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By Victor Davis Hanson | October 27, 2006
The most frightening aspect of the present war is how easily our pre-modern enemies from the Middle East have brought a stunned, postmodern world back into the Dark Ages. Students of history are sickened when they read of the long-ago, gruesome practice of beheading. How brutal were those societies that chopped off the heads of Cicero, Sir Thomas More and Marie Antoinette. And how lucky we thought we were to have evolved from such elemental barbarity. Twenty-four hundred years ago, Socrates was executed for unpopular speech.
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NEWS
September 11, 2014
Regarding Becky Robinson's commentary on animal cruelty, Anne Arundel County should come out of the Dark Ages and into the compassionate era where all creatures are treated with respect ( "Anne Arundel's cruel cat policy," Sept. 4). Trap, neuter and release is the modern way. We in Canada employ this technique and it is working great. James Cosgrave - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Power | February 5, 1996
LONDON -- Which African country is growing faster than an Asian tiger and has a low inflation rate to boot? Uganda. I didn't get it right first guess either.After the perverse brutality of Idi Amin, war with Tanzania, the amoral megalomania of Milton Obote and then the revelation that the country was the world's epicenter of AIDS, who would have supposed such triumph could emerge? This was a country so looted and disarranged that it returned to the Dark Ages. But, apparently, there is life after death; Uganda proves it.If Uganda can achieve economic growth of 10 percent last year with inflation of only 3.4 percent, then why not the rest of black Africa?
NEWS
June 18, 2012
I have to vehemently differ with letter writer Theresa M. Becker who was greatly offended that the Roman Catholic Church ordained three former Episcopalian priests ("Ordaining married Episcopal priests as Catholics is a sacrilege," June 15). Closed-minded opinions like that keep the Roman Catholic church firmly ensconced in the Dark Ages. The Roman Catholic church is in desperate need of priests; this move is not unprecedented. If Ms. Becker did her homework, she would find that married ministers and priests from other denominations have been ordained and are recognized by the Vatican as being legitimate priests.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen | January 19, 1992
Close your eyes and try to picture the Dark Ages. See nothing? Probably.Few people are aware of the visual legacy of the Dark Ages -- roughly a period from the 4th to the 8th centuries A.D., ending before the Middle Ages began.Thanks to a new exhibition at Ariadne Galleries in New York City and its catalog, both titled "Treasures of the Dark Ages in Europe," we now can see that the barbarian tribes who spread across Europe wore gleaming jewelry inlaid with precious stones, and their horses wore fancy trappings.
NEWS
September 11, 2014
Regarding Becky Robinson's commentary on animal cruelty, Anne Arundel County should come out of the Dark Ages and into the compassionate era where all creatures are treated with respect ( "Anne Arundel's cruel cat policy," Sept. 4). Trap, neuter and release is the modern way. We in Canada employ this technique and it is working great. James Cosgrave - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
June 18, 2012
I have to vehemently differ with letter writer Theresa M. Becker who was greatly offended that the Roman Catholic Church ordained three former Episcopalian priests ("Ordaining married Episcopal priests as Catholics is a sacrilege," June 15). Closed-minded opinions like that keep the Roman Catholic church firmly ensconced in the Dark Ages. The Roman Catholic church is in desperate need of priests; this move is not unprecedented. If Ms. Becker did her homework, she would find that married ministers and priests from other denominations have been ordained and are recognized by the Vatican as being legitimate priests.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | January 7, 1999
A. C. Raines knows what it's like to return to the Naval Academy after winter break.Raines, a 1986 graduate, recalls dragging himself back to Annapolis each of his four Januaries to face a dark stretch of academic drudgery, when the wind kicks off the Severn River and slips through every opening in a midshipman's dark wool uniform.Winter is known here as the "Dark Ages."As head of the academy's cafeteria, Lieutenant Commander Raines thought he could help. His idea: Improve each Mid's morale through his or her stomach.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Staff | July 22, 2007
Justinian's Flea Plague, Empire and the Birth of Europe By William Rosen Viking Adult / 384 pages / $27.95 Don't charge William Rosen with lack of ambition. Instead of biography or the thin slice of the past that has become popular with history publishers, he presents us with no less than the foundations of the modern world, as built by a man and an insect. The result is largely successful and engaging. While the reader occasionally loses his bearings in an account that spans 10,000 miles, a dozen peoples, biology, architecture and the law, he is also amazed that Rosen packs it all into only 384 pages.
NEWS
April 25, 2012
Roger Clemens is a selfish, self-serving liar ("'Trapped' in a pack of lies," April 24). How can it be justified that, in the latter years his career, he suddenly had an incredible amount of success? Blind luck? A relentless training regimen, perhaps? Or maybe it was it the vitamin B12, as Clemens stated his injections contained. Who in their proper mind would inject vitamins? This is simply a sad case of a man who is desperately trying to cling to his fading hopes of being inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.
NEWS
April 25, 2012
Roger Clemens is a selfish, self-serving liar ("'Trapped' in a pack of lies," April 24). How can it be justified that, in the latter years his career, he suddenly had an incredible amount of success? Blind luck? A relentless training regimen, perhaps? Or maybe it was it the vitamin B12, as Clemens stated his injections contained. Who in their proper mind would inject vitamins? This is simply a sad case of a man who is desperately trying to cling to his fading hopes of being inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | October 10, 2011
Iconic Oakland Raiders owner Al Davis, he of the slicked hair, dark sunglasses and white jumpsuit, passed away on Saturday. He was memorialized by countless national football writers over the weekend, reminding fans like me who are under 30 years old that Davis was more than just the guy who had an annual ritual of selecting the fastest player on the board -- or the huskiest kicker in the case of Sebastian Janikowski -- in the first round of the...
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Staff | July 22, 2007
Justinian's Flea Plague, Empire and the Birth of Europe By William Rosen Viking Adult / 384 pages / $27.95 Don't charge William Rosen with lack of ambition. Instead of biography or the thin slice of the past that has become popular with history publishers, he presents us with no less than the foundations of the modern world, as built by a man and an insect. The result is largely successful and engaging. While the reader occasionally loses his bearings in an account that spans 10,000 miles, a dozen peoples, biology, architecture and the law, he is also amazed that Rosen packs it all into only 384 pages.
NEWS
By Victor Davis Hanson | October 27, 2006
The most frightening aspect of the present war is how easily our pre-modern enemies from the Middle East have brought a stunned, postmodern world back into the Dark Ages. Students of history are sickened when they read of the long-ago, gruesome practice of beheading. How brutal were those societies that chopped off the heads of Cicero, Sir Thomas More and Marie Antoinette. And how lucky we thought we were to have evolved from such elemental barbarity. Twenty-four hundred years ago, Socrates was executed for unpopular speech.
NEWS
By Andrew Ciofalo | November 24, 2004
I HAVE LIVED all my years in states that are now called "blue" by the guardians of the democratic process. The first candidate I ever voted for was Dwight D. Eisenhower, and the only Democrat was John F. Kennedy. Lately, I have passed up recent elections because the deep blueness of my state guarantees that all electoral votes will go to the Democrats, as will almost all local offices. It seems the only way to effectively participate in the democratic process is to move to one of those battleground states.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 5, 2004
When director-choreographer Bobbi Smith's Talent Machine theater troupe began clicking on all cylinders a decade or so ago, her shows were notable for their energy, overall pizazz and depth of talent. "Catch the energy" was Smith's mantra, and her young charges bought into it wholeheartedly. Intensity never flagged, with youngsters in the third row downstage right smiling and selling their steps as determinedly as the featured kids hoofing front row and center. For sheer glamour, no one in these parts could top a vintage Smith show.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | October 10, 2011
Iconic Oakland Raiders owner Al Davis, he of the slicked hair, dark sunglasses and white jumpsuit, passed away on Saturday. He was memorialized by countless national football writers over the weekend, reminding fans like me who are under 30 years old that Davis was more than just the guy who had an annual ritual of selecting the fastest player on the board -- or the huskiest kicker in the case of Sebastian Janikowski -- in the first round of the...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ray Holton and Ray Holton,Special to the Sun | March 14, 2004
Occidentalism: The West in the Eyes of Its Enemies, by Ian Buruma and Avishai Margalit. Penguin Press. 155 pages. $21.95 This is a small book about big ideas. Actually, it's about Big Bias, as two academicians examine the roots of the anti-Western views of radical Islamists in today's context of 9 / 11 and suicide bombings. And the authors contend that the sources of those views are Western philosophers, kings and dictators, as well as the evolution of capitalism, industrialism and trade.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ray Holton and Ray Holton,Special to the Sun | March 14, 2004
Occidentalism: The West in the Eyes of Its Enemies, by Ian Buruma and Avishai Margalit. Penguin Press. 155 pages. $21.95 This is a small book about big ideas. Actually, it's about Big Bias, as two academicians examine the roots of the anti-Western views of radical Islamists in today's context of 9 / 11 and suicide bombings. And the authors contend that the sources of those views are Western philosophers, kings and dictators, as well as the evolution of capitalism, industrialism and trade.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2003
These galaxies are not only long ago and far away. They're also the earliest and most distant ever photographed. And there are thousands of them. They're the galaxies of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field - the first fruits of a continuing project at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore. Eventually, astronomers expect to capture the glow of tens of thousands of them. And the systems are all waiting in what looks like an "empty" spot of sky just one-tenth of the diameter of the moon.
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