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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | August 19, 1995
Maryland Public Television uncovers a pair of marathons in hopes of reaping a big pot of pledges in the final weekend of its August membership push. The Canadian Football League Stallions are also in action in -- Tennessee?* "Chrome Dreams: A Motorweek Special Presented by John Davis" (2:30 p.m.-7 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67) -- Once considered merely a noisy nuisance that scared horses -- the real working machines -- the automobile went on to transform our culture. The host of the weekly automotive show produced at MPT offers a history of the horseless carriage.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | October 24, 1994
Carol Burnett returns with a new variety special -- lending some variety to an otherwise too-quiet night. During the day, though, two new series premiere that are welcome offerings for pre-school viewers. They're arriving in the Nick of time, as part of the Nick Jr. lineup on Nickelodeon.* "Melrose Place." (8-9 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Some of the hospital staffers take a modeling job -- which might mean a temporary relocation to "Models Inc." That spinoff show is in desperate need of some ratings help, so it wouldn't surprise me. Fox.* "Danielle Steel's 'Family Album.
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By Ramsey Campbell and Ramsey Campbell,Orlando Sentinel | January 5, 1994
Connie Mason leads a double life.To neighbors and friends, Ms. Mason, a 63-year-old Lake County, Fla., grandmother, is best known for her prowess at duplicate bridge and line dancing.For millions of strangers, Ms. Mason is their passport to exotic worlds filled with passion, adventure and romance.As a top writer for Leisure Books, with 21 novels to her credit, she is one of the queens of supermarket romance. Check out these titles: "Tender Fury," "My Lady Vixen," "Desert Ecstasy," "Tempt the Devil," "Caress and Conquer," "Promised Splendor," "Ice & Rapture," "Wild Land, Wild Love," and "Bold Land, Bold Love."
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By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1997
The title of our film tonight is "Leo Tolstoy's Anna Karenina." If you're waiting for "Danielle Steel's Anna Karenina" or "Stephen King's Anna Karenina," please return to the lobby.Happily, "Leo Tolstoy's Anna Karenina" actually does hew closely, even reverently, to Leo Tolstoy's "Anna Karenina," arguably literature's greatest piece of romance writing. Perhaps, though, the film could have benefited from a little more Danielle Steel. Or at least a little more sex.Is that a sacrilege? Yes, but at the core of Tolstoy's 19th-century novel is a passion so surpassing, so searing, its consequences sunder lives every which way. Screenwriter and director Bernard Rose ("Immortal Beloved")
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By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | February 2, 2014
Dear Tom Perkins: I'm writing to apologize. I do this on behalf of the 99 percent of us who are not multimillionaires. You, of course, are, having made a pile as a venture capitalist and co-founder of the firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. I admit, I'd have thought a guy like you had little to complain about. But that was before you wrote that tear-jerking Jan. 24 letter to The Wall Street Journal revealing the pain, the oppression, the abject sense of vulnerability and fear that go with having a net worth equal to the GNP of some developing nations.
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By Phil Rosenthal and Phil Rosenthal,Los Angeles Daily News | May 1, 1992
Los Angeles -- There just aren't enough courtroom dramas playing out on television these days, are there?The latest to be thrown into the mix is NBC's two-part movie "Trial: The Price of Passion," scheduled for 9 p.m. Sunday and Monday, and it's not all that interesting -- even for fiction.It's on a par with Danielle Steel for realism, but not quite as romantic -- a hokey, sex-filled soap opera based on improbable coincidences and cookie-cutter characters that's lifted only by a cast that includes Peter Strauss, Beverly D'Angelo, Jill Clayburgh and Ned Beatty.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun TV Critic | October 21, 1991
"Danielle Steel's Palomino" is smart stuff.That's right. Tonight's made-for-TV movie, about a New York photographer who goes out west on assignment and falls in love with a modern-day cowboy, is S-M-A-R-T.I know that might be a little hard to accept at first. Newspaper reviews generally have dealt with TV versions of Ms. Steel's work in only a couple of ways.The popular novelist's works have been mocked as cliche-ridden, formulaic froth. They also have been discussed as counterprogramming against sports -- Ms. Steel for female viewers, football and baseball for men.The counterprogramming angle deserves attention.
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By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Evening Sun Staff | October 16, 1990
If you looked closely at the walls in the background of "Kaleidoscope" last night, you might have noticed what appeared to be a painting by Mark Rothko hanging in the apartment of the character played by Jaclyn Smith. And that was certainly an Ellsworth Kelly canvas at her office.Such a display is the touch of Douglas Cramer, who was executive producer of "Kaleidoscope" and tonight's "Fine Things," both based on books by Danielle Steel. That's because Cramer has one of this country's most renowned collections of contemporary American art and is on the boards of numerous museums and other cultural organizations.
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By Steve McKerrow | April 1, 1991
For many Americans -- as well as in the preponderance of media -- the Persian Gulf war is understood in stark terms: Bad guy Saddam Hussein invaded the little country of Kuwait, the United Nations coalition drew a line in the sand, gave the new Hitler an ultimatum and finally went in and forced him out.OK, so why is there still savage fighting in Iraq? We hear about at least four factions -- Kurds, Shiites, Palestinians and Saddam's Revolutionary Guard. What's the difference between them?
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 19, 1997
"Gun," the new anthology series from executive producer Robert Altman, tries to live up to its pedigree. It's not there yet."Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Supes is on the trail of a killer who's got a taste for corporate bigwigs. ABC."Hollywood Confidential" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WNUV, Channel 54) -- Edward James Olmos is a 20-year vet of the L.A.P.D. who now heads up a private detective agency "staffed primarily with talented misfits who couldn't fit into the conventional world of law enforcement."
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