Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDarrow
IN THE NEWS

Darrow

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 12, 2007
On August 3, 2007, IRIS I. DARROW; beloved daughter of the late Florance Anderson and the late Albert Darrow as well as the late stepfather of John H. Anderson, died after a short illness with cancer. Iris is also survived by her brother Allan M. Darrow and his wife Julia A., John S. Anderson, stepbrother Jay Orash; stepsister, Laura Chadwick and the late Michael Orash. Iris also has four nieces and four nephews. Iris is a 1965 graduate of Southern High School in Baltimore. Iris was a long time employee of F.M.C.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2010
At a couple of points in "A Passion for Justice," the engrossing one-man play about Clarence Darrow on the boards at Everyman Theatre, the famed lawyer reminds his listeners that "history repeats itself — that is one of the problems with history." Paul Morella, who co-wrote the play with Jack Marshall, delivers those words in a slightly world-weary way that speaks volumes about the cases and causes that occupied Darrow. From his efforts on behalf of organized labor and victims of racial hatred (the jurors "were prejudiced and they rose above it")
Advertisement
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2004
Bernadette "Bee" Baldwin Darrow, who owned a Severna Park arts and crafts supplies shop for nearly two decades, died Saturday of complications from Alzheimer's disease at her home in Sunrise Assisted Living in Severna Park. She was 76. Bernadette Baldwin was born in Annapolis and graduated from St. Joseph's High School, a boarding school in Emmitsburg. She attended Dunbarton College in Washington for two years. In 1948, she married Paul Darrow, who was then a graduate student at Georgetown University.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2010
Clarence Darrow had a carefully cultivated, aw-shucks persona that barely concealed an abrasive core. As a defense attorney, he was caught red-handed trying to bribe a juror to acquit two brothers accused of a bombing in which 21 people died. He treated the women in his life with callous disregard. It's an unlikely biography for a great American hero. "Performing this role is like peeling an onion," says actor Paul Morella. "After 10 years, I've just scratched the surface."
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | June 6, 1991
Every BMW-driving, yuppified, will-I-make-partner-obsessed lawyer in America ought to be forced to sit before a TV set for a couple of hours tomorrow night.Tune it to PBS' "American Playhouse" and let them see the potential of their once-noble profession that has become for too many of its practitioners just another way to make money.They would be watching a fascinating, if flawed, biography of one of the country's most celebrated lawyers, Clarence Darrow. The two-hour production, "Darrow," will be on Maryland Public Television, channels 22 and 67, at 10 o'clock.
NEWS
February 13, 2003
On February 8, 2003, JOHN H.; beloved husband of the late Florence Anderson. He was an employee of The Social Security Administration for 30 years. He is survived by son John S. Anderson; stepson Alan Darrow; step-daughter Iris Darrow; daughter-in-law Julie Darrow and seven grandchildren Jennifer, John Michael, Christopher, Amanda, Amedio, Anthony and Anna. Memorial donations may be made to Talbot Hospice Foundation, 586 Cynwood Drive Easton, MD 21601.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | June 15, 2003
DEAR overpaid CEOs, golden parachutists, CareFirst and Freddie Mac executives, flash-pan Internet millionaires and corporate crooks everywhere: You forgot this, but it is possible to become rich in American business in a way that is honest, honorable and economically benevolent. As evidence I recount the quaint, true fable of Rick Sarmiento, the rusty Toyota and the bichrome apparel palette. Sarmiento and his partners will be worth millions of dollars apiece after the impending public stock offering of The White House Inc., the women's clothing chain they started in the mid-1980s.
NEWS
By Kristen A. Graham and Kristen A. Graham,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 20, 2002
HADDON TOWNSHIP, N.J. -- In the glory days, Stanley Darrow recalled with a wistful sigh, they were as popular as shoe stores. "Back in the '50s and '60s," he said, strapping on a 21-pound, gleaming, black Titano and giving it a squeeze, "every town had an accordion school." Now, Darrow's Acme Accordion School is among the last of its kind. Founded in 1952 and last remodeled in 1960, the low, white building is a throwback to a time when Lawrence Welk and his champagne bubbles were floating at the top of their popularity.
NEWS
By Steven A. Drizin | August 21, 2000
CHICAGO -- Gary Graham's execution last month received intense media coverage. Yet, little attention was paid to his having been only 17 -- a juvenile in the eyes of many states and under international law -- when he was accused of killing Bobby Lambert in a Houston parking lot in 1981. His age alone would have saved his life in every other country in the world except for a few with the poorest human rights records, countries such as Nigeria, Saudi Arabia and Iran. Though he was too young to vote, too young to fight in combat for his country, too young to drink alcohol and barely old enough to get into an R-rated movie, Graham was not too young to be executed by Texas and by 22 other states in this country.
NEWS
By GERALD F. UELMEN | December 20, 1991
Santa Clara, California. - Karl S. Chambers of York, Pennsylvania, was convicted of beating an elderly woman to death with an ax handle because she refused to hand over her wallet. The deputy district attorney told the jury deciding his fate: ''Karl Chambers has taken a life. As the Bible says, 'and the murderer shall be put to death.' '' Defense counsel objected. The trial judge sustained the objection and told the jury to ignore the biblical exhortation.In a 6-1 ruling, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court reversed Chambers' death sentence and said a mistrial should have been declared.
NEWS
August 12, 2007
On August 3, 2007, IRIS I. DARROW; beloved daughter of the late Florance Anderson and the late Albert Darrow as well as the late stepfather of John H. Anderson, died after a short illness with cancer. Iris is also survived by her brother Allan M. Darrow and his wife Julia A., John S. Anderson, stepbrother Jay Orash; stepsister, Laura Chadwick and the late Michael Orash. Iris also has four nieces and four nephews. Iris is a 1965 graduate of Southern High School in Baltimore. Iris was a long time employee of F.M.C.
FEATURES
By Roy Rivenburg and Roy Rivenburg,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 30, 2005
Think of it as Donald Trump Fantasy Camp in a box. For decades, the game of Monopoly has been helping people discover their inner capitalist. It has been played underwater, aboard moving elevators, even by train robbers during a heist. Custom versions of the game have been built from chocolate, gold and granite. Monopoly has also spawned scores of imitators and spoofs, from Bible-opoly to Welfare Monopoly. This spring, to mark the game's 70th birthday, toy maker Hasbro issued an Art Deco edition of Monopoly, along with a compilation of oddball trivia (sample tidbit: The cop on the "Go to Jail" square is named Edgar Mallory)
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2004
Bernadette "Bee" Baldwin Darrow, who owned a Severna Park arts and crafts supplies shop for nearly two decades, died Saturday of complications from Alzheimer's disease at her home in Sunrise Assisted Living in Severna Park. She was 76. Bernadette Baldwin was born in Annapolis and graduated from St. Joseph's High School, a boarding school in Emmitsburg. She attended Dunbarton College in Washington for two years. In 1948, she married Paul Darrow, who was then a graduate student at Georgetown University.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | June 15, 2003
DEAR overpaid CEOs, golden parachutists, CareFirst and Freddie Mac executives, flash-pan Internet millionaires and corporate crooks everywhere: You forgot this, but it is possible to become rich in American business in a way that is honest, honorable and economically benevolent. As evidence I recount the quaint, true fable of Rick Sarmiento, the rusty Toyota and the bichrome apparel palette. Sarmiento and his partners will be worth millions of dollars apiece after the impending public stock offering of The White House Inc., the women's clothing chain they started in the mid-1980s.
NEWS
February 13, 2003
On February 8, 2003, JOHN H.; beloved husband of the late Florence Anderson. He was an employee of The Social Security Administration for 30 years. He is survived by son John S. Anderson; stepson Alan Darrow; step-daughter Iris Darrow; daughter-in-law Julie Darrow and seven grandchildren Jennifer, John Michael, Christopher, Amanda, Amedio, Anthony and Anna. Memorial donations may be made to Talbot Hospice Foundation, 586 Cynwood Drive Easton, MD 21601.
NEWS
By Kristen A. Graham and Kristen A. Graham,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 20, 2002
HADDON TOWNSHIP, N.J. -- In the glory days, Stanley Darrow recalled with a wistful sigh, they were as popular as shoe stores. "Back in the '50s and '60s," he said, strapping on a 21-pound, gleaming, black Titano and giving it a squeeze, "every town had an accordion school." Now, Darrow's Acme Accordion School is among the last of its kind. Founded in 1952 and last remodeled in 1960, the low, white building is a throwback to a time when Lawrence Welk and his champagne bubbles were floating at the top of their popularity.
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | November 21, 1991
ACTOR LAURENCE Luckinbill thinks he has the best of all worlds with his one-man shows."But it is lonesome," he admits. "You look around and there isn't anybody to talk back. The worst part is when the stage manager says 'Place, please.' "Luckinbill's latest solo production is "Clarence Darrow," in which he portrays the late maverick lawyer who is probably best known for his defense of the right of John T. Scopes to teach the theory of evolution to school children.The show is scheduled for one performance only at 8 p.m. Saturday at the Medical School Teaching Facility at the University of Maryland at Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Roy Rivenburg and Roy Rivenburg,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 30, 2005
Think of it as Donald Trump Fantasy Camp in a box. For decades, the game of Monopoly has been helping people discover their inner capitalist. It has been played underwater, aboard moving elevators, even by train robbers during a heist. Custom versions of the game have been built from chocolate, gold and granite. Monopoly has also spawned scores of imitators and spoofs, from Bible-opoly to Welfare Monopoly. This spring, to mark the game's 70th birthday, toy maker Hasbro issued an Art Deco edition of Monopoly, along with a compilation of oddball trivia (sample tidbit: The cop on the "Go to Jail" square is named Edgar Mallory)
NEWS
By Steven A. Drizin | August 21, 2000
CHICAGO -- Gary Graham's execution last month received intense media coverage. Yet, little attention was paid to his having been only 17 -- a juvenile in the eyes of many states and under international law -- when he was accused of killing Bobby Lambert in a Houston parking lot in 1981. His age alone would have saved his life in every other country in the world except for a few with the poorest human rights records, countries such as Nigeria, Saudi Arabia and Iran. Though he was too young to vote, too young to fight in combat for his country, too young to drink alcohol and barely old enough to get into an R-rated movie, Graham was not too young to be executed by Texas and by 22 other states in this country.
FEATURES
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | September 13, 1999
CLEVELAND -- Believe me, it's not easy being a sports fan when you're from Cleveland and living in Baltimore. Albert Belle? Can deal with him, sort of. I root for the O's. But Art Modell? Can't deal with him at all. Couldn't possibly root for the Ravens. Ever.So I arrived here last Wednesday to get my football fix in Cleveland, my boyhood home, a place splashed with orange and brown and foamy beer, where people are preparing for the biggest party in a long, long time.The Cleveland Browns, thank the Lord, are back.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.