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By Trudy Rubin | September 22, 2006
PHILADELPHIA -- As world leaders gathered at the United Nations this week for the opening of the 61st General Assembly, the shadow of Darfur hung over them all. On Tuesday, from the U.N. podium, President Bush again labeled the slaughter of hundreds of thousands of civilians in Darfur as genocide. Yet the killing, conducted by Sudanese government forces and militias, is intensifying. Sudan is blocking a proposed U.N. peacekeeping force of 20,000, which would have strengthened an unarmed observer force from the African Union.
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By Allison Brickell and For The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2013
When Sokoja Kondorka reflects on the violence and death he saw in his home of Darfur, Sudan, he struggles to articulate it. "You never think that a hundred people are all dead in front of your eyes," he said. "If that's your village and people have been kidnapped from your village … you cannot describe that to any person. " Today, Kondorka lives in Northeast Baltimore, the city he resettled to 10 months ago after years in a refugee camp and a long journey through Chad, Libya and Egypt.
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NEWS
March 27, 2005
FRANCE, long the home of wily diplomats, has come up with a face-saving way for the United States to make good on its intentions to end the ethnic genocide of tribal villagers in war-torn Darfur. Under a French proposal, the United States could allow the International Criminal Court to prosecute those responsible for war crimes in the western region of Sudan without setting a precedent that might someday be used against Americans. In return, the United States could press for Russian and Chinese support of a "no-fly" zone to prevent aerial attacks against Darfur and for stiff sanctions against the Islamist government of Sudan, which encouraged the assault by Janjaweed militiamen.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2012
Someday, members of this year's seventh-grade class at Wilde Lake Middle School might be at the forefront of efforts to eradicate such social ills as genocide, animal cruelty, homelessness and deforestation. The students are learning about social problems both at home and abroad, and on Wednesday night, they presented speeches about causes that have piqued their interest as part of Voices of Youth, a charity fundraiser. The event comes on the heels of the students learning about the conflict in the Sudanese region of Darfur.
NEWS
February 23, 2006
Diplomacy advances sooooo sloooowly at times, even when the lives and security of millions are at stake, that President Bush's call last week for more international muscle to help stop the carnage in Darfur sounded downright urgent by contrast. At the end of a lengthy question-and-answer session Friday with supporters in Florida, Mr. Bush revealed that he is working to assemble an international force under the "stewardship" of NATO that could double the ranks of African Union peacekeepers overwhelmed by the raging civil strife and ethnic violence in western Sudan.
NEWS
By EVAN R. GOLDSTEIN AND HASDAI WESTBROOK | June 14, 2006
"Do I hope there will be a significant decline in violence? Yes. Can I be certain? No." That was Deputy Secretary of State Robert B. Zoellick's pessimistic assessment of the peace agreement he helped broker last month between the Sudanese government and the ragtag rebel groups whose uprising has provided the pretext for the three-year-old genocide in Darfur. Negotiated under intense U.S. and international pressure, the agreement was hailed by President Bush as "the beginnings of hope for the people of Darfur."
NEWS
January 26, 2006
The African Union recently acknowledged what has long been obvious: It has neither the resources nor the mandate to stop the genocide in Darfur. This is actually good news. It frees the United Nations to take over, buttressing AU forces with troops of its own as well as providing much needed equipment and logistical support. This larger force would also have the authority to pre-empt the violence and bloodshed, which has so far resulted in the deaths of 400,000 innocents in western Sudan and displaced two million more.
NEWS
By ROBYN DIXON and ROBYN DIXON,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 5, 2006
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Amid intense pressure to halt the three-year conflict in Darfur, Sudanese government negotiators and Darfur rebels continued last-ditch negotiations early today in a bid to reach an accord after a midnight deadline to end peace talks passed. African Union officials mediating the talks in Nigeria's capital, Abuja, had said earlier that if the talks failed there would be no major extension to the deadline, already pushed back twice. Hopes rose for a deal yesterday after rebel negotiators said the most recent draft agreement had met key concerns, including a demand for thousands of rebel fighters to be integrated into Sudan's security and police forces.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 26, 2007
PARIS -- They came, they met, they agreed that more must be done, but a gathering here aimed at solving the crisis in Sudan's Darfur region ended yesterday with little visible progress. "We really must redouble our efforts, and I think that that was the spirit of today's conference," Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice said at a brief news conference after the day of closed meetings. "The point here was to take stock of where we are and to make sure that we are doing everything we can."
NEWS
By Jonathan Kolieb | December 16, 2007
The ongoing crisis in Darfur is no genocide. In an age of 24-hour news channels, short attention spans and a long list of world crises, "genocide" remains headline-grabbing. But the term's application to Darfur is flawed in legal terms and unhelpful in resolving the crisis, and ultimately undermines worldwide efforts to prevent genocide. Genocide is one of the most disturbingly evocative terms in our vocabulary, and the gravest crime humanity knows. The 1948 Genocide Convention states that two criminal elements - physical and mental - must be proved: There must be actions aimed at or resulting in the deaths of members of a national, religious or ethnic group, and perpetrators of such acts must also have the intent to destroy, in whole or in part, the targeted group.
NEWS
By Rebecca Hamilton, Special to The Washington Post | March 26, 2011
The Sudanese government is preventing aid organizations from delivering food and health services to hundreds of thousands of people in the conflict-ridden Darfur region of the country, according to Baltimore-based Catholic Relief Services, one of the largest remaining groups there. The crackdown has left displaced populations at risk of disease and malnutrition as the government increases military operations in the area. Catholic Relief Services was forced to suspend its work in West Darfur state after the government told it to leave Jan. 20, the organization's country director, Darren Hercyk, said in an interview.
NEWS
By Raj Purohit and Howard Salter | February 6, 2009
In the coming days, President Barack Obama will be presented with an opportunity to tackle a foreign policy challenge frequently raised on the campaign trail: the human rights crisis in Darfur. Since 2003, the Sudanese government and its militia allies have killed and displaced hundreds of thousands of Darfur's civilians. The government has also obstructed international efforts to stop the killing. As a consequence, the U.N. Security Council authorized the International Criminal Court to address this matter.
NEWS
By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | October 20, 2008
Pakistani troops kill 30 militants near border ISLAMABAD, Pakistan : Pakistani forces killed at least 30 militants near the Afghan border, as the region's provincial chief called for "peaceful dialogue" in a meeting with U.S. Assistant Secretary of State Richard Boucher. North West Frontier Province Chief Minister Amir Haider Khan Hoti said he told Boucher during the meeting in Peshawar that he wanted to "to resolve all political problems through peaceful dialogue, but there wouldn't be any compromise on maintaining the writ of the government."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 24, 2008
ABU SUROUJ, Sudan -- As Darfur smolders in the aftermath of a new government offensive, a long-sought peacekeeping force, expected to be the world's largest, is in danger of failing even before it begins its mission because of bureaucratic delays, stonewalling by Sudan's government and reluctance from troop-contributing countries to send peacekeeping forces into an active conflict. The force, which officially took over from an overstretched and exhausted African Union force in Darfur on Jan. 1, has just more than 9,000 of an expected 26,000 soldiers and police officers, and will not fully deploy until the end of the year, U.N. officials said.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 8, 2008
BEIJING -- China has expressed "grave concerns" to the Sudanese government about the recent violence in western Darfur and is actively working to resolve delays in establishing an international peacekeeping force, China's special envoy to Darfur said yesterday. The envoy, Liu Guijin, who recently returned from his fourth visit to Sudan, offered a detailed defense of China's role in Darfur at a news conference at the Foreign Ministry here and repeated Beijing's stance that activists are wrong to link the strife in Darfur to the Beijing Olympics in August.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service. | February 6, 2008
N'DJAMENA, Chad -- A rebellion aimed at toppling Chad's president appeared to falter yesterday as France declared that it would intervene to protect the Chadian government if called upon, and a Darfur rebel group with close ties to the Chadian government said it had sent troops to help bolster the president, Idriss Deby. French military officials in Chad said the rebels were far from N'Djamena, the capital, and the streets of the city were quiet. For the first time since the weekend, the sound of automatic gunfire disappeared.
NEWS
November 24, 2006
At this time when Americans traditionally give thanks for the freedoms and relative abundance of their lives, it's worth also pausing to consider those most wretchedly at the other end of the spectrum. Sadly, there is some competition for that dubious distinction. But surely most any list of the world's most forsaken people would likely be topped by the hapless innocents of Darfur - tribal villagers beaten, raped, murdered and burned out of their homes in a nearly four-year ethnic conflict the Sudanese government won't allow to end, apparently until all are dead.
NEWS
By Maggie Farley and Maggie Farley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 1, 2007
UNITED NATIONS -- The Security Council authorized yesterday an extensive United Nations peacekeeping operation in Darfur aimed at protecting civilians and aid workers in the violence-racked region of Sudan. The council voted 15-0 to begin sending a joint U.N.-African Union force of up to 26,000 troops and police to Darfur before the end of the year to quell the violence that has killed more than 200,000 people and displaced more than 2 million in the past four years. It will take a year to muster the full force, and the cost will be about $2 billion, said peacekeeping chief Jean-Marie Guehenno, who added that a substantial number of troops will arrive in Darfur before year's end. Secretary-General Ban Ki Moon called the resolution "historic and unprecedented," and said it would help "improve the lives of the people of the region and close this tragic chapter in Sudan's history."
NEWS
By James Gerstenzang and James Gerstenzang,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 1, 2008
Crawford, Texas -- President Bush signed legislation yesterday intended to restrict U.S. investment in Sudan, despite his administration's concern that it improperly gives state and local governments a hand in foreign policy. The House and Senate, ignoring the administration's objections, approved the bill unanimously, and Bush signed it at his home near here while reserving the right to enforce it "in a manner that does not conflict" with the federal government's authority to conduct the nation's dealings with other countries.
NEWS
December 24, 2007
Darfur killings meet tests for genocide Jonathan Kolieb's insistence that "Darfur horrors aren't `genocide'" (Opinion*Commentary, Dec. 16) rests on a misunderstanding of the difference between intent and motive. He is right to insist that the 1948 Genocide Convention states that the mental element of the crime must be proved. This mental element, as defined in Article 30 of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court, is comprised of intent and knowledge. According to the statute, "A person has intent where: a)
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