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Data Collection

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BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | September 30, 1992
A unit of Hughes Aircraft Co. in Prince George's County was selected by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration yesterday to develop the largest satellite data collection system ever built.The project is part of the space agency's scientific study, Mission to Planet Earth. The contract is expected to create about 500 jobs at the Hughes Information Technology Co. in Seabrook over the next decade, said Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, who chairs the Senate Appropriations subcommittee that funds NASA.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger, the top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, plans to introduce bipartisan legislation Tuesday that would end the National Security Agency's bulk collection of U.S. telephone and email data - the surveillance program that has drawn fire from privacy advocates, civil libertarians and some lawmakers since it was revealed last year. Under a proposal developed by Ruppersberger and Rep. Mike Rogers , the Republican chairman of the intelligence committee, the government would have to rely on records kept by private telecommunications companies for information now gathered by the National Security Agency.
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BY ALLAN VOUGHT | October 13, 2011
A study in Harford County could tell farmers if there's enough sustained wind strength to economically generate electricity for their operations. For the past year, a farm in Black Horse, on the northwestern side of the county, has been home to a temporary measuring station, an anemometer perched on a 100-meter tower that captures wind speed and directional data that is in turn stored on a computer. The measuring equipment is owned by the nonprofit Harford County Agricultural Marketing Cooperative, and the data is being collected and analyzed by the Maryland Environmental Service under contract with the cooperative.
NEWS
February 28, 2014
I am writing in outrage over this constant revelation of security breaches involving our most private of data ( "UM forms task force to identify any further data vulnerabilities," Feb. 25). I demand that they pass a law limiting any data collection to the bare minimum needed to complete the current business transaction and that all such data be deleted upon final payment or termination of the business activity. The law should go further in that businesses or institutions must notify the person they are collecting data on exactly what it is they are digitizing and obtain written permission to do so. This week it's the University of Maryland, last week it was Yahoo (who, by the way, never notified me about anything)
NEWS
By John D. Cohen | April 27, 2001
I'M CONFUSED. The Bush administration has promised to end racial profiling as we know it, but its actions would suggest that it really isn't that much of a priority. First, Attorney General John Ashcroft has asked Congress to pass a law within six months that authorizes the Justice Department to pay for and conduct a study that has already been done. Second, in its proposed budget, the administration has drastically reduced funding for the very programs that offer the best prospect to help police replace racial profiling with better targeting of criminals.
NEWS
February 28, 2014
I am writing in outrage over this constant revelation of security breaches involving our most private of data ( "UM forms task force to identify any further data vulnerabilities," Feb. 25). I demand that they pass a law limiting any data collection to the bare minimum needed to complete the current business transaction and that all such data be deleted upon final payment or termination of the business activity. The law should go further in that businesses or institutions must notify the person they are collecting data on exactly what it is they are digitizing and obtain written permission to do so. This week it's the University of Maryland, last week it was Yahoo (who, by the way, never notified me about anything)
NEWS
February 24, 2014
As one who has been working on pesticide legislation for a while as a beekeeper and as president of the Central Maryland Beekeepers Association, I'd say you hit the mark in your recent editorial on the subject ( "Understanding pesticide risks," Feb. 19). The bill that is coming up does only one thing: provide for a $10 per registration surcharge to support data collection. Yet to be defined are what data is collected, who gets to see it and how granular the data will be. Our concern is that the way the data is collected and used will be so diluted as to be useless.
NEWS
May 9, 1998
Gambling debateCan slot machines rescue cash-strapped public schools? Or would expanded gambling create more problems than it solves? We welcome your opinion on this and other current topics.Letters from readers should be no longer than 200 words and should include the name and address of the writer, along with day and evening telephone numbers.Send letters to Letters to the Editor, The Sun, P.O. Box 1377, Baltimore 21278-0001. Our fax number for letters is 410-332-6977. The e-mail address is letteraltsun.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | May 2, 2012
Swabbing the ol' buccal mucosa for the unique genetic code of someone merely arrested for a crime violates that someone's Fourth Amendment protection against unreasonable search and seizure. That's the opinion of the Maryland Court of Appeals, and this ruling has greatly upset police, prosecutors, editorialists and other citizens who see no sense to it. If the cops can take your fingerprints, why shouldn't they be allowed to collect your DNA? We're probably going to need the Supreme Court to settle this issue, and because that court already approved strip searches of just about anyone arrested for anything - even for not paying a traffic fine - it's hard to imagine the justices declaring mouth swabs unconstitutional.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | February 11, 2014
Legislation introduced in the Maryland General Assembly would require state and local officials to refuse to cooperate with the National Security Agency in a wide variety of ways if it continues to collect bulk electronic data without specific warrants. Eight Republicans in the House of Delegates are backing what they call the Fourth Amendment Protection Act, which would punish officials who violate its provisions by removing them from their positions and excluding them from office permanently.
NEWS
February 24, 2014
As one who has been working on pesticide legislation for a while as a beekeeper and as president of the Central Maryland Beekeepers Association, I'd say you hit the mark in your recent editorial on the subject ( "Understanding pesticide risks," Feb. 19). The bill that is coming up does only one thing: provide for a $10 per registration surcharge to support data collection. Yet to be defined are what data is collected, who gets to see it and how granular the data will be. Our concern is that the way the data is collected and used will be so diluted as to be useless.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | February 11, 2014
Legislation introduced in the Maryland General Assembly would require state and local officials to refuse to cooperate with the National Security Agency in a wide variety of ways if it continues to collect bulk electronic data without specific warrants. Eight Republicans in the House of Delegates are backing what they call the Fourth Amendment Protection Act, which would punish officials who violate its provisions by removing them from their positions and excluding them from office permanently.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2013
Southwest Airlines, BWI Marshall's largest carrier, saw a larger-than-usual percentage of flights delayed in recent months — which it blamed on weather conditions along the East Coast. Those federal aviation statistics also showed Southwest had some of the worst on-time rates in America, and BWI ranked below many other major airports for on-time performance. But the data may not be telling the whole story. In a new report, the office of the inspector general at the Department of Transportation found that the agency's flight data "present the public with an incomplete picture of the number of delays that actually occur.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2013
David Simon, the former Baltimore Sun crime reporter and creator of television show "The Wire," has weighed in reports of data collection efforts by the National Security Agency, asking, what's the fuss? In a post on his blog, Simon compares the NSA's counterterrorism efforts to a Baltimore Police Department investigation in the 1980s that formed the basis for the first season of his television show. Police thought that drug traffickers were using payphones and pagers to carry out their business, and rather than develop particular suspects, detectives planned to gather information on calls made using public phones in the city.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | May 2, 2012
Swabbing the ol' buccal mucosa for the unique genetic code of someone merely arrested for a crime violates that someone's Fourth Amendment protection against unreasonable search and seizure. That's the opinion of the Maryland Court of Appeals, and this ruling has greatly upset police, prosecutors, editorialists and other citizens who see no sense to it. If the cops can take your fingerprints, why shouldn't they be allowed to collect your DNA? We're probably going to need the Supreme Court to settle this issue, and because that court already approved strip searches of just about anyone arrested for anything - even for not paying a traffic fine - it's hard to imagine the justices declaring mouth swabs unconstitutional.
EXPLORE
BY ALLAN VOUGHT | October 13, 2011
A study in Harford County could tell farmers if there's enough sustained wind strength to economically generate electricity for their operations. For the past year, a farm in Black Horse, on the northwestern side of the county, has been home to a temporary measuring station, an anemometer perched on a 100-meter tower that captures wind speed and directional data that is in turn stored on a computer. The measuring equipment is owned by the nonprofit Harford County Agricultural Marketing Cooperative, and the data is being collected and analyzed by the Maryland Environmental Service under contract with the cooperative.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie | liz.bowie@baltsun.com | November 28, 2009
Maryland has made significant progress in assembling an educational data system that would allow the state to track every student's experience through the public school system from pre-kindergarten to post-secondary education. In a report released this week, the Data Quality Campaign said that Maryland, which was behind 48 other states in completing its data collection system, has now given each student a unique number, an important step in collecting data that will allow it to eventually link student test data to teacher performance.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
WASHINGTON -- Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger, the top-ranking Democrat on intelligence issues in the House, is proposing to end the bulk collection of telephone data by the National Security Agency -- scaling back a program at the center of the controversy over the reach of government spying. The proposal, which Ruppersberger described as a set of principles, would discontinue the government's collection of the phone data. Instead, intelligence agencies would have to obtain a court order to access similar data already retained by telephone providers, Ruppersberger said in an interview.
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