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Dark Matter

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By New York Times News Service | September 21, 1993
Two scientific teams reported yesterday that they had independently observed what could be the first evidence that some of the invisible, or dark, matter making up much of the mass of the universe exists in the form of stillborn or extremely dim stars at the edges of galaxies.Such objects, known as Massive Compact Halo Objects, or MACHOs, have been hypothesized for years as likely candidates for dark matter. The acronym was chosen to contrast with theories invoking exotic subatomic particles, as yet undiscovered, bearing the name WIMPs, for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2012
Breakthrough: Scientists at Europe's CERN research center found evidence of a new subatomic particle thought to be the Higgs boson, known popularly as the "God particle. " Researchers: Thousands of scientists around the world collaborated; locally, researchers from the University of Maryland College Park and Johns Hopkins University were involved. Description: Scientists observed trillions of collisions of protons, with what Hopkins assistant professor Andrei Gritsan called the equivalent of 16,000 digital cameras watching and recording.
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NEWS
January 8, 1993
Scientists have long suspected that there is more to the universe than meets the eye. Now astronomers have found the most convincing evidence yet that large amounts of previously undiscovered matter are floating around the cosmos -- even though they still can't see it.The evidence comes from the X-ray part of the spectrum studied by a satellite which found a huge cloud of hot gas with more mass than 500 billion suns amid a trio of obscure galaxies known...
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Reporter | December 2, 2007
It might seem as if astronomers and astrophysicists have had enormous success at unlocking the mysteries of space. Impressive evidence has been gathered to support the theory that our universe was created about 13.7 billion years ago with an explosion of energy that eventually formed the innumerable galaxies still spinning away from one another to uncharted expanses of space. We've discovered distant planets that might be friendly to life as we know it and have estimated distances to remote pulsing stars to help map the universe.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 16, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The keen eyes of the Hubble Space Telescope are shattering scientists' pet theories about two TC fundamental questions about the universe:What is it made of? And how old is it?Astronomers said yesterday that new photographs from Hubble rule out the widely held belief that dim red stars five to 10 times smaller than the sun make up most of the invisible matter in the universe.Only about 10 percent of the mass of the universe is visible. The rest is so-called "dark matter" -- a mysterious substance that has baffled scientists since it was discovered 60 years ago."
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 19, 1995
PHILADELPHIA -- A team of astronomers claimed yesterday the first definitive detection of objects making up the elusive "dark matter," long believed to lurk between the stars.The speculative dark matter is, by definition, invisible. Therefore, the astronomers from Livermore (Calif.) National Laboratory, along with collaborators from Britain and Australia, used an indirect technique: looking for distorting effects that dark matter would have on the light coming to earth from more distant stars.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | November 9, 2004
Say you're an up-and-coming contemporary art enthusiast and you're trying to spot the Next Big Thing. What to do? Well, you could bone up on your connoisseurship - sharpen an expert eye for line, color, etc. But maybe you've done that; the next best thing might be to look for "dark matter." Artistic "dark matter," like the celestial kind astronomers search for through their telescopes, is that 90 percent of the whole enchilada we can't see, even though we know it's got to be there. It's what Baltimore Museum of Art contemporary art curator Chris Gilbert calls the welter of images, objects, performances, happenings and collective projects by mostly younger artist-activists that lie just under the radar screens of mainstream institutions like art museums and galleries.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN REPORTER | May 16, 2007
"Dark matter" is probably the most abundant stuff in the universe, making up more than 90 percent of everything out there. And yet scientists know almost nothing about it. They can't see it because it doesn't shine or reflect light. But astronomers in Baltimore said yesterday that they have used the Hubble Space Telescope to map the dark matter billowing out from the long-ago collision of two galaxy clusters. They're calling it the strongest evidence yet of the existence of dark matter, and the first observation to separate it from its associated stars, galaxies and glowing gas. "What we found is a very peculiar structure - a ring-like structure that surrounds the core of the cluster," said Johns Hopkins University research scientist M. James Jee, lead author on the study that will appear in the June 1 issue of The Astrophysical Journal.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | January 28, 1993
They parlayed curiosity about an oddly shaped galaxy into fresh evidence that up to 96 percent of the universe is made of a mysterious, invisible material called dark matter. And their findings support a leading theory about the birth, and ultimate fate, of the universe.Not bad for a couple of College Park students still working on their Ph.Ds.David S. Davis, 34, and John S. Mulchaey, 25, didn't expect to find anything more than a small gas cloud floating about 150 million light years from Earth: an interesting, though certainly not world-shaking, discovery.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 21, 1993
Sudden, stunning flashes of brilliance by three nearby stars have led scientists to conclude they have seen the first direct evidence of one form of dark matter, the mysterious and until now unseen phenomenon that is believed to account for 90 percent or more of all mass in the universe.Two teams of scientists, one American and Australian and the other French, reported yesterday at conferences in Italy that three stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud briefly grew brighter than usual, almost certainly because gravity from dark matter bent the star's light rays into focus on Earth.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN REPORTER | May 16, 2007
"Dark matter" is probably the most abundant stuff in the universe, making up more than 90 percent of everything out there. And yet scientists know almost nothing about it. They can't see it because it doesn't shine or reflect light. But astronomers in Baltimore said yesterday that they have used the Hubble Space Telescope to map the dark matter billowing out from the long-ago collision of two galaxy clusters. They're calling it the strongest evidence yet of the existence of dark matter, and the first observation to separate it from its associated stars, galaxies and glowing gas. "What we found is a very peculiar structure - a ring-like structure that surrounds the core of the cluster," said Johns Hopkins University research scientist M. James Jee, lead author on the study that will appear in the June 1 issue of The Astrophysical Journal.
NEWS
By Ben A. Shaberman | December 26, 2006
At a recent National Association of Science Writers Conference in Baltimore, the "Lunch with a Scientist" session offered a menu of informal talks on a wide range of topics. Though my employer pays me to know and write about the retina - the thin piece of vision-critical tissue in the back of the eye - I decided to be a little derelict in my duties and learn about something completely new and unrelated. I considered sitting at the table where "Breaking Up is Hard to Do: Lessons from an Amoeba" was being presented, but I figured that might lead to flashbacks of former girlfriends and images of pond scum - two topics that don't exactly arouse my appetite.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | March 17, 2006
Scientists examining the oldest light in the universe say they've found clear evidence that matter expanded at an almost inconceivable rate after the big bang, creating conditions that led to the formation of the first stars. Light from the big bang's afterglow shows that the universe grew from the size of a marble to an astronomical size in just a trillionth of a second after its birth 13.7 billion years ago, researchers from Johns Hopkins and Princeton universities say. Readings from a NASA probe also show that the earliest stars formed about 400 million years after the big bang - not 200 million years afterward, as the research team once thought.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | November 9, 2004
Say you're an up-and-coming contemporary art enthusiast and you're trying to spot the Next Big Thing. What to do? Well, you could bone up on your connoisseurship - sharpen an expert eye for line, color, etc. But maybe you've done that; the next best thing might be to look for "dark matter." Artistic "dark matter," like the celestial kind astronomers search for through their telescopes, is that 90 percent of the whole enchilada we can't see, even though we know it's got to be there. It's what Baltimore Museum of Art contemporary art curator Chris Gilbert calls the welter of images, objects, performances, happenings and collective projects by mostly younger artist-activists that lie just under the radar screens of mainstream institutions like art museums and galleries.
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2003
Cape Mold-Zern will face a panel of Boys' Latin School faculty members today when he defends his thesis on dark matter in the universe. If he is successful, he will be the only member of his graduating class of 61 to be awarded an honors diploma with distinction from the all-boys school in North Baltimore. When he decided to do the yearlong senior thesis project, Mold-Zern, a 19-year-old Towson resident, was more interested in creating his own course of study. "I took on the project as a challenge so I could study what I wanted," he said.
NEWS
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | April 29, 1997
Astronomers may have found some of the matter that has been missing from the universe, new research suggests.Scientists have long puzzled over why the amount of matter they can see -- in the form of luminous stars, galaxies and so forth -- doesn't seem to be enough to account for the huge gravitational attraction that keeps those galaxies from flying apart.Thus researchers believe that as much as 90 percent of the universe may be made of "dark matter" that nobody can see.The big mystery has been, what would dark matter be made of?
NEWS
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | April 29, 1997
Astronomers may have found some of the matter that has been missing from the universe, new research suggests.Scientists have long puzzled over why the amount of matter they can see -- in the form of luminous stars, galaxies and so forth -- doesn't seem to be enough to account for the huge gravitational attraction that keeps those galaxies from flying apart.Thus researchers believe that as much as 90 percent of the universe may be made of "dark matter" that nobody can see.The big mystery has been, what would dark matter be made of?
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2003
Cape Mold-Zern will face a panel of Boys' Latin School faculty members today when he defends his thesis on dark matter in the universe. If he is successful, he will be the only member of his graduating class of 61 to be awarded an honors diploma with distinction from the all-boys school in North Baltimore. When he decided to do the yearlong senior thesis project, Mold-Zern, a 19-year-old Towson resident, was more interested in creating his own course of study. "I took on the project as a challenge so I could study what I wanted," he said.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 19, 1995
PHILADELPHIA -- A team of astronomers claimed yesterday the first definitive detection of objects making up the elusive "dark matter," long believed to lurk between the stars.The speculative dark matter is, by definition, invisible. Therefore, the astronomers from Livermore (Calif.) National Laboratory, along with collaborators from Britain and Australia, used an indirect technique: looking for distorting effects that dark matter would have on the light coming to earth from more distant stars.
NEWS
By HAL PIPER | November 19, 1994
Only a few years ago Stephen Hawking, the famous British physicist, was confident enough about his theories to remark that the next couple of discoveries would unveil ''the face of God.'' He meant that the secrets of the universe's origin and nature would be completely revealed.Well, back to the blackboard, Dr. Hawking.Recent findings from the Hubble space telescope have thrown cosmology into crisis: 90 percent of the universe isn't there. And some of the stars are twice as old as the universe of which they are a part.
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