Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDarman
IN THE NEWS

Darman

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Stephen E. Nordlinger and Stephen E. Nordlinger,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 31, 1992
WASHINGTON -- House Democratic leaders and White House budget Director Richard G. Darman clashed yesterday on some of the basic elements of President Bush's budget package, indicating a long battle over spending and tax policy before the ++ November election.At the outset of a House Budget Committee hearing on the $1.52 trillion Bush budget, Rep. Leon E. Panetta, D-Calif., accused the administration of reviving the "same smoke and mirrors, the kind of budget gimmicks we saw in the 1980s" to try to minimize mammoth deficits.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 20, 1993
The Bush administration cannot be allowed to go off into the wild blue yonder without a glimpse at what it foresees fiscally in the wild blue yonder. It is not a pretty picture either for Bill Clinton's baby boomers or for George Bush's grandchildren.Deep within the budget book issued in these latter days by Richard Darman, chief of the book-cooking department in the Bush White House, are projections of what the federal deficit may look like in the year 2030 and beyond. We would advise all readers daring to go on to fasten their seat belts.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | February 7, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Budget director Richard G. Darman signaled administration willingness yesterday to renegotiate with Congress the 1990 budget agreement that prevents the so-called "peace dividend" from being used to counter the recession, but attached tough conditions to any change in the pact.The agreement caps defense, domestic and international spending, and prohibits the transfer of funding from one to another of the three categories.Democrats in Congress want to tear down the walls between the categories to allow defense savings to be used for an economic growth package this year.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 25, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Budget director Richard G. Darman derided the economic proposals of presidential candidates Bill Clinton and Ross Perot yesterday in an unusual session with reporters, cleared by the Bush-Quayle election campaign.Mr. Darman invited a group of journalists for coffee and cookies in his conference room in the Old Executive Office Building to lower the boom on the two challenges to President Bush's approach to reviving the moribund economy.Somewhat theatrically thumbing a copy of the administration's 2,000-page fiscal 1993 budget -- which was rejected by Congress earlier this year -- he dismissed Mr. Clinton's 22-page economic blueprint as appearing "to have been put together late at night by someone wearing very dark glasses, perhaps while playing a saxophone."
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 17, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Runaway health costs are jeopardizing the nation's long-term economic stability and sinking the federal government into deeper debt, Bush administration budget director Richard G. Darman told Congress yesterday.By 2030, America will be working largely to pay its doctor bills if present trends continue, predicted Mr. Darman, director of the Office of Management and Budget. Health spending will overtake Social Security as the biggest item in the federal budget by the turn of the century, he said.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 28, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Dr. Louis W. Sullivan, the secretary of health and human services, has complained that cuts in his budget request demanded by Richard G. Darman, the White House budget director, would harm services to 50 million Americans who benefit from Social Security, Medicare and other federal health programs.In a confidential letter, Dr. Sullivan also complained that Mr. Darman was interfering too much in the operation and management of the giant Department of Health and Human Services, which accounts for 35 percent of all federal spending.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | July 18, 1991
WASHINGTON -- For all those of us who have goofed in balancing our checkbooks, there was comforting news yesterday from Bush administration Budget Director Richard G. Darman: We are not alone.Mr. Darman told the Senate Budget Committee that $17.8 billion of an unexpectedly large $67 billion increase in the deficit projection for 1992 was due mostly to a newly discovered mistake in the way tax receipts are estimated.The error was made by Treasury Department tax estimators, who applied the wrong tax rate to projections for a category of income, Mr. Darman said.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | April 9, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Responding to growing public disgust over government freebies, the Bush administration has ordered its own perks purge to identify areas that make the president and his people look as though they're wasting taxpayers' money.Despite the order to scour for perks, Budget Director Richard Darman drew the line yesterday at requiring President Bush to give up Air Force One, saying Americans believe that "the dignity of office" should permit George Bush to travel on the Boeing 747 luxury aircraft.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 25, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Budget director Richard G. Darman derided the economic proposals of presidential candidates Bill Clinton and Ross Perot yesterday in an unusual session with reporters, cleared by the Bush-Quayle election campaign.Mr. Darman invited a group of journalists for coffee and cookies in his conference room in the Old Executive Office Building to lower the boom on the two challenges to President Bush's approach to reviving the moribund economy.Somewhat theatrically thumbing a copy of the administration's 2,000-page fiscal 1993 budget -- which was rejected by Congress earlier this year -- he dismissed Mr. Clinton's 22-page economic blueprint as appearing "to have been put together late at night by someone wearing very dark glasses, perhaps while playing a saxophone."
NEWS
January 20, 1993
The Bush administration cannot be allowed to go off into the wild blue yonder without a glimpse at what it foresees fiscally in the wild blue yonder. It is not a pretty picture either for Bill Clinton's baby boomers or for George Bush's grandchildren.Deep within the budget book issued in these latter days by Richard Darman, chief of the book-cooking department in the Bush White House, are projections of what the federal deficit may look like in the year 2030 and beyond. We would advise all readers daring to go on to fasten their seat belts.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | May 7, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Amid growing signs that a balanced-budget constitutional amendment could be approved this year, the Bush administration's budget director challenged the Democratic-controlled Congress yesterday to eliminate the $400 billion federal budget deficit by capping spending on mandatory federal programs.Richard G. Darman, director of the Office of Management and Budget, said that such a cap, coupled with a strong economic growth program, could eliminate the deficit and create a surplus as early as 1997.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | April 9, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Responding to growing public disgust over government freebies, the Bush administration has ordered its own perks purge to identify areas that make the president and his people look as though they're wasting taxpayers' money.Despite the order to scour for perks, Budget Director Richard Darman drew the line yesterday at requiring President Bush to give up Air Force One, saying Americans believe that "the dignity of office" should permit George Bush to travel on the Boeing 747 luxury aircraft.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | February 7, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Budget director Richard G. Darman signaled administration willingness yesterday to renegotiate with Congress the 1990 budget agreement that prevents the so-called "peace dividend" from being used to counter the recession, but attached tough conditions to any change in the pact.The agreement caps defense, domestic and international spending, and prohibits the transfer of funding from one to another of the three categories.Democrats in Congress want to tear down the walls between the categories to allow defense savings to be used for an economic growth package this year.
NEWS
By Stephen E. Nordlinger and Stephen E. Nordlinger,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 31, 1992
WASHINGTON -- House Democratic leaders and White House budget Director Richard G. Darman clashed yesterday on some of the basic elements of President Bush's budget package, indicating a long battle over spending and tax policy before the ++ November election.At the outset of a House Budget Committee hearing on the $1.52 trillion Bush budget, Rep. Leon E. Panetta, D-Calif., accused the administration of reviving the "same smoke and mirrors, the kind of budget gimmicks we saw in the 1980s" to try to minimize mammoth deficits.
NEWS
By Dick Armey | November 29, 1991
PRESIDENT BUSH is dangerously out of touch with the American public.Instead of listening to the elected people in his party most in touch with the average voter -- House Republicans -- he remains cloistered with aides who avoid action and favor blaming others for the nation's economic, and their boss' consequent political, woes.House Republicans are increasingly frustrated with the White House's wait-and-see attitude on the economy. We hear our constituents' genuine concern abut their prosperity and sense resentment that the administration seems to show little regard for that concern.
NEWS
By Edward L. Hudgins & Robert E. Moffit | November 19, 1991
MANY members of Congress finally seem willing to recognize something well understood by millions of unemployed workers and bankrupt business owners: The U.S. economy is stagnant, with no strong upturn in sight.Two million more Americans are out of work today than 18 months ago. Businesses are still shutting down and consumers are still staying away from the stores.Many lawmakers now understand that a package of tax and budget cuts is needed to lower the barriers to economic activity and growth.
NEWS
February 5, 1991
President Bush's $1.446 trillion budget for the fiscal year starting next October comes close to confessing that the federal government is plunging into debt at the rate of $1 billion a day. His precise figure is a record $318 billion, but this assumes a "shorter and shallower recession" than usual and provides a "place card" of $15 billion for a gulf war whose costs admittedly will go much higher.Yet if confession is good even for the soul of U.S. budget director Richard G. Darman, the latest seven-pound, 2,029-page federal compendium of the fiscal future has its merits.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | July 18, 1991
WASHINGTON -- For all those of us who have goofed in balancing our checkbooks, there was comforting news yesterday from Bush administration Budget Director Richard G. Darman: We are not alone.Mr. Darman told the Senate Budget Committee that $17.8 billion of an unexpectedly large $67 billion increase in the deficit projection for 1992 was due mostly to a newly discovered mistake in the way tax receipts are estimated.The error was made by Treasury Department tax estimators, who applied the wrong tax rate to projections for a category of income, Mr. Darman said.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.