holdings Inc. made two large payments to Dr. Andrew N. Pollak, chair of the University of Maryland Medical System's orthopedics department. The payments, one for $47,225 and the other for $45,902, were royalties paid to Pollak for work he did at Maryland Shock Trauma Center starting seven years ago in helping develop a clamp known as a fixator that could hold trauma patient's broken bones straight until they were ready for surgical repair.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | July 25, 2006
Most consumers know about credit reports that track how responsibly we handle our finances. But there are plenty of lesser-known databases also keeping tabs on us. And what they report to businesses may be critical to whether we can buy life or homeowner's insurance and at what price. They also may be a key factor in securing a job, apartment or checking account. "The world revolves around risk assessment," said Tena Friery, research director for the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse. "Will you be a good employee?
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
Denise Charrier McQuighan, a database engineer and Johns Hopkins University graduate, died of cancer March 5 at her Gaithersburg home. She was 55. Born Denise Anne Charrier in Cincinnati, she was the daughter of George Charrier, an engineer who lives in Cody, Wyo., and Jacqueline Watson Charrier, a Hunt Valley resident. Mrs. McQuighan was a 1976 graduate of Cincinnati's Western Hills High School and earned a bachelor's degree in mathematical sciences from the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun reporter | February 11, 2008
Anne Arundel County detectives investigating the fatal shooting of a Baltimore man in a neighborhood near Arundel Mills mall last month had two solid leads: In the minutes before his death, according to charging documents, Derrin Davon Thomas had been in contact with someone identified in his cell phone as Dip, and records showed Dip's phone had connected with nearby cell towers at the time of the killing. The next step was to figure out who Dip was. Detectives, tipped off that the shooter might have been from Prince George's County, turned to officers there, who searched a database of nicknames and other identifying features of known criminals and their associates.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1996
The state Department of Education has contracted with a California company to make four major databases available for searches through Sailor, the state's online public information network.Information Access Co., a unit of the Canadian media firm Thomson Corp., will provide general reference, health reference, a general periodicals index and national newspaper index databases to Sailor, which is widely used in Maryland schools and libraries. These databases let users find article indexes and retrieve full texts of articles from magazines, newspapers, reference books and information pamphlets.
BUSINESS
By Timothy Mullaney and Timothy Mullaney,SUN STAFF | January 5, 1997
Digex Inc., the Beltsville-based Internet service provider, has completed its acquisition of Electronic Press Services, a Boston firm that makes software to connect World Wide Web sites to large corporate databases.Terms of the deal were not disclosed. But Digex executives have said the capabilities of EPS' software will help them make more versatile Web sites for customers who want to conduct retail sales or similar businesses online.EPS' 40 employees are expected to continue to work in Boston, Digex said when the deal was announced last month.
NEWS
By Carolyn Melago and Carolyn Melago,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | December 7, 1997
The Howard County library is selling a cutting-edge database service designed to enhance how the knowledge-hungry gather information while chiseling a new niche for area libraries.For $85 a year, 'Round the Clock DataNet can connect library patrons throughout Maryland to 27 business and educational databases 24 hours a day in their homes and offices.Heralded by library administrators as a one-of-a-kind information system, DataNet illustrates the changing role of libraries -- from free purveyors of books and periodicals to sellers of expanded technology used beyond the library's walls.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2003
Two weeks ago, Chris Conover walked away from prison and a life sentence because new DNA testing had disproved prosecutors' contention that two of his hairs were found at the scene of a 1984 double murder. Now, Conover's lawyers and other legal experts are questioning why prosecutors are not taking steps to find out whose hair was, in fact, on the body of 18- year-old Lisa Lynn Brown. This is not the first time defense attorneys have been frustrated by what they see as Baltimore County prosecutors' reluctance to re-examine DNA evidence after it has overturned a conviction.
NEWS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2000
At age 43, with a master's and a law degree under his belt, Phil Marcus took a job selling computers from a storefront. Sure, he could have gotten a fancier job - after all, he had been practicing law for more than a decade and had experience teaching at Towson University. But Marcus wanted to be in the computer business, and a storefront job was one way to do it. Today, Marcus has his own computer business, TTG Services. Run from an office in his Columbia home, the 11-year-old company develops new databases and rebuilds old ones.
NEWS
By C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger | March 24, 2014
As congressman of the 2nd District of Maryland, I am proud to represent the men and women of the National Security Agency. They serve and sacrifice for our country every day, often in dangerous situations, and I applaud them for their work. As the senior Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, I am also proud to oversee the intelligence community on behalf of the American people as a whole, ensuring that our intelligence organizations get the tools necessary to keep us, and our allies safe, while ensuring the highest levels of civil liberty and privacy protection.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2014
Much has been made recently about proposed pay increases for some Maryland's politicians, but even the highest-earning elected officials don't come close to the top of the state-employee income scale. Gov. Martin O'Malley's 2012 income of $150,000 was just a fraction of the $2 million that Terps football coach Randy Edsall and men's basketball coach Mark Turgeon each pulled in, according to an updated state salary database made available by Maryland officials under a Public Information Act request.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2013
Police departments around the country are collecting DNA in largely unregulated databases, The New York Times reported today, providing a broader look at a practice The Baltimore Sun revealed in Maryland earlier this year. The largest collections of DNA records are held at the state and federal levels, but local agencies are also free to collect their own samples and keep their own records, which are not always subject to the same rules. New York City, for example, has a database of 11,000 suspects and Orange County, Calif., has 90,000 records on file, according to the Times . Baltimore police had samples from more than 2,000 suspects and more than 3,000 homicide victims, The Sun reported in February .  The state's DNA law, which allows the collection of DNA from people arrested in connection with serious crimes and was recently upheld by the Supreme Court , makes no reference to the local databases.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2013
A Baltimore police officer accepted cash payments and provided protection for a man she believed to be a drug dealer — a man who was actually working with department investigators and FBI agents to build a criminal case against her, authorities alleged Friday. Ashley Roane, a 25-year-old patrol officer in the Southwestern District, agreed to access law enforcement databases listing informants and other sensitive information for the drug dealer, and provided Social Security numbers to him as part of a scheme to obtain false tax refunds, prosecutors said.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2013
After a three-month delay, Baltimore has resumed posting parking ticket data on OpenBaltimore, the city government's transparency website. Officials gave no explanation for the lengthy delay in updating the site. Nothing had been added to the database since late January. That has changed, and the site now has information for tickets issued as recently as Thursday. Those include citations for parking in a handicapped zone, at an expired meter or too close to a fire hydrant, as well as speed camera tickets.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2013
A former Baltimore Police officer pleaded guilty Thursday to improperly accessing a law enforcement database to provide information to a drug dealer who was under federal investigation. Keith Nowlin, 39, of Laurel, pleaded guilty to one count of accessing a protected computer without authorization. In June 18, 2010, prosecutors say Nowlin, then an officer assigned to the Northeastern District, exchanged text messages with a man named Marvin Mobley, who was being monitored through a wiretap as part of a drug trafficking investigation.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2001
Gene Logic Inc. said yesterday that its loss nearly doubled in the second quarter, despite a 41 percent increase in revenue. The Gaithersburg company reported a second-quarter loss of $9.4 million, or 35 cents a share, on revenue of $9.6 million. In the comparable period last year, Gene Logic lost $4.8 million, or 19 cents a share, on $6.8 million in revenue. Analysts had estimated the company would lose 36 cents a share in the quarter, according to the average estimate of six analysts surveyed by IBES International Inc. Gene Logic shares rose 42 cents to $19.20 on the Nasdaq stock market yesterday - a day when the overall market for biotechnology stocks traded lower.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JOE KILSHEIMER and JOE KILSHEIMER,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 28, 1998
On the Internet, as Martha and the Vandellas would say, you have "nowhere to run to, baby, nowhere to hide."Just ask Norma Mott Tillman, author of "How to Find Almost Anyone, Anywhere" (Rutledge Hill Press, $14.95). A private investigator for more than a decade, Tillman thinks the Internet is the world's greatest tool for locating anyone in the United States.As a gumshoe, Tillman has an enviable record. Over the years, the resident of Nashville, Tenn., has located more than 1,000 missing persons by conventional methods: poring over courthouse records, knocking on doors, wearing out shoe leather.
BUSINESS
Greg Kohn | March 28, 2013
Prepare for a whole lot more numbers. We've added to our collection of property tax databases the information for another county: Howard . This searchable database harbors records reflecting the bills for the tax year ending June 30, 2012. There are a variety of search options (owner name, address, city, etc.). Use the sliders in the advanced search to narrow down the field but be careful - even with 94,479 records, twisting too many knobs may leave you with no results. To view the database in its entirety, simply make a blank search.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.