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NEWS
November 19, 1999
DANIEL NATHANS represented the very best of Johns Hopkins. A brilliant scientist who won a Nobel Prize, a quiet but effective leader who for two crucial years presided over the university and medical system, Dr. Nathans inspired students, researchers, professors and administrators.This unflappable figure became a living legend on the Hopkins campus. It was richly deserved. He was, after all, the father of modern biotechnology.Dr. Nathans found ways to use certain enzymes to unlock the genetic secrets of the DNA double helix.
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NEWS
November 19, 1999
DANIEL NATHANS represented the very best of Johns Hopkins. A brilliant scientist who won a Nobel Prize, a quiet but effective leader who for two crucial years presided over the university and medical system, Dr. Nathans inspired students, researchers, professors and administrators.This unflappable figure became a living legend on the Hopkins campus. It was richly deserved. He was, after all, the father of modern biotechnology.Dr. Nathans found ways to use certain enzymes to unlock the genetic secrets of the DNA double helix.
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NEWS
By David Folkenflik and Douglas Birch and David Folkenflik and Douglas Birch,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1999
Dr. Daniel Nathans, the brilliant and reticent Nobel Prize-winning scientist who was regarded by many of his peers as the conscience of the Johns Hopkins University, died yesterday of leukemia at his home. He was 71.Proud and passionate about ideas, Dr. Nathans helped Hopkins sustain its sense of tradition during a time that brought wrenching changes to academic medical centers. In addition to teaching and conducting research, Dr. Nathans served the university as a valued adviser and interim president.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and Douglas Birch and David Folkenflik and Douglas Birch,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1999
Dr. Daniel Nathans, the brilliant and reticent Nobel Prize-winning scientist who was regarded by many of his peers as the conscience of the Johns Hopkins University, died yesterday of leukemia at his home. He was 71.Proud and passionate about ideas, Dr. Nathans helped Hopkins sustain its sense of tradition during a time that brought wrenching changes to academic medical centers. In addition to teaching and conducting research, Dr. Nathans served the university as a valued adviser and interim president.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,Sun Staff Writer | May 8, 1995
Daniel Nathans is a patient man. But some things simply are too important to put off. That's why the Nobel Prize-winning researcher is willing to keep the Johns Hopkins University president's seat warm for the next six months or so while trustees search for someone else to take the post."
NEWS
October 21, 1993
APPLYING the basic sciences to human disease has been a hallmark of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine since it opened its doors in 1893. The school was the first to give doctors the luxury of being paid to do medical research, producing a long list of Hopkins "firsts" that helped revolutionize the practice of medicine.The fruits of that policy were on display again last month when Hopkins molecular biologist Daniel Nathans was awarded the National Medal of Science by President Clinton at a White House ceremony.
NEWS
October 2, 1995
MICHAEL R. BLOOMBERG's pledge of $55 million brings confidence to the Johns Hopkins University, the most important institution in metropolitan Baltimore, at a crucial time.The gift is to be distributed among all schools of the university, reinforcing the dependence of each on the vigor and reputation of the others. It comes midway through the Johns Hopkins Initiative, which now enjoys commitments of $467 million toward its fund-raising goal of $900 million by February 2000.This generosity coincides with a presidential search, which has been delayed by the diversion of trustee attention toward restructuring the governance of Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions in East Baltimore.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | January 9, 1996
The Howard Hughes Medical Institute will distribute $80 million over the next four years to 30 U.S. medical schools -- including $3.4 million to the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine -- to shore up their research facilities, the institute announced today.Officials at the Chevy Chase-based research philanthropy intend the money to help support younger faculty members, pilot studies and communication technology."Academic medical centers across the country are being squeezed by reductions in patient-care revenues and restrictions on government research spending," Dr. Purnell W. Choppin, the institute's president, said in a written statement.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | August 8, 1996
The Johns Hopkins University and Hospital received a record $125.9 million in gifts from private donors for the year ending June 30, buoying campus officials intent on raising $900 million by February 2000."
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1996
The Johns Hopkins University moved yesterday to plug a gap in its administration, naming anesthesiologist Edward D. Miller to be interim dean of the school of medicine, effective March 1.Dr. Michael E. Johns, the current dean, said in December that he would leave Hopkins in June to become chancellor of medical affairs at Emory University. The announcement of his departure, along with that of Executive Vice Dean David A. Blake in January, sparked an outcry among some medical professors who were concerned that they would not be ably represented as Johns Hopkins' medical institutions enter the new marketplace of managed health care.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,Sun Staff Writer | May 8, 1995
Daniel Nathans is a patient man. But some things simply are too important to put off. That's why the Nobel Prize-winning researcher is willing to keep the Johns Hopkins University president's seat warm for the next six months or so while trustees search for someone else to take the post."
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Staff Writer | September 28, 1993
So what is left in life for a scientist who has already won the Nobel Prize?The National Medal of Science, that's what. And Dr. Daniel Nathans, a Johns Hopkins molecular biologist, said yesterday that he will be a happy man when the medal is bestowed on him by President Clinton at a White House ceremony Thursday."
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,Sun Staff Writer | April 22, 1995
The Johns Hopkins University yesterday named one of its Nobel-Prize winning faculty members to lead the school as it searches for a permanent president.Dr. Daniel Nathans, 66, a physician and professor at the Hopkins School of Medicine for half his life, will become Hopkins' interim president on June 1, university officials said.Dr. Nathans, who shared a Nobel Prize in 1978, takes over from President William C. Richardson, who will leave the campus June 15 and become president of the W. K. Kellogg Foundation in Battle Creek, Mich.
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