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NEWS
By Mike Adams and Mike Adams,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 27, 2003
WASHINGTON - More than 30 years ago, Daniel Ellsberg helped to end the Vietnam War by leaking the Pentagon Papers. Yesterday, he was arrested near the White House as he and other protesters called for an end to the war in Iraq. Ellsberg, 71, said the government is up to its old tricks, with the Bush administration engaging in a pattern of deception he finds reminiscent of what he discovered in the Pentagon Papers and their secret history of the war in Vietnam. The reason for the new war, he said, is as simple as a three-letter word: "oil."
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NEWS
June 6, 2014
I was surprised by your editorial on the NBC interview with Edward Snowden ( "Snowden speaks," May 29). I consider myself fairly objective, yet I heard very different responses from Mr. Snowden than the editorial suggests. It was almost a cognitive dissonance, as though I had watched a different show. For example, I did not hear Mr. Snowden saying he would like to be a hero. I heard a highly intelligent and relatively humble Mr. Snowden saying he did what he felt was right for the American people.
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NEWS
January 23, 2006
Anthony Franciosa, 77, whose strong portrayals of moody, troubled characters made him a Hollywood star in the 1950s and '60s but whose combative behavior on movie sets hampered his career, died Thursday at a Los Angeles hospital after suffering a stroke. From his first important film role as the brother of a drug addict in A Hatful of Rain, Mr. Franciosa became known for his portrayals of complicated young men. On television, he starred in Valentine's Day, The Name of the Game and Matt Helm.
NEWS
July 30, 2013
There was no question that Pfc. Bradley Manning broke the law when he released hundreds of thousands of classified documents to Wikileaks. He admitted as much in pleading guilty to a number of the lesser charges against him, and his motivations - whatever they were - and his evident naivete didn't change that fact. Nonetheless, the case against him was a vexing one. It was never clear that his actions harmed national security in the way the Obama administration claimed, and his mistreatment during a portion of the time he has been held in custody was deplorable.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | November 20, 1993
WASHINGTON -- In what has been called the last battle of the Cold War, longtime liberal activist Morton Halperin faced the Senate Armed Services Committee yesterday and defended his thoughts and actions on policies from Vietnam to Somalia.Mr. Halperin, President Clinton's most controversial nominee since Lani Guinier, faces a tough fight for confirmation as assistant secretary of defense for democracy and peacekeeping. His opponents charge that the former Vietnam anti-war activist and CIA critic now is too eager to send troops abroad under the United Nations banner, and is unfit for a sensitive Pentagon post.
NEWS
November 29, 2012
Finally, the trial of the century made the front page of The Sun ("Accused WikiLeaker to ask for dismissal," Nov. 26). I will join others outside the main gate to Fort Meade to show support for the whistleblower Pfc. Bradley Manning during his latest hearing. Some generations ago, Daniel Ellsberg took the risks of peace and released the Pentagon Papers. The papers revealed how the U.S. government consistently lied about the imperial war in Vietnam. For that remarkable action, Mr. Ellsberg faced the full wrath of the Nixon administration, which was one of the most crooked of all time.
NEWS
June 6, 2014
I was surprised by your editorial on the NBC interview with Edward Snowden ( "Snowden speaks," May 29). I consider myself fairly objective, yet I heard very different responses from Mr. Snowden than the editorial suggests. It was almost a cognitive dissonance, as though I had watched a different show. For example, I did not hear Mr. Snowden saying he would like to be a hero. I heard a highly intelligent and relatively humble Mr. Snowden saying he did what he felt was right for the American people.
NEWS
July 30, 2013
There was no question that Pfc. Bradley Manning broke the law when he released hundreds of thousands of classified documents to Wikileaks. He admitted as much in pleading guilty to a number of the lesser charges against him, and his motivations - whatever they were - and his evident naivete didn't change that fact. Nonetheless, the case against him was a vexing one. It was never clear that his actions harmed national security in the way the Obama administration claimed, and his mistreatment during a portion of the time he has been held in custody was deplorable.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joan Mellen and By Joan Mellen,Special to the Sun | May 4, 2003
With the millennium has arrived a flood of books about Vietnam, as if only through the safety net of history can the present be freely examined. Many are by Vietnam veterans, some by former CIA intelligence agents. One particularly engaging memoir is by Daniel Ellsberg, a former and notorious Pentagon analyst who became an anti-war activist. Yet all tell the same story. The U. S. government persistently and deliberately lied to the public, not only about the size of Vietnamese forces and the number of Vietnamese and American dead, but about virtually everything, from the purported North Vietnamese shelling of American ships in the Gulf of Tonkin, to the supposedly heroic rescue of the men of the Mayaguez, the "last battle" of the war. Henry Kissinger and then-President Gerald Ford knowingly abandoned three Marines on a tiny Cambodian island, where they were promptly executed by the Khmer Rouge.
NEWS
By Jack Fruchtman Jr | June 25, 1996
A QUARTER OF a century almost exactly separates the Pentagon Papers case of 1971 and the recent unanimous decision of a three-judge federal panel in Philadelphia overturning the government's attempt to outlaw pornography on the Internet. The two cases are victories for the First Amendment, not for any particular political ideology.Although the U.S. will likely appeal the Internet decision overturning most of the Communications Decency Act (CDA), the Supreme Court will confirm the lower court's decision because this is a First Amendment court.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | July 3, 2013
As we celebrate the birth by revolution of this country, let's take a moment to put some historical context to the actions of Edward Snowden and to consider whether he is a traitor or a patriot. Back in the 1780s, when everyone in America was by definition a traitor, a spy or an insurgent as far as England was concerned, the Founding Fathers included language in the Constitution that defined treason - the only crime so defined in the document - so that citizens could not be executed for merely speaking out against the country's leadership.
NEWS
November 29, 2012
Finally, the trial of the century made the front page of The Sun ("Accused WikiLeaker to ask for dismissal," Nov. 26). I will join others outside the main gate to Fort Meade to show support for the whistleblower Pfc. Bradley Manning during his latest hearing. Some generations ago, Daniel Ellsberg took the risks of peace and released the Pentagon Papers. The papers revealed how the U.S. government consistently lied about the imperial war in Vietnam. For that remarkable action, Mr. Ellsberg faced the full wrath of the Nixon administration, which was one of the most crooked of all time.
NEWS
January 23, 2006
Anthony Franciosa, 77, whose strong portrayals of moody, troubled characters made him a Hollywood star in the 1950s and '60s but whose combative behavior on movie sets hampered his career, died Thursday at a Los Angeles hospital after suffering a stroke. From his first important film role as the brother of a drug addict in A Hatful of Rain, Mr. Franciosa became known for his portrayals of complicated young men. On television, he starred in Valentine's Day, The Name of the Game and Matt Helm.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joan Mellen and By Joan Mellen,Special to the Sun | May 4, 2003
With the millennium has arrived a flood of books about Vietnam, as if only through the safety net of history can the present be freely examined. Many are by Vietnam veterans, some by former CIA intelligence agents. One particularly engaging memoir is by Daniel Ellsberg, a former and notorious Pentagon analyst who became an anti-war activist. Yet all tell the same story. The U. S. government persistently and deliberately lied to the public, not only about the size of Vietnamese forces and the number of Vietnamese and American dead, but about virtually everything, from the purported North Vietnamese shelling of American ships in the Gulf of Tonkin, to the supposedly heroic rescue of the men of the Mayaguez, the "last battle" of the war. Henry Kissinger and then-President Gerald Ford knowingly abandoned three Marines on a tiny Cambodian island, where they were promptly executed by the Khmer Rouge.
NEWS
By Mike Adams and Mike Adams,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 27, 2003
WASHINGTON - More than 30 years ago, Daniel Ellsberg helped to end the Vietnam War by leaking the Pentagon Papers. Yesterday, he was arrested near the White House as he and other protesters called for an end to the war in Iraq. Ellsberg, 71, said the government is up to its old tricks, with the Bush administration engaging in a pattern of deception he finds reminiscent of what he discovered in the Pentagon Papers and their secret history of the war in Vietnam. The reason for the new war, he said, is as simple as a three-letter word: "oil."
NEWS
By Jack Fruchtman Jr | June 25, 1996
A QUARTER OF a century almost exactly separates the Pentagon Papers case of 1971 and the recent unanimous decision of a three-judge federal panel in Philadelphia overturning the government's attempt to outlaw pornography on the Internet. The two cases are victories for the First Amendment, not for any particular political ideology.Although the U.S. will likely appeal the Internet decision overturning most of the Communications Decency Act (CDA), the Supreme Court will confirm the lower court's decision because this is a First Amendment court.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | July 3, 2013
As we celebrate the birth by revolution of this country, let's take a moment to put some historical context to the actions of Edward Snowden and to consider whether he is a traitor or a patriot. Back in the 1780s, when everyone in America was by definition a traitor, a spy or an insurgent as far as England was concerned, the Founding Fathers included language in the Constitution that defined treason - the only crime so defined in the document - so that citizens could not be executed for merely speaking out against the country's leadership.
FEATURES
July 12, 1993
THIS DATE IN HISTORY: JULY 12In 100 B.C., the Roman Emperor Julius Caesar was born.In 1543, England's King Henry VIII married his sixth and last wife, Catherine Parr, who outlived him.In 1690 (by the New Style calendar), Protestant forces led by William of Orange defeated the Roman Catholic army of James II at the Battle of the Boyne in Ireland.In 1817, naturalist-author Henry David Thoreau was born in Concord, Mass.In 1854, George Eastman, inventor of the Kodak camera, was born in Waterville, N.Y.In 1862, Congress authorized the Medal of Honor.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | November 20, 1993
WASHINGTON -- In what has been called the last battle of the Cold War, longtime liberal activist Morton Halperin faced the Senate Armed Services Committee yesterday and defended his thoughts and actions on policies from Vietnam to Somalia.Mr. Halperin, President Clinton's most controversial nominee since Lani Guinier, faces a tough fight for confirmation as assistant secretary of defense for democracy and peacekeeping. His opponents charge that the former Vietnam anti-war activist and CIA critic now is too eager to send troops abroad under the United Nations banner, and is unfit for a sensitive Pentagon post.
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