Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDaniel Hege
IN THE NEWS

Daniel Hege

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 9, 1997
Daniel Hege should be nervous.He's only just begun his first season as the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's assistant conductor, he's only 31 and he's about to lead his first week of classical subscription concerts. Moreover, he will be conducting for one of the most celebrated soloists alive -- violinist-violist Pinchas Zukerman -- in a series of concerts that begins tonight in Meyerhoff Hall and concludes Sunday afternoon in a high-profile appearance at the Kennedy Center."I don't get that nervous -- unless something isn't prepared well," the conductor says calmly.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 27, 2000
Lara Webber has been going at a vivace tempo all day. Early that morning, she left Cooperstown, N.Y., where she has been assisting with an opera production, and drove to the Albany airport. She had to change a flat tire on the way. After arriving in Baltimore, she was whisked off to a round of media interviews. By the time she's finished with a radio appearance and reaches Meyerhoff Hall, it's 3 p.m., and she's practically panting for food. But the unpretentious and affable Weber still exudes enthusiasm about her new job - assistant conductor of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 29, 1997
As the Baltimore Symphony's tour of Japan was winding down Thursday evening after its next-to-last concert in Osaka, music director David Zinman was stricken with a kidney stone and had to be flown home to Baltimore yesterday afternoon.What kept Zinman from joining his orchestra at a late-night Thanksgiving celebration and prevented him from conducting the final concert of the tour last night in Tokyo's Suntory Hall turned into a triumph for young Daniel Hege, the orchestra's assistant conductor.
FEATURES
By David Donovan and David Donovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 29, 1999
The Mahler Symphony No.1 is one of the most ambitious and impressive first symphonies in music history. It employs a massive orchestra and the variety of thematic material is awesome. Unfortunately Daniel Hege and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra did not meet its challenges. There were many fine touches in all four movements but the magic of the music was always just beyond the BSO's grasp.The first movement did have a promising start. The opening high string chords were wonderfully atmospheric.
NEWS
By Jenny Komatsu and Jenny Komatsu,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | November 5, 1995
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra has announced the appointment of Daniel Hege, a 30-year-old associate conductor for the Kansas City Symphony Orchestra, as the new assistant conductor for the BSO.Mr. Hege received a bachelor's degree in music from Bethel College in Kansas and a master's degree in orchestral conducting from the University of Utah. As the winner of the BMI Incorp-Lional Newman Conducting Scholarship, he studied with conductor Daniel Lewis at the University of Southern California for three years.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 18, 1997
The Baltimore Symphony's summer season begins outdoors June 27 at 8 p.m. with an Oregon Ridge concert that features music from the "Star Wars" trilogy, "2001: A Space Odyssey," Holst's "The Planets" and an after-concert fireworks display.But some of the season's most impressive musical fireworks will come indoors in Meyerhoff Hall in the programs designed by violinist-violist-conductor Pinchas Zukerman, who was appointed last year as artistic director of the orchestra's annual Summer MusicFest.
FEATURES
By David Donovan and David Donovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 29, 1999
The Mahler Symphony No.1 is one of the most ambitious and impressive first symphonies in music history. It employs a massive orchestra and the variety of thematic material is awesome. Unfortunately Daniel Hege and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra did not meet its challenges. There were many fine touches in all four movements but the magic of the music was always just beyond the BSO's grasp.The first movement did have a promising start. The opening high string chords were wonderfully atmospheric.
NEWS
December 14, 1997
THE BALTIMORE Symphony Orchestra's successful nine-concert tour of six Japanese cities in 11 days solidified the orchestra's appeal and reputation in the most important market for Western classical music with the youngest and most discerning audiences in the world, three years after its first triumphant tour there.While American audiences are aging and American and European record contracts are drying up, East Asia becomes more important, even during its economic troubles.In the last year of David Zinman's conducting tenure, setting the stage for the great Russian, Yuri Temirkanov, who takes up the Baltimore baton in January 2000, the BSO reminded the Japanese of its glorious music.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 27, 2000
Lara Webber has been going at a vivace tempo all day. Early that morning, she left Cooperstown, N.Y., where she has been assisting with an opera production, and drove to the Albany airport. She had to change a flat tire on the way. After arriving in Baltimore, she was whisked off to a round of media interviews. By the time she's finished with a radio appearance and reaches Meyerhoff Hall, it's 3 p.m., and she's practically panting for food. But the unpretentious and affable Weber still exudes enthusiasm about her new job - assistant conductor of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra.
FEATURES
March 1, 1998
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra has announced its schedule for next season. Performances for the Casual Concerts are identified with an asterisk (*).Celebrity SeriesSept. 17-19Gunther Herbig, conductorManuel Barrueco, guitarBeethoven: "Egmont" OvertureSteven Stucky: Guitar Concerto (world premiere)Beethoven: Symphony No. 3 in E-flat major, "Eroica"Oct. 8-9 (Oct. 10 - Casual)Alan Gilbert, conductorBridgett Hooks, sopranoLars Vogt, pianoBeethoven: "Ah! Perfido" *Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 4 *Beethoven: Symphony No. 6, "Pastorale"Oct.
NEWS
December 14, 1997
THE BALTIMORE Symphony Orchestra's successful nine-concert tour of six Japanese cities in 11 days solidified the orchestra's appeal and reputation in the most important market for Western classical music with the youngest and most discerning audiences in the world, three years after its first triumphant tour there.While American audiences are aging and American and European record contracts are drying up, East Asia becomes more important, even during its economic troubles.In the last year of David Zinman's conducting tenure, setting the stage for the great Russian, Yuri Temirkanov, who takes up the Baltimore baton in January 2000, the BSO reminded the Japanese of its glorious music.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 29, 1997
As the Baltimore Symphony's tour of Japan was winding down Thursday evening after its next-to-last concert in Osaka, music director David Zinman was stricken with a kidney stone and had to be flown home to Baltimore yesterday afternoon.What kept Zinman from joining his orchestra at a late-night Thanksgiving celebration and prevented him from conducting the final concert of the tour last night in Tokyo's Suntory Hall turned into a triumph for young Daniel Hege, the orchestra's assistant conductor.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 18, 1997
The Baltimore Symphony's summer season begins outdoors June 27 at 8 p.m. with an Oregon Ridge concert that features music from the "Star Wars" trilogy, "2001: A Space Odyssey," Holst's "The Planets" and an after-concert fireworks display.But some of the season's most impressive musical fireworks will come indoors in Meyerhoff Hall in the programs designed by violinist-violist-conductor Pinchas Zukerman, who was appointed last year as artistic director of the orchestra's annual Summer MusicFest.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 9, 1997
Daniel Hege should be nervous.He's only just begun his first season as the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's assistant conductor, he's only 31 and he's about to lead his first week of classical subscription concerts. Moreover, he will be conducting for one of the most celebrated soloists alive -- violinist-violist Pinchas Zukerman -- in a series of concerts that begins tonight in Meyerhoff Hall and concludes Sunday afternoon in a high-profile appearance at the Kennedy Center."I don't get that nervous -- unless something isn't prepared well," the conductor says calmly.
NEWS
By Jenny Komatsu and Jenny Komatsu,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | November 5, 1995
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra has announced the appointment of Daniel Hege, a 30-year-old associate conductor for the Kansas City Symphony Orchestra, as the new assistant conductor for the BSO.Mr. Hege received a bachelor's degree in music from Bethel College in Kansas and a master's degree in orchestral conducting from the University of Utah. As the winner of the BMI Incorp-Lional Newman Conducting Scholarship, he studied with conductor Daniel Lewis at the University of Southern California for three years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | March 13, 1997
In 1994 when she was only 17 years old, violist Nokuthula Ngwenyama became one of the youngest winners in the history of the Young Concert Artists International Auditions. While the teen-age Ngwenyama is still a student at the Curtis Institute in Philadelphia, she's already enjoying an international career.This brilliant young musician joins conductor Daniel Hege and the Baltimore Symphony next week for a performance of Bela Bartok's Viola Concerto in the orchestra's sixth annual celebration of African-American talent, "Live, Gifted and Black."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | January 28, 1999
Big sounds for little earsThe Baltimore Symphony Orchestra will be at its boldest, brassiest best Saturday as conductor Daniel Hege leads a ``Brilliant Brass'' program for children. Showcasing the musicians of the BSO's brass section, the Classically Kids Series program includes a performance of Tchaikovsky's ``1812 Overture'' with narrator Rheda Becker. The event is designed for families with children ages 7 to 12.The program takes place Saturday at 11 a.m. at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St. $9. Call 410-783-8000.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.