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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 14, 1998
Maximillian Cohen is a man on the verge of a nervous breakdown.A mathematician by trade, Max (Sean Gullette) is obsessed by numbers -- their beauty, their logic and their ineluctable hold over our lives and the natural world.Max is also convinced that by using numbers theory -- specifically, by figuring out the mysteries of pi, a number with an infinite amount of integers -- he can crack the stock market. Max's days are spent seeing patterns in otherwise random events, whether he's reducing the leaves of a tree to a series ofelegant theorems or charting recurring symbols on the New York Times financial pages.
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By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2011
Oscar-nominated director Darren Aronofsky often tells interviewers that "The Red Shoes" (1948) is the one film comparable to his own "Black Swan. " How modest of him! Aronofsky was right to say that the classic by British masters Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger "captured the human drama and sacrifice" of the ballet world. He was wrong to consider his film in the same class — downright daffy to think that "The Red Shoes" expresses a "realistic point of view" any more than "Black Swan" does.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | November 22, 2006
Darren Aronofsky labors awfully hard to get across a pretty simple message in The Fountain. But his efforts are so ethereal and extreme, it's almost impossible to turn away. Six years ago, Aronofsky got moviegoers' tongues wagging with Requiem for a Dream, a dirgelike descent into America's obsession with drugs, both legal and illegal, that unfolded like a slow-motion train wreck; the tragedy of the film was as inexorable as it was compelling. Audiences may react to The Fountain in the same way, though for completely different reasons: The emptiness left behind at the end of Requiem is replaced by a sense of joy and awe. The Fountain (Warner Bros.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH | April 21, 2009
Starring Mickey Rourke, Marisa Tomei. Directed by Darren Aronofsky. Released by Fox Searchlight; $29.95, Blu-ray, $39.95. **** (4 STARS) Getting a broken-down actor, savaged by time and broken almost beyond repair by his own miscalculations, to play a broken-down wrestler, savaged by time and broken almost beyond repair by his own miscalculations, was only part of the genius behind The Wrestler. The rest was not letting that be the only reason to recommend the movie. Make no mistake: Getting Mickey Rourke, his body and reputation ravaged by years of physical and emotional self-abuse, to play Randy "The Ram" Robinson, was an incredible gamble (financing was tough to come by, given Rourke's track record)
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | April 21, 2009
Starring Mickey Rourke, Marisa Tomei. Directed by Darren Aronofsky. Released by Fox Searchlight; $29.95, Blu-ray, $39.95. **** (4 STARS) Getting a broken-down actor, savaged by time and broken almost beyond repair by his own miscalculations, to play a broken-down wrestler, savaged by time and broken almost beyond repair by his own miscalculations, was only part of the genius behind The Wrestler. The rest was not letting that be the only reason to recommend the movie. Make no mistake: Getting Mickey Rourke, his body and reputation ravaged by years of physical and emotional self-abuse, to play Randy "The Ram" Robinson, was an incredible gamble (financing was tough to come by, given Rourke's track record)
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 10, 2000
Sara Goldfarb dreams of being on television. Harry Goldfarb dreams of living the dream. Marion Silver dreams of finding and sharing love. What none of them ever dreamed was that they'd become the kind of sad, lonely victims you read about in police logs. Such are the pitfalls of human existence examined in "Requiem for a Dream," a heartbreaking, devastating film from director Darren Aronofsky ("Pi") that takes Hollywood's traditional optimism that things will work out and stands it on its head.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2011
Oscar-nominated director Darren Aronofsky often tells interviewers that "The Red Shoes" (1948) is the one film comparable to his own "Black Swan. " How modest of him! Aronofsky was right to say that the classic by British masters Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger "captured the human drama and sacrifice" of the ballet world. He was wrong to consider his film in the same class — downright daffy to think that "The Red Shoes" expresses a "realistic point of view" any more than "Black Swan" does.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 12, 2001
This year's Independent Spirit Award, feisty cousin to the Oscars, should prove even more off-center than usual. Organizers have hired Baltimore's own John Waters to serve as host. "I feel like Buddy Hackett and Satyajit Ray," Waters said yesterday. (Hackett, of course, is a perennial second banana and Friars Club mainstay, while Ray was a revered Indian filmmaker.) "I gave the keynote speech two years ago, so I guess I impressed them enough to invite me back." The Spirits, held annually in Santa Monica on the day before the Oscars, honor films made outside the Hollywood mainstream, although the definition of "outside the mainstream" has been stretched pretty thin of late; see the list of nominees below.
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By Chris Kaltenbach | April 12, 2001
Films about a housewarming party at which a guest reveals his personal relationship with the abominable snowman, and a hyper-kinetic Hong Kong contract killer start John Hopkins Film Fest 2001 tonight at the Charles. The four-day festival, which moves to the Hopkins campus tomorrow, will include more than 125 feature-length films and shorts, from Darren Aronofsky's "Requiem for a Dream" to works from little-known local filmmakers. It all starts tonight at 8 with Scott Barlow's "The Last Late Night," about a dinner party that takes unforeseen turns, and a pair of shorts: "Seraglio," a tale of adultery and cabbage, and "The Hook-Armed Man," in which Jesus works at a gas station.
NEWS
March 4, 2012
"The Very Hungry Caterpillar. " It either could be a charming children's movie, or the caterpillar could be made into a giant human-eating caterpillar and it could be a bloody, campy horror. Luke Broadwater, reporter, The Baltimore Sun I'm very interested in the cinematic possibilities for "Go the F--- to Sleep. " Especially as directed by Zach Snyder or Darren Aronofsky. Anne Tallent, editor, b "The Berenstain Bears and Too Much Junkfood" is one of my favorite children's books.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | November 22, 2006
Darren Aronofsky labors awfully hard to get across a pretty simple message in The Fountain. But his efforts are so ethereal and extreme, it's almost impossible to turn away. Six years ago, Aronofsky got moviegoers' tongues wagging with Requiem for a Dream, a dirgelike descent into America's obsession with drugs, both legal and illegal, that unfolded like a slow-motion train wreck; the tragedy of the film was as inexorable as it was compelling. Audiences may react to The Fountain in the same way, though for completely different reasons: The emptiness left behind at the end of Requiem is replaced by a sense of joy and awe. The Fountain (Warner Bros.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 12, 2001
This year's Independent Spirit Award, feisty cousin to the Oscars, should prove even more off-center than usual. Organizers have hired Baltimore's own John Waters to serve as host. "I feel like Buddy Hackett and Satyajit Ray," Waters said yesterday. (Hackett, of course, is a perennial second banana and Friars Club mainstay, while Ray was a revered Indian filmmaker.) "I gave the keynote speech two years ago, so I guess I impressed them enough to invite me back." The Spirits, held annually in Santa Monica on the day before the Oscars, honor films made outside the Hollywood mainstream, although the definition of "outside the mainstream" has been stretched pretty thin of late; see the list of nominees below.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 10, 2000
Sara Goldfarb dreams of being on television. Harry Goldfarb dreams of living the dream. Marion Silver dreams of finding and sharing love. What none of them ever dreamed was that they'd become the kind of sad, lonely victims you read about in police logs. Such are the pitfalls of human existence examined in "Requiem for a Dream," a heartbreaking, devastating film from director Darren Aronofsky ("Pi") that takes Hollywood's traditional optimism that things will work out and stands it on its head.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 14, 1998
Maximillian Cohen is a man on the verge of a nervous breakdown.A mathematician by trade, Max (Sean Gullette) is obsessed by numbers -- their beauty, their logic and their ineluctable hold over our lives and the natural world.Max is also convinced that by using numbers theory -- specifically, by figuring out the mysteries of pi, a number with an infinite amount of integers -- he can crack the stock market. Max's days are spent seeing patterns in otherwise random events, whether he's reducing the leaves of a tree to a series ofelegant theorems or charting recurring symbols on the New York Times financial pages.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 4, 2003
Spun wants to be The Lost Weekend of drug movies, but for movie-lovers it will merely mark a frittered-away afternoon or evening. It follows a speed freak named Ross (Jason Schwartzman) through three rancid Southern California days when he provides wheels for a methamphetamine chef known as, naturally, the Cook (Mickey Rourke) - a bad ol' boy who's the most potent figure in a grotty extended group of crank addicts. The gang includes the Cook's girlfriend, Nikki (Brittany Murphy), her gal pal Cookie (Mena Suvari)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cassidy Sterling | April 22, 2014
Bacon, bacon and more bacon. That's the theme at the first-ever Maryland Bacon Festival, held this Saturday at Rash Field (noon-10 p.m.; $25; maylandbaconfestival.com ). Evan Weinstein, partner at Steez Promo and J&E Food Events is behind the event, an idea he's been working on for the past year. "I've been looking to get into food events for a while, I was kicking the idea around with [chef] Patrick Morrow from Ryleigh's Oyster and [marketing director] Chip Watkins who works for Flying Dog. Soon after, the opportunity arose to develop a concept around bacon festivals and I went for it," said Weinstein, 31, of Bay Ridge.
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