Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDanielle Steel
IN THE NEWS

Danielle Steel

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2000
Danielle Steel and Scott Turow are all wet. So are more than a thousand books by other novelists after a fire sprinkler malfunctioned in the Towson library yesterday minutes before the library opened, drenching the fiction shelves. "It just went off, a huge rush of water," said librarian Joe Thompson, who was standing near the fiction section putting books onto shelves when the sprinkler erupted. "I just stared for the first couple seconds." Thompson and other workers sprang into action, ripping books from the shelves and grabbing wastebaskets to bail the mounting pools of water.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 29, 2008
DOROTHY SARNOFF, 94 Self-help pioneer Sweaty palms, nervous laughter, a Brooklyn accent, panic-induced silences. These were just a few of the image blemishes addressed by Dorothy Sarnoff, an opera singer and Broadway star who had a much bigger second career as one of the first, and most influential, image consultants, coaxing stage-worthy performances from business executives preparing a big speech, ambassadors on their way to foreign assignments and...
FEATURES
By Ramsey Campbell and Ramsey Campbell,Orlando Sentinel | January 5, 1994
Connie Mason leads a double life.To neighbors and friends, Ms. Mason, a 63-year-old Lake County, Fla., grandmother, is best known for her prowess at duplicate bridge and line dancing.For millions of strangers, Ms. Mason is their passport to exotic worlds filled with passion, adventure and romance.As a top writer for Leisure Books, with 21 novels to her credit, she is one of the queens of supermarket romance. Check out these titles: "Tender Fury," "My Lady Vixen," "Desert Ecstasy," "Tempt the Devil," "Caress and Conquer," "Promised Splendor," "Ice & Rapture," "Wild Land, Wild Love," and "Bold Land, Bold Love."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 8, 1991
Los Angeles - The hard economic times many Americans are facing have started to affect the television shows they'll be seeing this spring.Producers and stars here are saying that because of the recession, the fictional lives of television characters are being scaled down and stripped of glitz, while more made-for-TV movies about past and present economic crises are being scheduled."
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1997
The title of our film tonight is "Leo Tolstoy's Anna Karenina." If you're waiting for "Danielle Steel's Anna Karenina" or "Stephen King's Anna Karenina," please return to the lobby.Happily, "Leo Tolstoy's Anna Karenina" actually does hew closely, even reverently, to Leo Tolstoy's "Anna Karenina," arguably literature's greatest piece of romance writing. Perhaps, though, the film could have benefited from a little more Danielle Steel. Or at least a little more sex.Is that a sacrilege? Yes, but at the core of Tolstoy's 19th-century novel is a passion so surpassing, so searing, its consequences sunder lives every which way. Screenwriter and director Bernard Rose ("Immortal Beloved")
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 29, 1996
Up for 51 straight Bugs Bunny cartoons? Who wouldn't be? So check out the Cartoon Network already."Renegade" (6 p.m.-7 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Stephen J. Cannell's production team has been responsible for a handful of TV mainstays, ranging from the classic ("The Rockford Files") to the camp classic ("The A-Team"). Here's a chance to see if he can act, as his character here becomes a U.S. marshal."It's Academic" (7 p.m.-7: 30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Championship teams from Baltimore (Mount St. Joseph)
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | April 1, 1991
For many Americans -- as well as in the preponderance of media -- the Persian Gulf war is understood in stark terms: Bad guy Saddam Hussein invaded the little country of Kuwait, the United Nations coalition drew a line in the sand, gave the new Hitler an ultimatum and finally went in and forced him out.OK, so why is there still savage fighting in Iraq? We hear about at least four factions -- Kurds, Shiites, Palestinians and Saddam's Revolutionary Guard. What's the difference between them?
FEATURES
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Evening Sun Staff | October 15, 1990
ONE LOOK AT "Kaleidoscope," NBC's movie tonight, tells you both why Danielle Steel sells a zillion of the books she churns out and why they make such lousy movies.And that's not lousy in the way a Judith Krantz or Jackie Collins book is lousy -- a low-taste, trashy, offensive sort of way -- but lousy in the sense that they just don't have the stuff to make it on the screen."Kaleidoscope," which will be on Channel 2 (WMAR) at 9 o'clock, is the opening jab in the combination NBC has to counter this week's sports programming.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | September 12, 1994
This is the day on which the syndicated TV market goes crazy, with first-run shows and off-network reruns added to the mix -- including new talk shows headed by Suzanne Somers and Gordon Elliott. The more noteworthy news, however, is prime time, where this week before the "official" fall season looks a lot like the first week OF the fall season.* "Coach." (8-8:30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- It always made sense, to me, to consider moving "Coach" to Monday nights, where it could lead quite nicely into the same network's "Monday Night Football."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun TV Critic | October 21, 1991
"Danielle Steel's Palomino" is smart stuff.That's right. Tonight's made-for-TV movie, about a New York photographer who goes out west on assignment and falls in love with a modern-day cowboy, is S-M-A-R-T.I know that might be a little hard to accept at first. Newspaper reviews generally have dealt with TV versions of Ms. Steel's work in only a couple of ways.The popular novelist's works have been mocked as cliche-ridden, formulaic froth. They also have been discussed as counterprogramming against sports -- Ms. Steel for female viewers, football and baseball for men.The counterprogramming angle deserves attention.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.