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By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2014
Having circumnavigated the Americas on his own, Annapolis-based sailor Matt Rutherford has turned his attention to researching plastics' effects on environment Matt Rutherford is more comfortable on water than he is on land. As he sat recently for an interview at the U.S. Sailing Hall of Fame in Annapolis, Rutherford was clearly eager to get the next expedition for his Ocean Research Project underway. Talk about having cabin fever: Rutherford spent much of the winter cooped up in the same 42-foot steel schooner on which he and marine biologist Nicole Trenholm sailed to the Azores last summer to research the effects plastics have on the North Atlantic Gyre, one of the world's five major ocean current systems.
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NEWS
April 10, 2014
This week, America learned what the folks over on Security Boulevard already knew — there's a lot to be learned from Medicare accounting. Medicare paid out $77 billion to health care providers in 2012, according to the long-awaited data coming from the Baltimore-based Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, but some providers received a lot more than others. Not surprisingly, this small exercise in transparency was blasted by some of the high earners who fret that the information can be misleading and unfair.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
An Anne Arundel County man who was found guilty of a burglary based in part on DNA evidence asked a state appellate court Thursday to throw out his conviction, arguing that police improperly kept his genetic information in the database they used to link him to a Coke can from the crime scene. George Varriale, 46, gave a DNA sample to Anne Arundel County police in 2012 as they were investigating a reported rape. The sample did not link him to that crime, but police later used it to place him at the 2008 burglary of a Glen Burnie business.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
The FBI is investigating a former University of Maryland contract worker who said he took College Park administrators' personal information from the campus network and posted online about the stunt to draw attention to major security flaws. David Helkowski said in an interview with The Baltimore Sun that he noticed vulnerabilities months before a February attack exposed nearly 300,000 sensitive records. Frustrated that issues continued even after he raised concerns while working on a university website, Helkowski said, he took the data to raise alarm.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
Environmental regulators gave a key approval to Harbor Point developers Thursday, but said they need to review more data before work that would open a currently-closed toxic waste site can start. The Environmental Protection Agency and the Maryland Department of the Environment approved a plan to monitor air quality during construction, requiring air samples to be taken every 15 minutes on the site, a former chromium plant. Off-site monitoring will continue at the National Aquarium and the Baltimore City Fire Station in Old Town.
NEWS
Leonard Pitts Jr and Leonard Pitts Jr | March 27, 2014
What excuses will they make this time? Meaning that cadre of letters-to-the-editor writers and conservative pundits who so reliably say such stupid things whenever the subject is race. Indeed, race is the third rail of American conscience; to touch it is to be zapped by rationalizations, justifications and lies that defy reason, but that some must embrace to preserve for themselves the fiction of liberty and justice for all. Otherwise, they'd have to face the fact that advantage and disadvantage, health and sickness, wealth and poverty, life and death, are still parceled out according to melanin content of skin.
NEWS
By C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger | March 24, 2014
As congressman of the 2nd District of Maryland, I am proud to represent the men and women of the National Security Agency. They serve and sacrifice for our country every day, often in dangerous situations, and I applaud them for their work. As the senior Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, I am also proud to oversee the intelligence community on behalf of the American people as a whole, ensuring that our intelligence organizations get the tools necessary to keep us, and our allies safe, while ensuring the highest levels of civil liberty and privacy protection.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger, the top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, plans to introduce bipartisan legislation Tuesday that would end the National Security Agency's bulk collection of U.S. telephone and email data - the surveillance program that has drawn fire from privacy advocates, civil libertarians and some lawmakers since it was revealed last year. Under a proposal developed by Ruppersberger and Rep. Mike Rogers , the Republican chairman of the intelligence committee, the government would have to rely on records kept by private telecommunications companies for information now gathered by the National Security Agency.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
Maryland has faced several challenges in fulfilling its $250 million promise to overhaul the way it educates students and evaluates educators, the U.S. Department of Education reported Wednesday. In a report on the state's progress in reaching goals in the third year of the federal Race to the Top program, the department identified the greatest obstacles: implementing the Common Core standards, creating new teacher and principal evaluations, and building new data systems. The department assessed progress in 11 states and the District of Columbia that were among the first to sign on to Race to the Top, a $4.35 billion program created by President Barack Obama to encourage school reforms.
NEWS
By Bill Satterfield | March 14, 2014
In a commentary published March 6 in The Baltimore Sun, Why is O'Malley giving poultry polluters a free ride?, the authors, both of the Food & Water Watch organization, claim that the chicken companies operating on Maryland's Eastern Shore are the "bay's biggest polluters" and that they are getting a free ride on the backs of the taxpayers. Also, they claim that chicken manure, a heavily regulated and locally produced organic fertilizer, is the cause of "massive pollution" of the Chesapeake Bay. The facts speak otherwise.
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