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BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser | April 1, 1991
For Chris Everett, the 6 1/2 years he spent as a Navy pilot were a lot of fun -- when the skies were clear."It got real dicey when the weather went bad," he recalls, "because you had to rely on your instruments."It's much the same in business, says Mr. Everett, partner in charge of consulting services in Price Waterhouse's Baltimore regional office. When tough times set in, businesses become especially dependent on the corporate version of a jet's radar and altimeter -- its information systems.
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NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
Maryland has faced several challenges in fulfilling its $250 million promise to overhaul the way it educates students and evaluates educators, the U.S. Department of Education reported Wednesday. In a report on the state's progress in reaching goals in the third year of the federal Race to the Top program, the department identified the greatest obstacles: implementing the Common Core standards, creating new teacher and principal evaluations, and building new data systems. The department assessed progress in 11 states and the District of Columbia that were among the first to sign on to Race to the Top, a $4.35 billion program created by President Barack Obama to encourage school reforms.
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BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | February 19, 1995
With more than 80 rounds complete in the Federal Communications Commission's biggest radio spectrum auction to date, the bidding for a much-coveted Baltimore-Washington area license has come down to the big boys: AT&T, GTE, the Baby Bells, TDS.TDS?Chicago-based Telephone & Data Systems Inc., operating under the name American Portable Telecommunications, has emerged as a David among the Goliaths struggling for the rights to the market for a new generation of wireless technology called personal communications services (PCS)
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2013
Maryland is among three states flagged by the U.S. Department of Education for significant delays in implementing federal Race to the Top programs in the last two years, namely in overhauling its evaluation system to tie educator effectiveness to student achievement. In state-specific progress reports to be released Friday, officials examined the progress of 12 states that won a large infusion of cash in exchange for committing to drastic and innovative reforms to raise achievement.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2010
Baltimore County school leaders are proposing to spend about half of their $17.4 million in Race to the Top money on technology and increasing the number of Teach for America teachers. In a presentation to the county school board this week, educators said they want to use the funds to pay for $5 million in data systems, including a virtual learning center at Chesapeake High School and developing a virtual high school and games. Another portion of that $5 million would go to developing data systems to track students' performance and to a site now under development that teachers can use to gather curriculum information and individual student data.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
Maryland has faced several challenges in fulfilling its $250 million promise to overhaul the way it educates students and evaluates educators, the U.S. Department of Education reported Wednesday. In a report on the state's progress in reaching goals in the third year of the federal Race to the Top program, the department identified the greatest obstacles: implementing the Common Core standards, creating new teacher and principal evaluations, and building new data systems. The department assessed progress in 11 states and the District of Columbia that were among the first to sign on to Race to the Top, a $4.35 billion program created by President Barack Obama to encourage school reforms.
BUSINESS
July 22, 1997
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has hired a unit of Lockheed Martin Corp. to help plan the nation's air traffic management system for the next century, the company said yesterday.Lockheed Martin Management & Data Systems, of King of Prussia, Pa., will lead a team of corporate units in a contract with a potential value of $45 million over five years.A section of the Bethesda company based in Rockville -- Lockheed Martin Air Traffic Management -- will coordinate the team's research into issues of terminal area and en-route operations.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | January 1, 1993
AUSTIN, Texas -- In ordering the Air Force to terminate a $740 million contract awarded to Zenith Data Systems Corp. for desktop computers, an administrative judge agreed with the losing bidders that Zenith's bid did not comply with the Trade Agreements Act of 1979, as required by the contract.The decision to uphold the protests was made on Dec. 23, but Judge Catherine B. Hyatt of the General Services Administration's Board of Contract Appeals did not disclose her reasoning until late Wednesday.
BUSINESS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe | September 3, 1995
Technology firm makes acquisitionWashington Data Systems Inc., a Landover-based information technology firm, has acquired Medallion Systems Inc. of Rockville.Terms of the agreement were not released.Medallion Systems, an employee-owned software development and sales company, will become a division of Washington Data Systems. President Sheldon "Hap" Ehringer will become division director.Medallion has spent the past two years developing the Medallion Gold Series, a major rewrite of their 10-year-old system.
BUSINESS
By Rick Ratliff and Rick Ratliff,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 25, 1991
For years, one of the greatest ironies about portable computers was that nobody was taking them anywhere.Back in the early 1980s, many of these machines were the size of sewing machines and weighed a hefty 20 pounds. They were called "portable," but they were barely so. "Luggable" was a more accurate description. Consequently, they were carried as rarely as possible. Many people used their portables as desktop computers.By the late 1980s, the situation had improved dramatically. Development of lighter keyboards, disk drives, screens and batteries had slimmed most portables down in size and weight.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2012
Except for a delay in a new teacher-evaluation program, Maryland has made a strong start toward achieving the ambitious school reform goals that won the state a coveted $250 million grant, according to federal officials. Maryland, one of 11 states and the District of Columbia to receive Race to the Top funding in 2010 in exchange for committing to school reform, made strides in several areas in the first year of the four-year grant program, U.S. Department of Education officials said in a progress report to be released Tuesday.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2010
Baltimore County school leaders are proposing to spend about half of their $17.4 million in Race to the Top money on technology and increasing the number of Teach for America teachers. In a presentation to the county school board this week, educators said they want to use the funds to pay for $5 million in data systems, including a virtual learning center at Chesapeake High School and developing a virtual high school and games. Another portion of that $5 million would go to developing data systems to track students' performance and to a site now under development that teachers can use to gather curriculum information and individual student data.
NEWS
By Michael J. Keller | February 19, 2010
In the midst of a state budget crisis, Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposal to establish a system to collect individual-level student statistics from all sectors of education and the work force might not attract much attention. That would be unfortunate, because this initiative could revolutionize policymakers' ability to answer questions at the core of educational effectiveness. The Maryland Longitudinal Data System would make it easier to share information about students across agencies and institutions in the state for the purpose of examining student progress and outcomes over time -- particularly those related to preparation for postsecondary education and employment.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service. | March 30, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Lapses in using a digital medical record system for tracking wounded soldiers have led to medical mistakes and delays in care, and have kept thousands of injured troops from receiving benefits, according to former defense and military medical officials. The Defense Department's inability to get all hospitals to use the system has routinely forced thousands of wounded soldiers to endure long waits for treatment, the officials said, and exposed others to needless testing. The problem might have played a role in the suicide of a soldier last year after he was taken from Iraq to Fort Lewis in Washington state.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV and JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV,SUN REPORTER | August 16, 2006
After a series of delays of key student reports caused by the glitch-prone Student Management System, or SMS, Howard County schools officials now face worries that the program might be discontinued. Chancery Software Ltd., the British Columbia-based SMS provider, was acquired in May by Pearson Education, a New Jersey-based student data programming company. Although officials say that Pearson Education is one of the top companies of its kind, the acquisition has left some uncertainty over the future of SMS. "We are in constant communication with [Pearson Education]
BUSINESS
By M. WILLIAM SALGANIK and M. WILLIAM SALGANIK,SUN REPORTER | July 27, 2006
Columbia-based MedStar Health, a seven-hospital system, announced yesterday that Microsoft is buying its system to organize patient data from a variety of sources and make it available to doctors and nurses in a fraction of a second. For MedStar, it means a chance to see a system created by two of its emergency room doctors at Washington Hospital Center, then expanded over the past decade, get developed more fully by the world's biggest software company, with its vast capabilities and marketing prowess.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2012
Except for a delay in a new teacher-evaluation program, Maryland has made a strong start toward achieving the ambitious school reform goals that won the state a coveted $250 million grant, according to federal officials. Maryland, one of 11 states and the District of Columbia to receive Race to the Top funding in 2010 in exchange for committing to school reform, made strides in several areas in the first year of the four-year grant program, U.S. Department of Education officials said in a progress report to be released Tuesday.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer | May 29, 1993
A former executive in a Lanham-based microcomputer corporation has been charged by the FBI with stealing at least $90,000 in company checks, some of which reportedly were deposited in a Swiss bank account.The FBI said last night that as much as $750,000 in checks may be unaccounted for, although the exact amount won't be determined until an audit is completed by the company, Pulsar ** Data Systems Inc.Jules H. Goodman, 33, of the 500 block of Green Mountain Circle in Columbia, who resigned May 21 from his job as assistant controller of Pulsar, was arrested about 4:30 p.m. yesterday at a parking garage in the 100 block of E. Pratt St., the FBI said.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV and JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV,SUN REPORTER | April 5, 2006
It is relatively new, cost $570,000 to start up, additional money to correct -- and Howard County School employees say it doesn't work. The Student Management System, provided by Burnaby, British Columbia-based Chancery Software Ltd., was suppose to be a faster, more efficient way for schools to record grades and other pertinent achievement data. But because of program glitches, high school report cards have been delayed and employees have spent additional hours working to rectify the problems, resulting in overtime.
NEWS
By Jen DeGregorio and Jen DeGregorio,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2004
When an elderly woman walked into the Howard County General Hospital emergency room a year and a half ago suffering from extremely low blood pressure, Dr. Walt Atha had a hard time figuring out how to treat her. The woman's medical records were not on file because she had never been to the hospital before. "I just had to throw the book at her," Atha said, explaining the various tests he performed before discovering she had a rare disorder called periodic hypokalemia that causes potassium levels and blood pressure to drop dangerously low. "If I knew that," said Atha, "I would have immediately brought an endocrinologist on board."
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