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ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 26, 1998
I have a couple of lists of names and e-mail addresses in text files. Is there any software out there that will compare list A with list B and highlight the duplicates? Is there software that will alphabetize a combined list? We're trying to find a way to eliminate duplications and have a consolidated list.It's a bit complicated, but I suspect hearing it will offer a potent new tool to a great many PC owners.A little-known secret among the world's data droids is how just about any spreadsheet program you care to name offers instant, albeit down-and-dirty, fixes for joining data files.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 20, 2002
I have a 5-year-old computer. I'm ready to get a new, more powerful one. The only thing stopping me is that I don't want to lose any files or programs. Is there a device that makes this transfer easy? If you can afford the luxury, nothing beats having a techie do these transfers at a storefront computer shop or at some of the large consumer electronics stores that offer this service. If you want to do it yourself, I favor the PCsync program from LapLink Inc., of Bothell, Wash. (www.laplink .com)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 20, 2002
I have a 5-year-old computer. I'm ready to get a new, more powerful one. The only thing stopping me is that I don't want to lose any files or programs. Is there a device that makes this transfer easy? If you can afford the luxury, nothing beats having a techie do these transfers at a storefront computer shop or at some of the large consumer electronics stores that offer this service. If you want to do it yourself, I favor the PCsync program from LapLink Inc., of Bothell, Wash. (www.laplink .com)
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and By James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 5, 2001
Can you tell me a way that I can change the size of the various windows that pop up when I click on icons? Whenever I insert a floppy disk in my computer's A: drive and click on the disk's icon, I get a huge window that covers the entire screen. So I have to resize the giant window so that I can see the icons on my desktop at the same time I am working with stuff on the floppy drive. It used to be that these windows were 5 inches by 5 inches, and that was OK. How do I fix this? Windows 98 hides the command you need under a tool called View in the toolbar contained in every window.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and By James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 5, 2001
Can you tell me a way that I can change the size of the various windows that pop up when I click on icons? Whenever I insert a floppy disk in my computer's A: drive and click on the disk's icon, I get a huge window that covers the entire screen. So I have to resize the giant window so that I can see the icons on my desktop at the same time I am working with stuff on the floppy drive. It used to be that these windows were 5 inches by 5 inches, and that was OK. How do I fix this? Windows 98 hides the command you need under a tool called View in the toolbar contained in every window.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | April 12, 1993
In the weeks since Microsoft released DOS 6, I've had a lot of questions about what many users see as black magic: the operating system's alleged ability to double the size of your hard disk.Here's the truth: A hard disk is a hard disk, and it can only store as much raw information as the manufacturer designed it for. If you have a 120-megabyte drive, the standard on many PC's sold today, it can store only 120 million characters of data.But it is possible to compress and encode data so that it takes up less space than it normally would -- like the old peanut brittle can that holds a half-dozen rubber snakes that pop out when you open it. If you can compress your programs and data files so that they only occupy half their normal space, you've effectively doubled the size of your disk drive.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | May 29, 2000
I get a lot of e-mail that begins with the confession, "I know this is a dumb question, but ..." At which point the reader asks a perfectly good question about some aspect of computer technology. I got a bunch of those responses after a column about the "Love Bug" virus, in which I blithely told readers to be on the lookout for e-mail attachments with file names that ended with the extension "VBS." The messages typically began, "I know this is a dumb question, but what's an extension?" That reminded me once again that no infant ever emerged from the womb with a knowledge of Microsoft's operating system, and that many readers had probably never seen an extension in the first place.
BUSINESS
By Michael J. Himowitz | October 6, 1996
MY FRIEND RALPH was on a business trip to New York when his laptop computer went south.First it sputtered, then it stalled. Eventually, it wouldn't start up at all. He began to panic."
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | July 12, 1993
Over the years, I've handed out a lot of advice in this column. Most of it, I hope, is good. But some of it isn't. So I'm 'fessing up to a couple of mistakes.Take the matter of backing up your hard disk. With huge drives that hold hundreds of megabytes as standard equipment today, backups have become difficult and time consuming, if not downright impossible without a tape unit.Still, until recently it was quite possible to protect your most important investment merely by backing up your critical data files -- your financial records, word processing documents, spreadsheets and so on. That's what I advised.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Zeiler and Dave Zeiler,Sun Staff | July 26, 1999
You're certain that your computer's hard drive will never go bad. You're never going to do something so idiotic as accidentally erasing a batch of your most critical data files. You fear no virus.Until it happens to you.Weeks, months or even years of data lost in an instant. And you never bothered to back up your work because you thought it was too much trouble, or you'd rather spend your computing dollars on something that's more "fun."Welcome to the club. Many computer users -- particularly those who bought their first machines in the past couple of years -- have given little thought to making backups.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | May 29, 2000
I get a lot of e-mail that begins with the confession, "I know this is a dumb question, but ..." At which point the reader asks a perfectly good question about some aspect of computer technology. I got a bunch of those responses after a column about the "Love Bug" virus, in which I blithely told readers to be on the lookout for e-mail attachments with file names that ended with the extension "VBS." The messages typically began, "I know this is a dumb question, but what's an extension?" That reminded me once again that no infant ever emerged from the womb with a knowledge of Microsoft's operating system, and that many readers had probably never seen an extension in the first place.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Zeiler and Dave Zeiler,Sun Staff | July 26, 1999
You're certain that your computer's hard drive will never go bad. You're never going to do something so idiotic as accidentally erasing a batch of your most critical data files. You fear no virus.Until it happens to you.Weeks, months or even years of data lost in an instant. And you never bothered to back up your work because you thought it was too much trouble, or you'd rather spend your computing dollars on something that's more "fun."Welcome to the club. Many computer users -- particularly those who bought their first machines in the past couple of years -- have given little thought to making backups.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 26, 1998
I have a couple of lists of names and e-mail addresses in text files. Is there any software out there that will compare list A with list B and highlight the duplicates? Is there software that will alphabetize a combined list? We're trying to find a way to eliminate duplications and have a consolidated list.It's a bit complicated, but I suspect hearing it will offer a potent new tool to a great many PC owners.A little-known secret among the world's data droids is how just about any spreadsheet program you care to name offers instant, albeit down-and-dirty, fixes for joining data files.
BUSINESS
By Michael J. Himowitz | October 6, 1996
MY FRIEND RALPH was on a business trip to New York when his laptop computer went south.First it sputtered, then it stalled. Eventually, it wouldn't start up at all. He began to panic."
NEWS
By Frank Greve and Frank Greve,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | January 20, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In an effort to catch more tax cheats, the Internal Revenue Service plans to vastly expand the secret computer database of information it keeps on virtually all Americans.Likely to be included are credit reports, news stories, tips from informants, and real estate, motor vehicle and child-support records as well as conventional government financial data."Any individual who has business and/or financial activities" can expect upgraded agency computers to put such information before IRS auditors promptly, according to an IRS notice filed last month.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | July 12, 1993
Over the years, I've handed out a lot of advice in this column. Most of it, I hope, is good. But some of it isn't. So I'm 'fessing up to a couple of mistakes.Take the matter of backing up your hard disk. With huge drives that hold hundreds of megabytes as standard equipment today, backups have become difficult and time consuming, if not downright impossible without a tape unit.Still, until recently it was quite possible to protect your most important investment merely by backing up your critical data files -- your financial records, word processing documents, spreadsheets and so on. That's what I advised.
BUSINESS
By Michael J. Himowitz | November 19, 1990
IF YOU'RE AN INVESTOR -- serious or otherwise -- there are hundreds of computer programs on the market designed to help you.Some are little more than stock price trackers and portfolio databases. Others are sophisticated investing tools, allowing you to link up with on-line databases to retrieve the latest information and even buy and sell.For those who see investments as the key to long-term security, it would be hard to find a better investment than Wealth Builder by Money magazine.This $249.
NEWS
By Frank Greve and Frank Greve,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | January 20, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In an effort to catch more tax cheats, the Internal Revenue Service plans to vastly expand the secret computer database of information it keeps on virtually all Americans.Likely to be included are credit reports, news stories, tips from informants, and real estate, motor vehicle and child-support records as well as conventional government financial data."Any individual who has business and/or financial activities" can expect upgraded agency computers to put such information before IRS auditors promptly, according to an IRS notice filed last month.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | April 12, 1993
In the weeks since Microsoft released DOS 6, I've had a lot of questions about what many users see as black magic: the operating system's alleged ability to double the size of your hard disk.Here's the truth: A hard disk is a hard disk, and it can only store as much raw information as the manufacturer designed it for. If you have a 120-megabyte drive, the standard on many PC's sold today, it can store only 120 million characters of data.But it is possible to compress and encode data so that it takes up less space than it normally would -- like the old peanut brittle can that holds a half-dozen rubber snakes that pop out when you open it. If you can compress your programs and data files so that they only occupy half their normal space, you've effectively doubled the size of your disk drive.
BUSINESS
By Michael J. Himowitz | November 19, 1990
IF YOU'RE AN INVESTOR -- serious or otherwise -- there are hundreds of computer programs on the market designed to help you.Some are little more than stock price trackers and portfolio databases. Others are sophisticated investing tools, allowing you to link up with on-line databases to retrieve the latest information and even buy and sell.For those who see investments as the key to long-term security, it would be hard to find a better investment than Wealth Builder by Money magazine.This $249.
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