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NEWS
August 25, 1998
MOST OF THE harm in the exchange of explosives between terrorists and the United States was to neither of the above. It was, to use the euphemism of the military, collateral damage. Unintended victims. The innocent.This was notably true of the terrorist attacks on U.S. embassies in Nairobi, Kenya, and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Although 12 U.S. citizens were murdered in the Nairobi attack, so were 247 Kenyans.More than 5,000 people were treated in Kenya's under-equipped hospitals and 542 hospitalized.
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NEWS
By SCOTT CALVERT and SCOTT CALVERT,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | March 26, 2006
NAIROBI, Kenya -- The last thing Richard Wamarite saw with two eyes was a truck moving Aug. 7, 1998, toward the American Embassy here in the Kenyan capital. Then an explosion rocked the intersection where the bus he was riding happened to be, and dusk fell over his world. To many Americans, the embassy attacks here and in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, have become footnotes in a larger war against terrorism. But in Nairobi, the grassy memorial park created on the site of the ruined embassy is a constant reminder of the blast that killed more than 200 people and injured more than 4,000 - and that remains the source of protests against the United States.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 9, 1999
NEW YORK -- Federal prosecutors in New York charged a Tanzanian man yesterday with helping to carry out the bombing of the U.S. Embassy in his country last year, which along with a nearly simultaneous attack in Nairobi, Kenya, killed more than 200 people and injured thousands.The suspect, Khalfan Khamis Mohamed, 26, was arrested in Cape Town, South Africa, this week and flown to New York, where he was arraigned yesterday before a U.S. district judge in Manhattan.Mohamed entered a plea of innocent to the charges, which also accuse him of conspiring with others in an international terrorist organization led by Osama bin Laden.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 9, 1999
NEW YORK -- Federal prosecutors in New York charged a Tanzanian man yesterday with helping to carry out the bombing of the U.S. Embassy in his country last year, which along with a nearly simultaneous attack in Nairobi, Kenya, killed more than 200 people and injured thousands.The suspect, Khalfan Khamis Mohamed, 26, was arrested in Cape Town, South Africa, this week and flown to New York, where he was arraigned yesterday before a U.S. district judge in Manhattan.Mohamed entered a plea of innocent to the charges, which also accuse him of conspiring with others in an international terrorist organization led by Osama bin Laden.
NEWS
August 15, 1998
NOTHING will compensate for the 12 U.S. citizens, serving their country far from home, who died in the terrorist bombings in East Africa. The nation and its citizens are forever in their debt.The nation's sympathy also goes to the citizens of Kenya and Tanzania. The targets may have been U.S. embassies, but the effect was war on Kenya, where nearly 250 died in Nairobi and some 5,000 were wounded. The casualties were fewer in Dar es Salaam, but Tanzania, an even poorer country, was equally attacked.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 18, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The call came to FBI headquarters from the State Department at 4: 30 on the morning of Aug. 7, describing two major explosions at U.S. embassies in East Africa with a large loss of life. Director Louis J. Freeh's response was crisp."Whatever you need, get it. Get it over there fast," he told his assistant director, Tom Pickard. Freeh's order set in motion the largest overseas investigation ever conducted by the FBI, sending 471 employees to Nairobi, Kenya, and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, to document the carnage, interview witnesses and collect physical evidence.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 18, 1998
NAIROBI, Kenya -- Mohammed Sadiq Odeh, the suspect extradited from Pakistan for questioning here about the twin bombings of U.S. embassies in East Africa, operates under two aliases, according to investigators, and has been identified as a Palestinian.Odeh, 32, is being questioned by agents of the FBI and Kenya's Criminal Investigation Division in Nairobi, who said he has not admitted responsibility for the attacks nor implicated anyone else, although reports from Pakistan at the time of his extradition said he had confessed and named his partners.
NEWS
By SCOTT CALVERT and SCOTT CALVERT,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | March 26, 2006
NAIROBI, Kenya -- The last thing Richard Wamarite saw with two eyes was a truck moving Aug. 7, 1998, toward the American Embassy here in the Kenyan capital. Then an explosion rocked the intersection where the bus he was riding happened to be, and dusk fell over his world. To many Americans, the embassy attacks here and in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, have become footnotes in a larger war against terrorism. But in Nairobi, the grassy memorial park created on the site of the ruined embassy is a constant reminder of the blast that killed more than 200 people and injured more than 4,000 - and that remains the source of protests against the United States.
NEWS
December 10, 1997
Laurean Rugambwa,85, the first African to become a cardinal in the Roman Catholic Church, died Monday in Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania. He was made a bishop in 1951, and Pope John XXIII made him the continent's first cardinal in 1960. There are now 11 African cardinals.Pub Date: 12/10/97
NEWS
November 18, 2002
SCRATCH OFF ANOTHER utopian experiment. Tanzania is abandoning decades of failed socialist policies. The East African country is in the midst of privatizing 400 state-owned companies -- everything from agribusinesses to electric utilities to telecommunications to railroads. The move represents a startling rebuke to the legacy of Julius K. Nyerere, Tanzania's first president, who died three years ago. He wanted to build a socialist state. His goal was self-reliance, which was ironic because Tanzania remained an African weakling financed by foreign donors, chiefly in Scandinavia and West Germany.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 18, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The call came to FBI headquarters from the State Department at 4: 30 on the morning of Aug. 7, describing two major explosions at U.S. embassies in East Africa with a large loss of life. Director Louis J. Freeh's response was crisp."Whatever you need, get it. Get it over there fast," he told his assistant director, Tom Pickard. Freeh's order set in motion the largest overseas investigation ever conducted by the FBI, sending 471 employees to Nairobi, Kenya, and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, to document the carnage, interview witnesses and collect physical evidence.
NEWS
August 25, 1998
MOST OF THE harm in the exchange of explosives between terrorists and the United States was to neither of the above. It was, to use the euphemism of the military, collateral damage. Unintended victims. The innocent.This was notably true of the terrorist attacks on U.S. embassies in Nairobi, Kenya, and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Although 12 U.S. citizens were murdered in the Nairobi attack, so were 247 Kenyans.More than 5,000 people were treated in Kenya's under-equipped hospitals and 542 hospitalized.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 18, 1998
NAIROBI, Kenya -- Mohammed Sadiq Odeh, the suspect extradited from Pakistan for questioning here about the twin bombings of U.S. embassies in East Africa, operates under two aliases, according to investigators, and has been identified as a Palestinian.Odeh, 32, is being questioned by agents of the FBI and Kenya's Criminal Investigation Division in Nairobi, who said he has not admitted responsibility for the attacks nor implicated anyone else, although reports from Pakistan at the time of his extradition said he had confessed and named his partners.
NEWS
August 15, 1998
NOTHING will compensate for the 12 U.S. citizens, serving their country far from home, who died in the terrorist bombings in East Africa. The nation and its citizens are forever in their debt.The nation's sympathy also goes to the citizens of Kenya and Tanzania. The targets may have been U.S. embassies, but the effect was war on Kenya, where nearly 250 died in Nairobi and some 5,000 were wounded. The casualties were fewer in Dar es Salaam, but Tanzania, an even poorer country, was equally attacked.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 19, 2001
NEW YORK - The four terrorists convicted of bombing U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania in 1998 were sentenced yesterday by a federal judge to life in prison without the possibility of parole. The judge, Leonard Sand of the U.S. District Court in Manhattan, also ordered each of the men - Wadih el-Hage, Khalfan Khamis Mohamed, Mohamed Sadeek Odeh and Mohamed Rashed Daoud al-'Owhali - to pay $33 million in restitution to the victims of the bombings. None of the men are believed to have the assets to pay, but prosecutors said in court papers that the required restitution sentence would prevent them from earning money from possible future business endeavors, including writing and publishing a book.
NEWS
By Mark Silva and Carol J. Williams and Mark Silva and Carol J. Williams,Tribune Washington Bureau | June 10, 2009
WASHINGTON - -The first terrorism suspect to be moved from Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to the United States for trial appeared Tuesday in federal court in New York where he pleaded not guilty to 286 murder and conspiracy charges in the bombings of U.S. embassies in Tanzania and Kenya. Ahmed Khalfan Ghailani, a Tanzanian held at Guantanamo since 2006, had been flown to New York under U.S. marshal escort and detained at the Metropolitan Correctional Center. President Barack Obama has pledged to close the Guantanamo prison by January and relocate its 240 prisoners from the U.S. naval base in southern Cuba.
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