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By John Darnton | September 25, 2005
Some years back, I was given a tour of Down House, Charles Darwin's country estate near London, and allowed to sit in the special chair in which he wrote The Origin of Species and other revolutionary works. The chair was one he had devised himself: High-backed, stuffed with horsehair, it had casters attached so that he could scoot around his study to reach his books, his working table and his microscope. He had fashioned a cloth-covered board to fit over the arms as a writing surface. Once ensconced there, with the board lowered in place, I felt an indescribable thrill, like a child settling into the swing at a country fair when the bar descends to lock him in place.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2011
Earle Havens can almost hear their voices. Each time Havens steps inside the George Peabody Library, he senses the muted exclamations, the murmured back-and-forth of a conversation that's been going on now for more than two millennia. In one corner, there's a treatise from the third century B.C. in which Aristarchus of Samos estimated the distances between the sun, moon and earth. Across the room is an extremely rare unbound volume of Copernicus' "Revolution of the Celestial Spheres," in which the 15th-century astronomer advanced the then-heretical notion that the Earth was not the center of the universe.
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NEWS
June 3, 2009
On May 30, 2009, DARWIN WARREN WILSON; beloved husband of Mildred Wilson. On Thursday, friends may call at VAUGHN C. GREENE FUNERAL SERVICES (RANDALLSTOWN), 8728 Liberty Road from 5 to 8 P.M. On Friday, Mr. Wilson will lie in state at Gospel Tabernacle Baptist Church, 3100 Walbrook Avenue, where the family will receive friends 10 to 11 A.M with services to follow. Inquires to (410) 655-0015.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | December 7, 2011
Listen carefully to the Republican debates and you get a view of the kind of society many Republicans seek. The last time we had it was in the Gilded Age of the late 19th century. It was an era when the nation was mesmerized by the doctrine of free enterprise. It was also a time when the ideas of William Graham Sumner, a professor of political and social science at Yale, dominated American social thought. Sumner brought Charles Darwin to America and twisted him into a theory to fit the times.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Sun Staff Writer | May 7, 1995
When the Toronto Blue Jays signed Danny Darwin on April 11, it took up a couple of agate lines in the transactions column of newspapers around the country. In other words, you had to be paying close attention to even notice.The still defending World Series champions had picked up a marquee pitcher when they traded for David Cone. The New York Yankees had previously traded for Jack McDowell. The Orioles countered those moves by adding free agent Kevin Brown as the top American League East contenders jockeyed for pitching superiority.
SPORTS
December 20, 1990
Free-agent pitcher Danny Darwin, who led the National League in ERA last season for the Houston Astros, signed a four-year contract yesterday with the Boston Red Sox.Terms of the contract were not disclosed by the Red Sox, but Darwin's agent, Randy Hendricks, said the agreement was worth a possible $12.2 million.Darwin, who received a $1 million bonus for signing, will earn a total of $6 million in 1991 and 1992 and a combined $4.8 million for 1993 and 1994, bringing the package to $11.8 million, Hendricks said.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | May 10, 2005
WASHINGTON - At a time when America's children need to learn how to compete with India, Ireland and other countries to which we are rapidly losing jobs, some Americans would rather fuss and fret about whether man evolved from the apes. That's what I imagine the master lawyer Clarence Darrow would be saying if he were around to redefend Charles Darwin's theory of evolution against today's new version of creationism. I'm sure Mr. Darrow would be amazed and amused at last week's events in Topeka, Kan. Eighty years after his famous defendant, John Scopes, was arrested for teaching evolution in Tennessee public schools, the Kansas Board of Education opened hearings in Topeka to hear new challenges to the teaching of Darwin.
FEATURES
By LINDSAY KISHTER and LINDSAY KISHTER,SUN REPORTER | July 22, 2006
The eight women form two parallel lines in the deep end of Riverside Park Pool, gracefully spinning in time to the chants of director Emily Burtt. "One, two, three, four," she counts. "Nice toes. Keep those toes real pointy." Soon, the colorful caps, lizard tails and starfish suits on the swimmers make it clear this isn't your grandmother's water aerobics. The swimmers are rehearsing a scene from It's a Wonderful Species, this year's water ballet from Baltimore-based performance group Fluid Movement.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | June 9, 1997
CHICAGO -- So what if the Orioles have scored five runs while stranding the entire South Side in three games. A slump is in the eye of the hitter, and Roberto Alomar sees no slumps.Doing his best to jack the Orioles from their most pronounced offensive funk of the season, Alomar made the most of yesterday's reunion with Chicago White Sox starter Danny Darwin. While Darwin's underpowered but well-placed assortment represents kryptonite to most of the Orioles' superbats, he is putty to Alomar.
NEWS
By MICHAEL HILL and MICHAEL HILL,SUN REPORTER | December 18, 2005
What is it about evolution? Over the centuries, there have been many scientific findings that have differed from religious beliefs, causing all sorts of controversy. But evidence accumulated and the faithful came around, agreeing with near-unanimity that the Earth revolved around the sun and not vice versa, or that people with mental illnesses were not possessed by demons. That has not happened with evolution. Though in the century and a half since the publication of The Origin of Species virtually every biologist has concluded that Darwin got it essentially right, many still refuse to agree.
NEWS
June 3, 2011
Thank you very much for the editorial about my recent experience with police at the Inner Harbor ("Free Speech in the Inner Harbor," June 2). Just to be clear: My friends and I, all Baltimore citizens, were simply providing information to Inner Harbor visitors about the fact that eating meat violates an ethical principle in which almost all Americans believe — compassion toward animals. According to Gallup, 96 percent of Americans believe that animals should be legally protected from cruelty.
NEWS
June 3, 2009
On May 30, 2009, DARWIN WARREN WILSON; beloved husband of Mildred Wilson. On Thursday, friends may call at VAUGHN C. GREENE FUNERAL SERVICES (RANDALLSTOWN), 8728 Liberty Road from 5 to 8 P.M. On Friday, Mr. Wilson will lie in state at Gospel Tabernacle Baptist Church, 3100 Walbrook Avenue, where the family will receive friends 10 to 11 A.M with services to follow. Inquires to (410) 655-0015.
NEWS
February 12, 2009
It's a curiosity of history: Two men whose deeds and words greatly influenced the course of social thought were born hours apart on Feb. 12, 1809 - 200 years ago today. Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species, published in 1859, challenged millennia-old assumptions about the nature of humanity and the role of religion; a year later and a continent away, Abraham Lincoln's election triggered events that tested our young nation's survival and led to the end of slavery. The 16th president never goes out of style; a search of "Abraham Lincoln" on Amazon.
NEWS
By Karen Kaplan and Karen Kaplan,Los Angeles Times | February 8, 2009
Blue eyes are typically associated with beauty, or perhaps Frank Sinatra. But to University of Wisconsin anthropologist John Hawks, they represent an evolutionary mystery. For nearly all of human history, everyone in the world had brown eyes. Then, between 6,000 and 10,000 years ago, the first blue-eyed baby was born somewhere near the Black Sea. For some reason, that baby's descendants gained a 5 percent evolutionary advantage over their brown-eyed competitors, and today the number of people with blue eyes tops half a billion.
NEWS
February 2, 2009
Man found stabbed in Southwest Baltimore dies A man was found stabbed in South Baltimore early yesterday and later died at Maryland Shock Trauma Center, city police said. Baltimore police found the man at 6:54 a.m. in the 200 block of W. Dickman St., said Officer Troy Harris, a police spokesman. The unidentified man was taken to Shock Trauma, where he died about 8:30 a.m. yesterday. Police said they had no suspects and knew of no motive for the killing. Nicole Fuller Fire destroys home in Fallston; no one hurt Fire destroyed a 12,000-square-foot home in Fallston late Saturday night while the residents were away, authorities said yesterday.
NEWS
By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | January 8, 2009
No dumbo celebs being celebrated here. Just dumbo regular folk. The black comedy The Darwin Awards is a 2006 film with Joseph Fiennes, Winona Ryder and Josh Charles that was inspired by the cult Web site of the same name, which chronicles "the improvement of the human genome by honoring those who accidentally kill themselves in really stupid ways." Endless sick humor at darwinawards.com. (9:35 p.m, Showtime) Feeding frenzy:: Tonight the folks at The Office get some good news, but they still find a way to make a mess of things.
TRAVEL
By Tui De Roy and Tui De Roy,Special to the Sun | November 14, 1999
I was only 2 years old when my parents left war-ravaged Belgium in 1955 to seek a new life. They arrived in the Galapagos Islands when almost no one knew the islands even existed and raised they their two children in the midst of nature.My earliest memories are of sunshine and endless beaches marked only by the footprints of turtles and seabirds, of diving among sea lions in search of abundant lobsters, of climbing volcanoes and helping my father hunt wild goats for the dinner table.I wore no shoes and few clothes, knew no electricity or running water, saw my first automobile when I was 10. But life was rich beyond measure.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker | May 5, 1992
On Sunday, a fisherman aboard Capt. Ed Darwin's charter boat Becky D caught a 56-inch rockfish that the Department of Natural Resources estimated would weigh between 75 and 80 pounds.The fisherman, Chris Frederick of Catonsville, asked that the fish, which had yet to spawn, be released after Darwin had recorded its length and girth.The Maryland record for striped bass caught in the Chesapeake Bay is 55 pounds. The Maryland ocean record is 54 pounds and the East Coast record is 78 pounds.Frederick brought in the fish because his friend, Renne Bowman, had politely offered his rod when the strike was made.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,sun reporter | July 8, 2007
The Andersen family's turtles are cold-blooded competitors. Speedy, a red-nosed slider, won the first heat by a red nose yesterday at the 66th annual Chesapeake Turtle Derby in Patterson Park. The next race went to the Bel Air family's other slider, Claude. "One of them always wins," Charlie Andersen said of the turtles. "It's almost embarrassing. We've got probably 10 trophies from turtle races at our house."
NEWS
By KATHLEEN PARKER | May 14, 2007
WASHINGTON -- In a nation where 91 percent of citizens profess to believe in God, it's a safe bet we won't see an atheist in the White House anytime soon. But what about a president who doesn't believe in Darwin? And are Darwin and God mutually exclusive? These are the questions that (still) trouble men's souls. And still cause trouble for presidential candidates forced unfairly to essentially choose between God and science. In the "gotcha" question of the first GOP debate, journalist Jim VandeHei, relaying a citizen's question, asked John McCain: "Do you believe in evolution?"
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