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By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2000
Danielle Steel and Scott Turow are all wet. So are more than a thousand books by other novelists after a fire sprinkler malfunctioned in the Towson library yesterday minutes before the library opened, drenching the fiction shelves. "It just went off, a huge rush of water," said librarian Joe Thompson, who was standing near the fiction section putting books onto shelves when the sprinkler erupted. "I just stared for the first couple seconds." Thompson and other workers sprang into action, ripping books from the shelves and grabbing wastebaskets to bail the mounting pools of water.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | October 24, 1994
Carol Burnett returns with a new variety special -- lending some variety to an otherwise too-quiet night. During the day, though, two new series premiere that are welcome offerings for pre-school viewers. They're arriving in the Nick of time, as part of the Nick Jr. lineup on Nickelodeon.* "Melrose Place." (8-9 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Some of the hospital staffers take a modeling job -- which might mean a temporary relocation to "Models Inc." That spinoff show is in desperate need of some ratings help, so it wouldn't surprise me. Fox.* "Danielle Steel's 'Family Album.
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By Ramsey Campbell and Ramsey Campbell,Orlando Sentinel | January 5, 1994
Connie Mason leads a double life.To neighbors and friends, Ms. Mason, a 63-year-old Lake County, Fla., grandmother, is best known for her prowess at duplicate bridge and line dancing.For millions of strangers, Ms. Mason is their passport to exotic worlds filled with passion, adventure and romance.As a top writer for Leisure Books, with 21 novels to her credit, she is one of the queens of supermarket romance. Check out these titles: "Tender Fury," "My Lady Vixen," "Desert Ecstasy," "Tempt the Devil," "Caress and Conquer," "Promised Splendor," "Ice & Rapture," "Wild Land, Wild Love," and "Bold Land, Bold Love."
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1997
The title of our film tonight is "Leo Tolstoy's Anna Karenina." If you're waiting for "Danielle Steel's Anna Karenina" or "Stephen King's Anna Karenina," please return to the lobby.Happily, "Leo Tolstoy's Anna Karenina" actually does hew closely, even reverently, to Leo Tolstoy's "Anna Karenina," arguably literature's greatest piece of romance writing. Perhaps, though, the film could have benefited from a little more Danielle Steel. Or at least a little more sex.Is that a sacrilege? Yes, but at the core of Tolstoy's 19th-century novel is a passion so surpassing, so searing, its consequences sunder lives every which way. Screenwriter and director Bernard Rose ("Immortal Beloved")
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | February 2, 2014
Dear Tom Perkins: I'm writing to apologize. I do this on behalf of the 99 percent of us who are not multimillionaires. You, of course, are, having made a pile as a venture capitalist and co-founder of the firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. I admit, I'd have thought a guy like you had little to complain about. But that was before you wrote that tear-jerking Jan. 24 letter to The Wall Street Journal revealing the pain, the oppression, the abject sense of vulnerability and fear that go with having a net worth equal to the GNP of some developing nations.
NEWS
By MIKE FEINSILBER | March 15, 1992
Washington. -- American popular culture -- from Madonna to the Super Bowl, from Stephen King to the Reader's Digest -- helped conquer communism and now, for better or worse, is overrunning the world.Figures from the world of scholarship, entertainment and communications disagreed at a conference last week over whether the phenomenon -- "the Americanization of the world" -- was good or bad.But in talks and papers presented at a conference of the American Enterprise Institute, a think tank, they generally agreed it was happening.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | April 1, 1991
For many Americans -- as well as in the preponderance of media -- the Persian Gulf war is understood in stark terms: Bad guy Saddam Hussein invaded the little country of Kuwait, the United Nations coalition drew a line in the sand, gave the new Hitler an ultimatum and finally went in and forced him out.OK, so why is there still savage fighting in Iraq? We hear about at least four factions -- Kurds, Shiites, Palestinians and Saddam's Revolutionary Guard. What's the difference between them?
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | September 12, 1994
This is the day on which the syndicated TV market goes crazy, with first-run shows and off-network reruns added to the mix -- including new talk shows headed by Suzanne Somers and Gordon Elliott. The more noteworthy news, however, is prime time, where this week before the "official" fall season looks a lot like the first week OF the fall season.* "Coach." (8-8:30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- It always made sense, to me, to consider moving "Coach" to Monday nights, where it could lead quite nicely into the same network's "Monday Night Football."
NEWS
By From Sun news services | October 30, 2008
Actor Joaquin Phoenix says goodbye to film, hello to music Joaquin Phoenix says he's "not doing films anymore." He made the announcement Monday at a fundraising event for Paul Newman's camps for kids. Extra's Jerry Penacoli asked "Are you serious?" Phoenix answered, "Yeah. I'm working on my music. I'm done. I've been through that." Phoenix's rep confirmed the news to Extra with the response, "That is what he told me." The 34-year-old performer gave no further details on his career plans - but he has been working on a record for some time with Britain's The Charlatans, People reports on its Web site.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Evening Sun Staff | October 16, 1990
If you looked closely at the walls in the background of "Kaleidoscope" last night, you might have noticed what appeared to be a painting by Mark Rothko hanging in the apartment of the character played by Jaclyn Smith. And that was certainly an Ellsworth Kelly canvas at her office.Such a display is the touch of Douglas Cramer, who was executive producer of "Kaleidoscope" and tonight's "Fine Things," both based on books by Danielle Steel. That's because Cramer has one of this country's most renowned collections of contemporary American art and is on the boards of numerous museums and other cultural organizations.
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