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By Marty McGee | January 26, 1991
LAUREL -- Dandy Danzig went past front-running I'm Wild in the final stride to win the $19,000 feature at Laurel Race Course yesterday.Giving jockey Rick Wilson his second straight victory, Dandy Danzig paid $10.40 as third choice in a field of six 3-year-olds.
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By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2002
Adrian Danzig's face can say a lot, especially when he's got his mouth gaped so far open it might harbor bears. The cavernous mouth, the squinty eyes, the whole look is about what you'd expect from a man standing on stage with firecrackers exploding in his kilt. Physical and emotional danger are things many performers try to bring to the stage or screen and fewer manage. The 500 Clown troupe would have you experience the imminence of catastrophe, things unraveling, characters in deepening toil and trouble.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | May 21, 1993
"You sound too old to be somebody who goes to all these rock concerts," began the voice mail message. "My son is the lead guitarist for Danzig. They have an engagement at Hammerjacks on Sunday the 23rd, and I was wondering if you would be interested "He'll do pretty much what I ask him to do.""Oh, she said that, did she?" laughs John Christ, the guitarist in question. "I'll have to speak to her about that."Even so, Christ -- he declines to give his real name, preferring to maintain his family's privacy -- is hardly surprised to find that Mom has been phoning the media on his behalf.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 1, 2000
WASHINGTON - They appeared overnight along the wood-paneled hallways of the Pentagon, like symbols from some ancient civilization. Along the Army's corridor is a picture of a mule kicking a goat, the lines as graceful as a cave painting's. Nearby is a yellow pennant bearing the words "West Point" and a sign, "Army Rules." One floor above, amid the model ships and oil paintings of Navy secretaries, is a single blue and gold pompom, a talisman hanging from the door of Cmdr. Robert Girrier, a 1983 graduate and administrative assistant to Navy Secretary Richard Danzig.
SPORTS
By Marty McGee and Marty McGee,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 12, 1990
LAUREL -- The seventh event at Laurel Race Course yesterday was just an ordinary maiden race. But for the friends and family of Chris Fabifzak, it was a race they never will forget.Fabifzak, 32, who had worked as a groom for trainer Joe Devereux the past three years, died early Friday in Baltimore. A large, jovial, ruddy man, he was the spiritual leader of the J.D. Hogs, an informal, fun-loving group named for friends and employees of Devereux's."He was the type of guy who would do anything for anybody," said Terry Kupfer, one of the Hogs.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 22, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Richard Danzig, the Navy's former No. 2 official and a key figure in resolving the Naval Academy's cheating scandal, has been selected to replace Navy Secretary John H. Dalton, who is retiring, Pentagon sources said yesterday.Defense Secretary William S. Cohen told reporters yesterday that he had forwarded a nominee for the top Navy job to the White House but declined to elaborate. Sources, however, indicated that Danzig was Cohen's choice and that the nomination could be announced soon.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2002
Adrian Danzig's face can say a lot, especially when he's got his mouth gaped so far open it might harbor bears. The cavernous mouth, the squinty eyes, the whole look is about what you'd expect from a man standing on stage with firecrackers exploding in his kilt. Physical and emotional danger are things many performers try to bring to the stage or screen and fewer manage. The 500 Clown troupe would have you experience the imminence of catastrophe, things unraveling, characters in deepening toil and trouble.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 1, 2000
WASHINGTON - They appeared overnight along the wood-paneled hallways of the Pentagon, like symbols from some ancient civilization. Along the Army's corridor is a picture of a mule kicking a goat, the lines as graceful as a cave painting's. Nearby is a yellow pennant bearing the words "West Point" and a sign, "Army Rules." One floor above, amid the model ships and oil paintings of Navy secretaries, is a single blue and gold pompom, a talisman hanging from the door of Cmdr. Robert Girrier, a 1983 graduate and administrative assistant to Navy Secretary Richard Danzig.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 26, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The Army and Navy are looking for a few good high school dropouts.With the nation's full-employment economy proving to be a tough rival in the quest for America's prime youth, the services are turning to those without high school diplomas to fill their thinning ranks.Last week, Army Secretary Louis Caldera said he would look into increasing -- from the current 10 percent -- the number of men and women it recruits with high-school equivalency certificates. And yesterday, Navy Secretary Richard Danzig defended his recent decision to bring in more sailors who lack a high school education.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 25, 1999
WASHINGTON -- This month, in the North Atlantic waters and in a speech by the Navy's top official, came the first tones of the death knell for one of the last male preserves: the submarine.About 144 female Navy ROTC midshipmen are spending 48 hours with male sailors on five submarines, a first for Navy women. Space restrictions now prevent them from serving in the so-called Silent Service.Meanwhile, Navy Secretary Richard Danzig created a stir before the Naval Submarine League Symposium when he called submarines a "white male bastion."
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 25, 1999
WASHINGTON -- This month, in the North Atlantic waters and in a speech by the Navy's top official, came the first tones of the death knell for one of the last male preserves: the submarine.About 144 female Navy ROTC midshipmen are spending 48 hours with male sailors on five submarines, a first for Navy women. Space restrictions now prevent them from serving in the so-called Silent Service.Meanwhile, Navy Secretary Richard Danzig created a stir before the Naval Submarine League Symposium when he called submarines a "white male bastion."
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | May 27, 1999
Defense Secretary William S. Cohen told the newest additions to the U.S. military, 1999's Naval Academy graduates, that Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic is losing the conflict with NATO forces and that there are no plans to cease the bombing."
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 26, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The Army and Navy are looking for a few good high school dropouts.With the nation's full-employment economy proving to be a tough rival in the quest for America's prime youth, the services are turning to those without high school diplomas to fill their thinning ranks.Last week, Army Secretary Louis Caldera said he would look into increasing -- from the current 10 percent -- the number of men and women it recruits with high-school equivalency certificates. And yesterday, Navy Secretary Richard Danzig defended his recent decision to bring in more sailors who lack a high school education.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 22, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Richard Danzig, the Navy's former No. 2 official and a key figure in resolving the Naval Academy's cheating scandal, has been selected to replace Navy Secretary John H. Dalton, who is retiring, Pentagon sources said yesterday.Defense Secretary William S. Cohen told reporters yesterday that he had forwarded a nominee for the top Navy job to the White House but declined to elaborate. Sources, however, indicated that Danzig was Cohen's choice and that the nomination could be announced soon.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | November 25, 1994
If the only stuff you know about Danzig is what you've read in magazines, there's a good chance you have the wrong idea about the band.It isn't just that most of those stories focus on frontman Glenn Danzig's obsession with the dark side, a fascination that is played out in songs with such titles as "Am I Demon," "Snakes of Christ," "Heart of the Devil" and "Until You Call on the Dark." It's hard for any journalist to ignore an angle as tempting as heavy metal and Satanism -- even if there isn't anything there to support it.But as guitarist John Christ explains, there's another side to the story: Glenn Danzig doesn't always come off well in interviews.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | May 21, 1993
"You sound too old to be somebody who goes to all these rock concerts," began the voice mail message. "My son is the lead guitarist for Danzig. They have an engagement at Hammerjacks on Sunday the 23rd, and I was wondering if you would be interested "He'll do pretty much what I ask him to do.""Oh, she said that, did she?" laughs John Christ, the guitarist in question. "I'll have to speak to her about that."Even so, Christ -- he declines to give his real name, preferring to maintain his family's privacy -- is hardly surprised to find that Mom has been phoning the media on his behalf.
NEWS
By Walter Laqueur and Walter Laqueur,The Los Angeles Times | December 27, 1990
A WAR IN THE immediate future has become less likely, which is, of course, good news. At the very least, it provides more time for reflecting on past experiences and future prospects.On May 4, 1939, an article was published in the Paris daily L'Oeuvre titled ''Mourir pour Dantzig?'' (To die for Danzig?), which made journalistic history; never had a single article caused such a storm. The author was Marcel Deat, a former Socialist parliamentarian whose political philosophy had gradually shifted toward a mixture of pacifism and pro-Nazism.
SPORTS
By Marty McGee and Marty McGee,Sun Staff Correspondent | March 3, 1991
LAUREL -- The third and last time Haymaker met Colonel Hill, a big buildup resulted in a letdown, as Forry Cow How stormed past both to win the Star de Naskra Stakes.Since that Jan. 1 meeting, Haymaker and Colonel Hill have won impressively, and both have trained well. They're the likely favorites in a field of nine 3-year-olds in today's $50,000-added Private Terms Stakes at Laurel Race Course.The Private Terms is a prelude to Maryland's only significant Triple Crown prep -- the $175,000 Tesio Stakes two weeks later at Pimlico Race Course.
SPORTS
By Newsday | August 11, 1991
SARATOGA SPRINGS, N.Y. -- The news of Meadow Star's withdrawal from the 111th running of the nation's oldest race for 3-year-old fillies brightened Shug McGaughey's morning. "I was not disappointed," he said from behind a smile. Versailles Treaty brightened the trainer's afternoon.Trainer Leroy Jolley elected to scratch Meadow Star from the Alabama yesterday rather than run on a muddy track. And in the absence of the filly who has won 11 of 12 races against females, Versailles Treaty's stock soared at the betting windows.
SPORTS
By Marty McGee and Marty McGee,Sun Staff Correspondent | March 3, 1991
LAUREL -- The third and last time Haymaker met Colonel Hill, a big buildup resulted in a letdown, as Forry Cow How stormed past both to win the Star de Naskra Stakes.Since that Jan. 1 meeting, Haymaker and Colonel Hill have won impressively, and both have trained well. They're the likely favorites in a field of nine 3-year-olds in today's $50,000-added Private Terms Stakes at Laurel Race Course.The Private Terms is a prelude to Maryland's only significant Triple Crown prep -- the $175,000 Tesio Stakes two weeks later at Pimlico Race Course.
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