Advertisement
HomeCollectionsData Breach
IN THE NEWS

Data Breach

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 24, 2014
Hackers who stole confidential information on more than 309,000 current and former students and faculty from computers at the University of Maryland College Park last week had to penetrate multiple layers of security to get at the data, and school officials still don't know exactly how they did it or who they were. The sophisticated attack, which compromised Social Security numbers, birth dates, university ID numbers and other personal information, was a stark reminder of how vulnerable the nation's institutions are. School officials moved quickly to respond to the breach, which apparently took place sometime between 4 a.m. and 5 a.m. Tuesday and was discovered by staffers a few hours later.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Consumers who shopped this summer at Shoppers Food & Pharmacy, which has 20 Baltimore-area stores, could have been victims of credit card data theft, owner Supervalu Inc. said. The Minnesota-based retailer, which owns Shoppers and other U.S. supermarket chains such as Farm Fresh and Shop 'n Save, alerted customers it had a breach in the computer network that processes payment cards at some of its stores. Account numbers, expiration dates and/or cardholders' names could have been stolen, although the company has not determined whether any thefts occurred.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay | April 5, 2011
Best Buy. Target. 1-800-Flowers. New York & Company . These are just a sampling of some of the companies that warned consumers this week that their email addresses may have been compromised through Epsilon Data Management , which provides online mail services. The companies are warning consumers that only their email addresses and possibly names would have been exposed. Still, people should be on the lookout for more spam and vigilant against potentially more phishing attempts.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
The FBI is investigating a former University of Maryland contract worker who said he took College Park administrators' personal information from the campus network and posted online about the stunt to draw attention to major security flaws. David Helkowski said in an interview with The Baltimore Sun that he noticed vulnerabilities months before a February attack exposed nearly 300,000 sensitive records. Frustrated that issues continued even after he raised concerns while working on a university website, Helkowski said, he took the data to raise alarm.
NEWS
By Eric Chapman | September 19, 2011
Two recent stories have highlighted how confidential health and patient data are at risk. First, a report from the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Civil Rights noted that nearly 8 million Americans were affected by almost 31,000 health information breaches in the course of a year. Alarmingly, nearly 70 percent of the investigations into data breach incidents that affected 500 people or more remain open. Second, a medical data breach of 20,000 emergency room patients at Stanford Hospital was discovered by a patient after the information had languished online for nearly a year.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2013
A former information technology contract worker had banking information for more than 6,000 current and former Baltimore County employees on his computer, local government officials said Friday. The revelation heightens concerns about public employees' exposure to a data breach that came to light last week as county police investigated an unrelated identity-theft case. Officials previously said county workers' Social Security numbers and other information had been found on the suspect's computer.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2013
Retail giant Target has borne the brunt of bad publicity over a data breach that left millions of credit cards vulnerable to theft this month, but experts say part of the blame rests with the antiquated technology used by U.S. consumers. The United States is one of the last countries to migrate to credit cards with a microprocessor that makes them harder to reproduce than the magnetic strip technology in use today. The so-called EMV cards have been adopted in 80 countries and are widely used in Europe.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2010
A Maryland Department of Human Resources employee was placed on administrative leave after posting the Social Security numbers and other personal information of nearly 3,000 clients of a state agency on a third-party website, a spokeswoman for the agency said. There's no evidence that the information was used for identity theft, said DHR spokeswoman Nancy Lineman, but DHR, which provides benefits such as food stamps and other aid, will offer affected clients a year of credit monitoring.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2014
A week after the University of Maryland learned it was the target of a sophisticated data breach, President Wallace D. Loh said Tuesday that the university would extend free credit protection services to the 309,000 students, alumni and employees affected from the one year it had previously announced to five years. The university discovered last week that the Social Security numbers, birth dates and names of all students, faculty and staff issued a university ID card at College Park and at the Universities at Shady Grove in Rockville since 1998 had been stolen.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
The FBI is investigating a former University of Maryland contract worker who said he took College Park administrators' personal information from the campus network and posted online about the stunt to draw attention to major security flaws. David Helkowski said in an interview with The Baltimore Sun that he noticed vulnerabilities months before a February attack exposed nearly 300,000 sensitive records. Frustrated that issues continued even after he raised concerns while working on a university website, Helkowski said, he took the data to raise alarm.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2014
A week after the University of Maryland learned it was the target of a sophisticated data breach, President Wallace D. Loh said Tuesday that the university would extend free credit protection services to the 309,000 students, alumni and employees affected from the one year it had previously announced to five years. The university discovered last week that the Social Security numbers, birth dates and names of all students, faculty and staff issued a university ID card at College Park and at the Universities at Shady Grove in Rockville since 1998 had been stolen.
NEWS
February 24, 2014
Hackers who stole confidential information on more than 309,000 current and former students and faculty from computers at the University of Maryland College Park last week had to penetrate multiple layers of security to get at the data, and school officials still don't know exactly how they did it or who they were. The sophisticated attack, which compromised Social Security numbers, birth dates, university ID numbers and other personal information, was a stark reminder of how vulnerable the nation's institutions are. School officials moved quickly to respond to the breach, which apparently took place sometime between 4 a.m. and 5 a.m. Tuesday and was discovered by staffers a few hours later.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2013
Retail giant Target has borne the brunt of bad publicity over a data breach that left millions of credit cards vulnerable to theft this month, but experts say part of the blame rests with the antiquated technology used by U.S. consumers. The United States is one of the last countries to migrate to credit cards with a microprocessor that makes them harder to reproduce than the magnetic strip technology in use today. The so-called EMV cards have been adopted in 80 countries and are widely used in Europe.
BUSINESS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun   | December 19, 2013
News that data from about 40 million credit and debit cards might have been stolen from Target shoppers this holiday season has many unnerved. We talked to Eva Velasquez, the CEO of Identity Theft Resource Center, about how to determine whether you have been affected and how protect yourself if you have. I shopped at Target in the past few weeks? What should I do? First, you need to figure out if you are a victim. You should receive a paper notification from Target. They are sending out the letters, but they must doing it in stages because one of the victims is me, and I haven't received a letter yet but others in my office have.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2013
A former information technology contract worker had banking information for more than 6,000 current and former Baltimore County employees on his computer, local government officials said Friday. The revelation heightens concerns about public employees' exposure to a data breach that came to light last week as county police investigated an unrelated identity-theft case. Officials previously said county workers' Social Security numbers and other information had been found on the suspect's computer.
NEWS
By Eric Chapman | September 19, 2011
Two recent stories have highlighted how confidential health and patient data are at risk. First, a report from the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Civil Rights noted that nearly 8 million Americans were affected by almost 31,000 health information breaches in the course of a year. Alarmingly, nearly 70 percent of the investigations into data breach incidents that affected 500 people or more remain open. Second, a medical data breach of 20,000 emergency room patients at Stanford Hospital was discovered by a patient after the information had languished online for nearly a year.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay | liz.kay@baltsun.com | April 3, 2010
A data security breach at a nonprofit student loan company compromised the personal information of 76,939 Maryland residents, according to the identity theft unit of the state attorney general's office. A form of "portable media" was stolen in March from Minnesota-based Education Credit Management Corp. containing data including names, addresses and Social Security numbers for about 3.3 million people nationwide. Under Maryland law, businesses that keep your personal information are required to notify you if that information has been compromised.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay | May 2, 2011
Gamers: how do you feel about Sony's offer of free stuff after hackers accessed the PlayStation network , compromising information including credit card numbers and birthdates? According to Reuters, "Sony said on Sunday it would offer some free content, including 30 days of free membership to a premium service to existing users and in some regions pay credit card-renewal fees. Compensation would only be paid if users suffered damage, it added, without providing details. " One user in the story mentioned never trusting the network with his information again --- only using prepaid cards to access the system in the future.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay | May 2, 2011
Gamers: how do you feel about Sony's offer of free stuff after hackers accessed the PlayStation network , compromising information including credit card numbers and birthdates? According to Reuters, "Sony said on Sunday it would offer some free content, including 30 days of free membership to a premium service to existing users and in some regions pay credit card-renewal fees. Compensation would only be paid if users suffered damage, it added, without providing details. " One user in the story mentioned never trusting the network with his information again --- only using prepaid cards to access the system in the future.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay | April 5, 2011
Best Buy. Target. 1-800-Flowers. New York & Company . These are just a sampling of some of the companies that warned consumers this week that their email addresses may have been compromised through Epsilon Data Management , which provides online mail services. The companies are warning consumers that only their email addresses and possibly names would have been exposed. Still, people should be on the lookout for more spam and vigilant against potentially more phishing attempts.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.