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NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | January 4, 1993
Washington. -- It is axiomatic that people who worship the sun will resent people who proclaim the scientific laws of heat. And as long as Americans believe their prosperity is linked to the fortunes of familiar old corporations, Americans will resent the laws of economic change. Consider the case of Sears, Roebuck.Retailing has become rough sledding for Sears, which reportedly is thinking of closing up to 100 of its smaller stores and shrinking its famous ''Big Book'' catalog operations.
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NEWS
By Michael Silverstein | January 29, 1996
PHILADELPHIA -- Politically speaking, environmentalism has been part of a laundry list of good causes since the 1960s.If you thought protecting nature was an important priority, it has long been assumed you also support higher minimum wages, gender parity, lifting up oppressed minorities and kindred causes.But as the reality of a new environmental economics takes hold, such a moral and ego-gratifying synergism faces increasing intellectual challenges.More evolvedYes, greening is certainly a more evolved form of economic behavior that uses energy and raw materials more efficiently, producing less waste (that is to say, less pollution)
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | December 7, 2011
Listen carefully to the Republican debates and you get a view of the kind of society many Republicans seek. The last time we had it was in the Gilded Age of the late 19th century. It was an era when the nation was mesmerized by the doctrine of free enterprise. It was also a time when the ideas of William Graham Sumner, a professor of political and social science at Yale, dominated American social thought. Sumner brought Charles Darwin to America and twisted him into a theory to fit the times.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,Staff Writer | August 2, 1993
Less than a day after tagging Red Sox ace Roger Clemens for four runs on 10 hits, the Orioles ran into Boston's real 1993 stopper, Danny Darwin."He's been outstanding for us. If you could name an MVP for the first half of the season, he would be it," said Red Sox manager Butch Hobson, whose team is 1 1/2 games behind the first-place Toronto Blue Jays. "Plus, the guys enjoy playing behind him."Allowing one run and four hits through 6 1/3 innings yesterday, the right-hander er defeated the Orioles, 2-1. Darwin's 10th victory tops a staff that leads the American league in ERA and fewest hits surrendered.
FEATURES
By STEVE MCKERROW and STEVE MCKERROW,SUN STAFF | October 18, 1995
How do you get to Carnegie Hall? Practice, practice goes the answer to the old joke. But PBS tonight offers another way: a "Great Performances" season premiere from the premier New York concert hall.* "The New Explorers: What Darwin Never Saw" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67) -- Premiering for a 13th season, the science show profiles two evolutionary biologists from Princeton University, Peter and Rosemary Grant, who have been following in Darwin's footsteps in the Galapagos Islands.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Foreign Reporter | January 3, 2007
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia -- This nation's first-ever lawsuit on Charles Darwin's theory of evolution began with a biology textbook, a bunch of bananas and a man dressed in a monkey suit. And it only got more tangled from there. The student who brought the case, saying the teaching of evolution offends her religion, has accused her school of trying to flunk her as punishment for speaking up. The principal has suggested that the girl and her family are not being driven by devout beliefs, but by a push for publicity.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Stroh and By Michael Stroh,Sun Staff | December 22, 2002
Darwin's Blind Spot: Evolution Beyond Natural Selection, by Frank Ryan. Houghton Mifflin, 310 pages, $25. There is a species of hermit crab that scuttles around with a pink anemone atop its shell. If an octopus or other predator approaches the crab, the anemone jabs it with a poisoned tentacle, scaring off the would-be assailant. In return for playing bodyguard, the anemone is permitted to piggyback and feast on the crab's leftovers and excrement. One can debate the equity of this deal.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,OriolesStaff Writer | May 13, 1993
Orioles manager Johnny Oates was all smiles before last night's series finale against the Boston Red Sox, and he made no secret of the reason."I'm just glad we don't have to face Roger Clemens again tonight," he said. "That's the first thing I thought about when I got up this morning. . . . I hope they don't try to send him out there again."But Oates spoke -- and joked -- a little too soon.The Red Sox sent Danny Darwin instead, and the Orioles had nothing to smile about after the veteran right-hander held them to two hits over 7 2/3 innings on the way to a 2-0 victory at Camden Yards.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,OriolesStaff Writer | May 13, 1993
The Fernando Valenzuela experiment has been an unqualified success, unless you want to get technical about it.Valenzuela has turned in three straight solid performances, but the Orioles have yet to win a game in which he has appeared. He pitched a strong 8 1/3 innings last night, but the Boston Red Sox scored a 2-0 victory and shut out the Orioles for the second night in a row.Right-hander Danny Darwin picked up right where Roger Clemens left off the night before, taking a one-hitter into the eighth inning before sharing the two-hit shutout with relievers Greg Harris and Jeff Russell.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 6, 1996
LONDON -- Fifty-two years ago today, Dr. Vernon B. Mountcastle was a military surgeon on a ship just off the French coast, tending to soldiers who had been wounded storming Utah Beach on D-Day.Today, Mountcastle, a Johns Hopkins University professor emeritus of neuroscience who has worked to unravel the mysteries of the brain, is back in Europe to be admitted to Britain's prestigious Royal Society.The independent scientific academy was founded in 1660, granted a charter by Charles II in 1662 and sustained for centuries by the motto "Nullius in verba," which can be translated as "Take nobody's word for it."
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