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By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2011
Millennial Media, a Baltimore company that is a rapidly growing player in the mobile advertising industry, said Wednesday it has bought a Washington, D.C.-based mobile startup firm, Condaptive, that specializes in data analysis. Financial details of the deal were not disclosed. Millennial has said in the past that is considering a public stock offering. andrea.walker@baltsun.com Twitter.com/ankwalker
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FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | August 22, 2014
Ever wonder what a sewer "overflow" looks like?  This video by the Baltimore Harbor Waterkeeper shows what happened in multiple places in Baltimore during the near-record downpour of Aug. 12, when six inches of rain fell in a 12-hour time span. That's diluted but raw, untreated sewage spewing out of manhole covers and spraying pedestrians as vehicles pass through it.  The Baltimore city Department of Public Works reported more than 3 million gallons of sewage overflowed from the Patapsco River wastewater treatment plant and in the 1900 block of Falls Road.
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2010
A state committee investigating overuse of cardiac stent procedures in Maryland hospitals expects to complete its data analysis by the end of the month and identify facilities that require further study, representatives said Tuesday during a state legislative briefing. The analysis was spurred by the case of Dr. Mark G. Midei, a cardiologist who has been accused of placing artery-opening stents in hundreds of patients at St. Joseph Medical Center who didn't medically need them. Robert Murray, executive director of the Health Services Cost Review Commission, said he's refined administrative hospital data to better gauge which centers may be installing an unusually high number of stents.
EXPLORE
By Kit Waskom Pollard | October 3, 2013
As a longtime Bel Air resident, Stephanie Hau is determined to help improve Harford County. As a geologist, she is fascinated by applying geographic data to help local jurisdictions better plan and build. Chesapeake Environmental Management, the company she started with her husband in 1993, does both. CEM, which was recently named the fastest-growing woman-owned business in the Baltimore region, has a mission to “apply practical science to improve communities.” CEM projects “run the gamut of all kinds of data collection, data analysis and presenting data in a meaningful way,” says Hau. When a state agency wants to develop a water system, for example, CEM helps the staff evaluate existing data to create the most efficient, effective system.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2002
Last month, Howard school officials unveiled a plan to improve performance in its struggling schools and eliminate a so-called achievement gap. Though it was called "bold" and "audacious" by some, it was a work in progress - more sizzle than steak. Last night, board members and top school officials met to digest the unfolding details of the plan, how it is progressing and what administrators and teachers are saying about it. "The enthusiasm is permeating throughout the county," said Assistant Superintendent Roger Plunkett.
NEWS
April 2, 2012
Every day, stories appear in The Baltimore Sun that are driven by investigative reporting. Some are major data analysis projects, while others are smaller glimpses into how institutions of power operate. This blog will help us highlight the results of those investigations, share primary source documents and give readers a better understanding of how journalists do their jobs.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | August 22, 2014
Ever wonder what a sewer "overflow" looks like?  This video by the Baltimore Harbor Waterkeeper shows what happened in multiple places in Baltimore during the near-record downpour of Aug. 12, when six inches of rain fell in a 12-hour time span. That's diluted but raw, untreated sewage spewing out of manhole covers and spraying pedestrians as vehicles pass through it.  The Baltimore city Department of Public Works reported more than 3 million gallons of sewage overflowed from the Patapsco River wastewater treatment plant and in the 1900 block of Falls Road.
NEWS
October 23, 2011
The Sun's recent editorial on incinerators ("Clean power or dirty air?" Oct. 17). implies that an environmental group's recent report on waste-to-energy (WTE) incinerators exposes new data that Maryland's governor should have utilized to decide not to raise WTE to a Tier 1 renewable energy source. I disagree. The release of this report does not change the landscape of the debate. The report itself merely represents one advocacy group's cherry-picked analysis of a complex issue.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2002
As Howard educators work to determine what is going wrong in the county's five worst-performing elementary schools - where scores on annual state performance exams are among the worst in the state - at least two other schools have emerged as examples of what is going right. Jeffers Hill and Running Brook elementary schools serve populations similar to the schools that are most puzzling to Howard school officials - in particular, the five that posted the county's lowest scores on the latest Maryland School Performance Assessment Program exams: Guilford, Swansfield, Dasher Green, Laurel Woods and Talbott Springs elementaries.
EXPLORE
By Kit Waskom Pollard | October 3, 2013
As a longtime Bel Air resident, Stephanie Hau is determined to help improve Harford County. As a geologist, she is fascinated by applying geographic data to help local jurisdictions better plan and build. Chesapeake Environmental Management, the company she started with her husband in 1993, does both. CEM, which was recently named the fastest-growing woman-owned business in the Baltimore region, has a mission to “apply practical science to improve communities.” CEM projects “run the gamut of all kinds of data collection, data analysis and presenting data in a meaningful way,” says Hau. When a state agency wants to develop a water system, for example, CEM helps the staff evaluate existing data to create the most efficient, effective system.
NEWS
April 2, 2012
Every day, stories appear in The Baltimore Sun that are driven by investigative reporting. Some are major data analysis projects, while others are smaller glimpses into how institutions of power operate. This blog will help us highlight the results of those investigations, share primary source documents and give readers a better understanding of how journalists do their jobs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 29, 2012
Built in part on the premise that even some of the smartest and most savvy news consumers sometimes feel themselves drowning in a sea of information online, the Daily Download aims to be an island of orientation. The online site that debuted last week is part of an important movement among educators and journalists to help citizens find their way online and in social media to the kind of data, context and analysis needed to make informed choices about their lives. The idea is that such sites are crucial to the future of democracy.
NEWS
October 23, 2011
The Sun's recent editorial on incinerators ("Clean power or dirty air?" Oct. 17). implies that an environmental group's recent report on waste-to-energy (WTE) incinerators exposes new data that Maryland's governor should have utilized to decide not to raise WTE to a Tier 1 renewable energy source. I disagree. The release of this report does not change the landscape of the debate. The report itself merely represents one advocacy group's cherry-picked analysis of a complex issue.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2011
Millennial Media, a Baltimore company that is a rapidly growing player in the mobile advertising industry, said Wednesday it has bought a Washington, D.C.-based mobile startup firm, Condaptive, that specializes in data analysis. Financial details of the deal were not disclosed. Millennial has said in the past that is considering a public stock offering. andrea.walker@baltsun.com Twitter.com/ankwalker
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2010
A state committee investigating overuse of cardiac stent procedures in Maryland hospitals expects to complete its data analysis by the end of the month and identify facilities that require further study, representatives said Tuesday during a state legislative briefing. The analysis was spurred by the case of Dr. Mark G. Midei, a cardiologist who has been accused of placing artery-opening stents in hundreds of patients at St. Joseph Medical Center who didn't medically need them. Robert Murray, executive director of the Health Services Cost Review Commission, said he's refined administrative hospital data to better gauge which centers may be installing an unusually high number of stents.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | April 8, 2006
Dear parents or guardians of the students in 11 Baltimore schools now facing heavy-handed treatment from the woman you've cast as the Wicked Witch of the West, state school Superintendent Nancy Grasmick: First things first: I hope you'll forgive the sarcasm dripping from that opening remark. But I'm still steamed at Baltimore's political leaders -- and I use that word leaders guardedly -- who've accused Grasmick of having a political motive for seizing four city high schools and seven middle schools with failing test scores.
NEWS
April 2, 2006
School starting time an unresolved issue I am exhausted by the sheer lack of will on our Anne Arundel County school board to do something about school starting times. I have raged. I have testified. I have sent e-mails. I have written letters to the newspaper. I have gone so far as to actually upset at least one of the members of the board on this issue when I suggested that they should feel shame in their "At-this-time-we-will-do-nothing" attitude. We are clearly receiving the message that it is better to serve the few, rather than the many, and perhaps this is because serving the few is an easy decision.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | April 8, 2006
Dear parents or guardians of the students in 11 Baltimore schools now facing heavy-handed treatment from the woman you've cast as the Wicked Witch of the West, state school Superintendent Nancy Grasmick: First things first: I hope you'll forgive the sarcasm dripping from that opening remark. But I'm still steamed at Baltimore's political leaders -- and I use that word leaders guardedly -- who've accused Grasmick of having a political motive for seizing four city high schools and seven middle schools with failing test scores.
NEWS
April 2, 2006
School starting time an unresolved issue I am exhausted by the sheer lack of will on our Anne Arundel County school board to do something about school starting times. I have raged. I have testified. I have sent e-mails. I have written letters to the newspaper. I have gone so far as to actually upset at least one of the members of the board on this issue when I suggested that they should feel shame in their "At-this-time-we-will-do-nothing" attitude. We are clearly receiving the message that it is better to serve the few, rather than the many, and perhaps this is because serving the few is an easy decision.
NEWS
By MERRILL GOOZNER | December 19, 2005
The specter of researchers hiding damaging data when drug companies financed their clinical trials is once again haunting the medical publishing establishment. Last week, the editors of The New England Journal of Medicine accused Merck-funded researchers of not reporting three deaths in the trial that led to the approval of Vioxx, the pain reliever subsequently pulled from the market because it caused heart attacks in some patients. Medical editors are once again scrambling for better ways to manage these conflicts of interest.
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