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By Leslie Cauley | April 28, 1991
The crown jewel of the University of Maryland's supercomputing center is the "Connection Machine," a sleek, state-of-the-art supercomputer capable of executing close to a billion calculations per second.Researchers from as far away as Tel Aviv, Israel, are using the supercomputer, manufactured by Thinking Machines Corp. of Cambridge, Mass., for molecular modeling, environmental simulation and numerical analysis, to name just a few projects.If the university had bought the Connection Machine, or one like it, on the open market, the two-unit system would have cost about $2.5 million, estimates Larry Davis, director of the university's supercomputing center.
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NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,david.wood@baltsun.com | April 28, 2009
The projects to be launched at a top-secret University of Maryland research center would make "Q" - James Bond's owlish gadget-meister - blink with tears of envy. In the coming months, teams of the nation's top theoretical mathematicians, behavioral scientists, software engineers and futurists will assemble to figure out how to make U.S. intelligence better, faster and more efficient. Aston Martins with twin machine guns and ejector seats? Flamethrower bagpipes? Jet packs? The missile-firing leg cast?
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 22, 1995
LAS VEGAS -- Those searching for insights into what will be driving the post-Cold War economy may have gotten an important, if unexpected, clue last week: Alliance Gaming Corp. announced that it was acquiring Bally Gaming International Inc. for $215 million.Some might regard the combination of two Las Vegas companies that essentially manufacture souped-up slot machines as something less than an economic milestone.But Craig I. Fields, a man who knows a few things about the Cold War, thinks otherwise.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 25, 1999
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- What if you were always logged on to a computer, no matter where you went or what you did?If you needed information or wanted to communicate with someone, all you had to do would be to speak.The computer would always be there, a silent helpmate, part of the fabric of your daily life -- so integrated with your existence it would be like the very air you breathe.Like oxygen.That is the vision behind Oxygen, a $40 million research project unveiled last week at the 35th-anniversary celebration of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Laboratory for Computer Science.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,david.wood@baltsun.com | April 28, 2009
The projects to be launched at a top-secret University of Maryland research center would make "Q" - James Bond's owlish gadget-meister - blink with tears of envy. In the coming months, teams of the nation's top theoretical mathematicians, behavioral scientists, software engineers and futurists will assemble to figure out how to make U.S. intelligence better, faster and more efficient. Aston Martins with twin machine guns and ejector seats? Flamethrower bagpipes? Jet packs? The missile-firing leg cast?
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 25, 1999
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- What if you were always logged on to a computer, no matter where you went or what you did?If you needed information or wanted to communicate with someone, all you had to do would be to speak.The computer would always be there, a silent helpmate, part of the fabric of your daily life -- so integrated with your existence it would be like the very air you breathe.Like oxygen.That is the vision behind Oxygen, a $40 million research project unveiled last week at the 35th-anniversary celebration of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Laboratory for Computer Science.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | April 1, 2006
The Pentagon wants to get one thing straight: It is not building a "bionic" arm like the one test pilot Steve Austin got in The Six Million Dollar Man TV series more than 30 years ago. True, the government is paying the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory $30.4 million to spearhead development of a thought-controlled mechanical arm for the growing number of soldiers who lose their own in battle or accidents. But the new device won't give wearers super powers to carry back into combat.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elise Ackerman and Elise Ackerman,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 15, 2004
SAN JOSE, Calif. - When Randy Gobbel joined SRI International a year ago, one of the coolest things about his new job in the Engineering Building was the little red robots wandering the halls. Wobbling around on three wheels and resembling mutant ladybugs, they would stop at Gobbel's open office door and silently peer inside. "Sometimes you feel like you just want to pet them," said Gobbel, a computer scientist who is working on a biochemical database. But it wasn't a friendly visit. Though they looked like toys, they were working together to build a collective map, sending information back to a central computer.
NEWS
By Daren Briscoe and Daren Briscoe,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 14, 2004
The rise of the machines suffered something of a setback yesterday as a fleet of high-tech, unmanned vehicles demonstrated the ability to plow into fences, snarl themselves in barbed wire and even self-immolate, all unaided by human hands. Played out in the unforgiving sands of the Mojave Desert, the ill-fated spectacle was a competition sponsored by the Pentagon's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, which specializes in cutting-edge, high-risk ventures with the potential for military application.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2003
It's billed as one of the quirkiest, cutting-edge cross-country competitions in history: a pack of souped-up racers galloping through 250 miles of desert between California and Las Vegas for a million in cash. The catch: Computers will be at the controls. The Grand Challenge is part Baja 500, part BattleBots. Since organizers began accepting signups last month, the race has attracted everyone from former NASA engineers to garage monkeys like Chris Pedersen, a former stock car racer who boasts that his team's "strong suit is low tech.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 22, 1995
LAS VEGAS -- Those searching for insights into what will be driving the post-Cold War economy may have gotten an important, if unexpected, clue last week: Alliance Gaming Corp. announced that it was acquiring Bally Gaming International Inc. for $215 million.Some might regard the combination of two Las Vegas companies that essentially manufacture souped-up slot machines as something less than an economic milestone.But Craig I. Fields, a man who knows a few things about the Cold War, thinks otherwise.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley | April 28, 1991
The crown jewel of the University of Maryland's supercomputing center is the "Connection Machine," a sleek, state-of-the-art supercomputer capable of executing close to a billion calculations per second.Researchers from as far away as Tel Aviv, Israel, are using the supercomputer, manufactured by Thinking Machines Corp. of Cambridge, Mass., for molecular modeling, environmental simulation and numerical analysis, to name just a few projects.If the university had bought the Connection Machine, or one like it, on the open market, the two-unit system would have cost about $2.5 million, estimates Larry Davis, director of the university's supercomputing center.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby | November 3, 1990
A local unit of Westinghouse Electric Corp. has become the newest member of a group of heavyweight U.S. defense electronic contractors engaged in a $500 million Pentagon program to develop a new generation of gallium arsenide integrated circuits at an affordable price.Westinghouse's Advanced Technology Division in Linthicum has been added to a team led by TRW Inc. that is not only looking at the development of the new chips but also at improving the manufacturing process to allow for the production of higher performance and reliability.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 30, 2003
WASHINGTON - A Pentagon proposal to start a "futures" market that would have let thousands of investors wager on the likelihood of terrorist attacks or coups in the Middle East was canceled yesterday. Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz told lawmakers - one of whom criticized the proposal as "morbid" - that the so-called Policy Analysis Market was terminated yesterday, three days before it was slated to begin registering investors. "I learned about it first from the newspaper this morning," Wolfowitz said during a hearing before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on Iraq's reconstruction.
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