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BUSINESS
March 10, 2010
The Baltimore Technology Park is building a $5 million expansion that will provide 7,000 square feet of space and support up to six megawatts of power for law firms, educational institutions, health care providers and others seeking data center services. The 30,000-square-foot technology park opened five years ago in the shell of a one-story former whiskey warehouse at 1401 Russell St., just south of M&T Bank Stadium, and now has several dozen customers. Its expansion is scheduled for completion in April.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
A Toshiba data center has moved into the Science + Technology Park at Johns Hopkins, collaborating with the medical institution's radiation oncology department to improve treatment of patients with head and neck or lung cancers. The Toshiba Center for Big Data in Healthcare is based in the East Baltimore research park's Rangos Building at 855 N. Wolfe St. The data center will work with Hopkins researchers to use advanced image analysis and data mining to suggest what outcomes patients could expect from treatment plans based on the outcomes of patients with similar anatomy, physiology, pathology and history.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2012
Baltimore County is set to consolidate its government data center with the school system's next year, which officials say will save up to $4 million in construction costs. The County Council on Monday unanimously approved a proposal by County Executive Kevin Kamenetz to merge the centers. Under the plan, the schools' Department of Technology data center - which has been leasing space in Timonium - will move to the county's data center at the courthouse in Towson by next August. County leaders say combining the centers will save the school system between $2 million and $4 million in construction costs for a new building, plus $100,000 annually in maintenance expenses.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Maryland is in the running for a data storage center with its own sizable power plant, a project planned for the University of Delaware until officials there spiked it amid an uproar over its scale and potential effect on the community. The Data Centers LLC said it's looking in Cecil County and elsewhere in Maryland as well as in Delaware and five other states. The company, which goes by TDC, eventually hopes to build two to three of the projects a year. Now, though, TDC is hunting for land for its inaugural project — which has proved harder to launch than the Pennsylvania firm anticipated.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2012
Baltimore County schools' data center would be combined with the county government's under a proposal by County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, part of an effort to save money through consolidations. Kamenetz and schools Superintendent Dallas Dance said the move would increase government efficiency and free up more money for classroom needs. Officials estimate the move would save the school system between $2 million and $4 million in construction costs for a new data facility, as well as $100,000 in yearly maintenance expenses.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
A Toshiba data center has moved into the Science + Technology Park at Johns Hopkins, collaborating with the medical institution's radiation oncology department to improve treatment of patients with head and neck or lung cancers. The Toshiba Center for Big Data in Healthcare is based in the East Baltimore research park's Rangos Building at 855 N. Wolfe St. The data center will work with Hopkins researchers to use advanced image analysis and data mining to suggest what outcomes patients could expect from treatment plans based on the outcomes of patients with similar anatomy, physiology, pathology and history.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Maryland is in the running for a data storage center with its own sizable power plant, a project planned for the University of Delaware until officials there spiked it amid an uproar over its scale and potential effect on the community. The Data Centers LLC said it's looking in Cecil County and elsewhere in Maryland as well as in Delaware and five other states. The company, which goes by TDC, eventually hopes to build two to three of the projects a year. Now, though, TDC is hunting for land for its inaugural project — which has proved harder to launch than the Pennsylvania firm anticipated.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Staff Writer | March 4, 1992
MCI Communications Corp. announced plans yesterday to build a $150 million computer data center in Perryman to handle order and billing processing for the nation's second-largest long-distance company.The data center, in Harford County, will be on the 36-acre site where MCI has had a major switching center since 1983.MCI uses the existing 48,000-square-foot center to sort and route about 2.3 million long-distance calls a day.Richard T. Liebhaber, an MCI executive vice president, said the company spent a year looking at a dozen cities in the Northeast before deciding on Perryman.
NEWS
February 22, 2009
Perched on a slope just west of Baltimore, near the intersection of Interstate 70 and the Baltimore Beltway, is a sprawling office park that houses the headquarters of the Social Security Administration and its 9,800 workers. Last week, the agency's director sketched out plans for a new $750 million data center to be built within 40 miles of the Woodlawn complex. Most of its funding is from the president's economic stimulus package, and that puts the project on the fast track - a significant asset and economic opportunity for the Baltimore region.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Staff Writer | March 4, 1992
MCI Communications Corp. announced plans yesterday to build a $150 million computer data center in Perryman to handle order and billing processing for the nation's second-largest long-distance company.The data center, about 25 miles northeast of Baltimore in Harford County, will be on the same 36-acre site where MCI has had a major switching center since 1983.MCI uses the existing 48,000-square-foot center to sort and route about 2.3 million long-distance calls a day. It has 82 employees.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2013
The White House remained silent on President Barack Obama's choice of a successor for the commissioner of the Woodlawn-based Social Security Administration, who announced Monday he would step down next month. Michael J. Astrue, an appointee of former President George W. Bush, said he intends to return to Massachusetts after completing his six-year term, which expired earlier this month. It's unclear who will lead the agency when he leaves. "I consider it a great privilege to have led this remarkable agency for six years," Astrue, 56, said in a statement.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2012
Baltimore County is set to consolidate its government data center with the school system's next year, which officials say will save up to $4 million in construction costs. The County Council on Monday unanimously approved a proposal by County Executive Kevin Kamenetz to merge the centers. Under the plan, the schools' Department of Technology data center - which has been leasing space in Timonium - will move to the county's data center at the courthouse in Towson by next August. County leaders say combining the centers will save the school system between $2 million and $4 million in construction costs for a new building, plus $100,000 annually in maintenance expenses.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2012
Baltimore County schools' data center would be combined with the county government's under a proposal by County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, part of an effort to save money through consolidations. Kamenetz and schools Superintendent Dallas Dance said the move would increase government efficiency and free up more money for classroom needs. Officials estimate the move would save the school system between $2 million and $4 million in construction costs for a new data facility, as well as $100,000 in yearly maintenance expenses.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2012
A Beltsville technology company that bought a former department store building in Glen Burnie said this week it plans to convert it into a sprawling data center for government and commercial customers. Privately-held AiNet Corp., which owns and operates data centers and fiber optic networks, bought the former Boscov's department store building at Marley Station Mall in January for $1.6 million from an arm of General Growth Properties. Deepak Jain, AiNet's founder and president, said his company is ramping up operations this spring and summer at the 300,000-square-foot facility.
NEWS
September 4, 2011
There is much excitement in the Frederick County Office of Economic Development these days. Late last month, the federal government purchased vacant land in an industrial park in Urbana on which it will relocate and upgrade the Social Security Administration's data center, currently housed in Woodlawn. The $500 million project is quite a coup for Urbana, a community of fewer than 10,000 people in the midst of rolling farmland off Interstate 270. The relocated data center will not only bring 200 jobs but is expected to generate hundreds more in the private sector.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2010
The Baltimore Technology Park is building a $5 million expansion that will provide 7,000 square feet of space and support up to six megawatts of power for law firms, educational institutions, health care providers and others seeking data center services. The 30,000-square-foot technology park opened five years ago in the shell of a one-story former whiskey warehouse at 1401 Russell St., just south of M&T Bank Stadium, and now has several dozen customers. Its expansion is scheduled for completion in April.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | April 5, 1993
SAN FRANCISCO -- It may be the clearest evidence yet of the humbling of Big Blue.As IBM spent the last two months asking more than 100 industry executives to propose a cure for the weakened computer company, the company's board turned to one of IBM's archest rivals: William H. Gates, chairman of Microsoft Corp.Mr. Gates said in a telephone interview last week that he met several times with IBM officials during their search for a replacement for the former chairman, John F. Akers, including a visit by an IBM board member, Thomas Murphy, to Mr. Gates' office at Microsoft's headquarters in Redmond, Wash.
NEWS
February 22, 2009
Perched on a slope just west of Baltimore, near the intersection of Interstate 70 and the Baltimore Beltway, is a sprawling office park that houses the headquarters of the Social Security Administration and its 9,800 workers. Last week, the agency's director sketched out plans for a new $750 million data center to be built within 40 miles of the Woodlawn complex. Most of its funding is from the president's economic stimulus package, and that puts the project on the fast track - a significant asset and economic opportunity for the Baltimore region.
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