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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | October 19, 1993
The World Series continues to be the best bet TV can offer, and this is one series that's proved to be anything but dull. If the Philadelphia Phillies are going to win in the same characteristically nail-biting way the team won Game 2 to even the series against the Toronto Blue Jays, this 1993 World Series ought to be known as "Angst for the Memories."* "World Series Game 3" (8 p.m.-conclusion, WBAL, Channel 11) -- Tonight the series moves to Philadelphia, which means no more designated hitters for the next three games.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 8, 1991
Los Angeles - The hard economic times many Americans are facing have started to affect the television shows they'll be seeing this spring.Producers and stars here are saying that because of the recession, the fictional lives of television characters are being scaled down and stripped of glitz, while more made-for-TV movies about past and present economic crises are being scheduled."
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 9, 1996
"Happy Days" are back on Nickelodeon. Meanwhile, Fox keeps trying to come up with a decent sitcom."The Fresh Prince of Bel Air" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- The casts of "Diff'rent Strokes" and "The Jeffersons" show up as Will Smith and Company say goodbye to prime time in this repeat of May's season- and series-ender. NBC."Melrose Place" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Richard isn't dead! Jake and Allison become a couple! Amanda and Peter keep on keeping on! Yep, the beautiful, nasty people are back for a fifth season, with two new regulars in tow: Rob Estes (Mr. Jodie Bissett in real-life)
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By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1997
The title of our film tonight is "Leo Tolstoy's Anna Karenina." If you're waiting for "Danielle Steel's Anna Karenina" or "Stephen King's Anna Karenina," please return to the lobby.Happily, "Leo Tolstoy's Anna Karenina" actually does hew closely, even reverently, to Leo Tolstoy's "Anna Karenina," arguably literature's greatest piece of romance writing. Perhaps, though, the film could have benefited from a little more Danielle Steel. Or at least a little more sex.Is that a sacrilege? Yes, but at the core of Tolstoy's 19th-century novel is a passion so surpassing, so searing, its consequences sunder lives every which way. Screenwriter and director Bernard Rose ("Immortal Beloved")
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By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | February 2, 2014
Dear Tom Perkins: I'm writing to apologize. I do this on behalf of the 99 percent of us who are not multimillionaires. You, of course, are, having made a pile as a venture capitalist and co-founder of the firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. I admit, I'd have thought a guy like you had little to complain about. But that was before you wrote that tear-jerking Jan. 24 letter to The Wall Street Journal revealing the pain, the oppression, the abject sense of vulnerability and fear that go with having a net worth equal to the GNP of some developing nations.
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By MIKE FEINSILBER | March 15, 1992
Washington. -- American popular culture -- from Madonna to the Super Bowl, from Stephen King to the Reader's Digest -- helped conquer communism and now, for better or worse, is overrunning the world.Figures from the world of scholarship, entertainment and communications disagreed at a conference last week over whether the phenomenon -- "the Americanization of the world" -- was good or bad.But in talks and papers presented at a conference of the American Enterprise Institute, a think tank, they generally agreed it was happening.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun TV Critic | October 21, 1991
"Danielle Steel's Palomino" is smart stuff.That's right. Tonight's made-for-TV movie, about a New York photographer who goes out west on assignment and falls in love with a modern-day cowboy, is S-M-A-R-T.I know that might be a little hard to accept at first. Newspaper reviews generally have dealt with TV versions of Ms. Steel's work in only a couple of ways.The popular novelist's works have been mocked as cliche-ridden, formulaic froth. They also have been discussed as counterprogramming against sports -- Ms. Steel for female viewers, football and baseball for men.The counterprogramming angle deserves attention.
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By Steve McKerrow | April 1, 1991
For many Americans -- as well as in the preponderance of media -- the Persian Gulf war is understood in stark terms: Bad guy Saddam Hussein invaded the little country of Kuwait, the United Nations coalition drew a line in the sand, gave the new Hitler an ultimatum and finally went in and forced him out.OK, so why is there still savage fighting in Iraq? We hear about at least four factions -- Kurds, Shiites, Palestinians and Saddam's Revolutionary Guard. What's the difference between them?
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | September 12, 1994
This is the day on which the syndicated TV market goes crazy, with first-run shows and off-network reruns added to the mix -- including new talk shows headed by Suzanne Somers and Gordon Elliott. The more noteworthy news, however, is prime time, where this week before the "official" fall season looks a lot like the first week OF the fall season.* "Coach." (8-8:30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- It always made sense, to me, to consider moving "Coach" to Monday nights, where it could lead quite nicely into the same network's "Monday Night Football."
NEWS
By From Sun news services | October 30, 2008
Actor Joaquin Phoenix says goodbye to film, hello to music Joaquin Phoenix says he's "not doing films anymore." He made the announcement Monday at a fundraising event for Paul Newman's camps for kids. Extra's Jerry Penacoli asked "Are you serious?" Phoenix answered, "Yeah. I'm working on my music. I'm done. I've been through that." Phoenix's rep confirmed the news to Extra with the response, "That is what he told me." The 34-year-old performer gave no further details on his career plans - but he has been working on a record for some time with Britain's The Charlatans, People reports on its Web site.
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