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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | October 19, 1993
The World Series continues to be the best bet TV can offer, and this is one series that's proved to be anything but dull. If the Philadelphia Phillies are going to win in the same characteristically nail-biting way the team won Game 2 to even the series against the Toronto Blue Jays, this 1993 World Series ought to be known as "Angst for the Memories."* "World Series Game 3" (8 p.m.-conclusion, WBAL, Channel 11) -- Tonight the series moves to Philadelphia, which means no more designated hitters for the next three games.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 8, 1991
Los Angeles - The hard economic times many Americans are facing have started to affect the television shows they'll be seeing this spring.Producers and stars here are saying that because of the recession, the fictional lives of television characters are being scaled down and stripped of glitz, while more made-for-TV movies about past and present economic crises are being scheduled."
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 9, 1996
"Happy Days" are back on Nickelodeon. Meanwhile, Fox keeps trying to come up with a decent sitcom."The Fresh Prince of Bel Air" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- The casts of "Diff'rent Strokes" and "The Jeffersons" show up as Will Smith and Company say goodbye to prime time in this repeat of May's season- and series-ender. NBC."Melrose Place" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Richard isn't dead! Jake and Allison become a couple! Amanda and Peter keep on keeping on! Yep, the beautiful, nasty people are back for a fifth season, with two new regulars in tow: Rob Estes (Mr. Jodie Bissett in real-life)
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | February 2, 2014
Dear Tom Perkins: I'm writing to apologize. I do this on behalf of the 99 percent of us who are not multimillionaires. You, of course, are, having made a pile as a venture capitalist and co-founder of the firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. I admit, I'd have thought a guy like you had little to complain about. But that was before you wrote that tear-jerking Jan. 24 letter to The Wall Street Journal revealing the pain, the oppression, the abject sense of vulnerability and fear that go with having a net worth equal to the GNP of some developing nations.
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By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1997
The title of our film tonight is "Leo Tolstoy's Anna Karenina." If you're waiting for "Danielle Steel's Anna Karenina" or "Stephen King's Anna Karenina," please return to the lobby.Happily, "Leo Tolstoy's Anna Karenina" actually does hew closely, even reverently, to Leo Tolstoy's "Anna Karenina," arguably literature's greatest piece of romance writing. Perhaps, though, the film could have benefited from a little more Danielle Steel. Or at least a little more sex.Is that a sacrilege? Yes, but at the core of Tolstoy's 19th-century novel is a passion so surpassing, so searing, its consequences sunder lives every which way. Screenwriter and director Bernard Rose ("Immortal Beloved")
NEWS
By MIKE FEINSILBER | March 15, 1992
Washington. -- American popular culture -- from Madonna to the Super Bowl, from Stephen King to the Reader's Digest -- helped conquer communism and now, for better or worse, is overrunning the world.Figures from the world of scholarship, entertainment and communications disagreed at a conference last week over whether the phenomenon -- "the Americanization of the world" -- was good or bad.But in talks and papers presented at a conference of the American Enterprise Institute, a think tank, they generally agreed it was happening.
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By Steve McKerrow | April 1, 1991
For many Americans -- as well as in the preponderance of media -- the Persian Gulf war is understood in stark terms: Bad guy Saddam Hussein invaded the little country of Kuwait, the United Nations coalition drew a line in the sand, gave the new Hitler an ultimatum and finally went in and forced him out.OK, so why is there still savage fighting in Iraq? We hear about at least four factions -- Kurds, Shiites, Palestinians and Saddam's Revolutionary Guard. What's the difference between them?
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | September 12, 1994
This is the day on which the syndicated TV market goes crazy, with first-run shows and off-network reruns added to the mix -- including new talk shows headed by Suzanne Somers and Gordon Elliott. The more noteworthy news, however, is prime time, where this week before the "official" fall season looks a lot like the first week OF the fall season.* "Coach." (8-8:30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- It always made sense, to me, to consider moving "Coach" to Monday nights, where it could lead quite nicely into the same network's "Monday Night Football."
NEWS
By BARBARA SAMSON MILLS FROST THE FIDDLER Janice Weber. St. Martin's Press. 338 pages. $19.95 | October 25, 1992
AMERICAN GIRLMary Cantwell.Random House.209 pages. $20."American Girl" is a joyous book. Author Mary Cantwell remembers her childhood in Bristol, R.I., a typical American town in the 1930s: "Bristol Harbor is enclosed by two claws, a big claw which is the town itself and a little claw called Poppasquash Point -- and sailboats dance on it in summer. Lobster boats plow through it all year round and so does the dumpy Prudence Island ferry."She reminds readers of the way we were -- Jack Benny on the radio, a white graduation dress that "falls like a cloud," the smell of saltwater, sachet and privet.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | July 30, 1996
How would you feel if, after years of toil, training and suffering, you had turned yourself into the world's best, only to have the moment tainted by a sense of underachievement?If that happened, you would be in good company, since you'd be joined by Michael Johnson, whose golden moment, a win in the 400-meter run, was tarnished by the weight of NBC's expectations.Before the race, NBC hands from Bob Costas to race callers Tom Hammond and Craig Masback set the table for Johnson's certain demonstration of superiority, with Masback implying that with the Olympic Stadium track yielding world records in other sprints, Johnson would do no less.
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