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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 25, 2002
NEW YORK - As Bill the Butcher in Martin Scorsese's Gangs of New York, Daniel Day-Lewis wears skyscraping stovepipe hats, long coats and patterned vests and waistcoats. The wardrobe makes the already lanky actor look as if he walks at carriage height. Set in the brutal Five Points neighborhood of lower Manhattan between 1846 and 1863, the movie presents a gang-war vision of New York City history. Scorsese renames the real-life Bill Poole "Bill Cutting" and makes him the leader of the "Nativists" (native-born Americans)
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Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2013
Here's a reveal that should surprise no one: Best Actor Oscar winner Daniel Day-Lewis, famous for going to any length necessary to flesh out his film roles, actually grew a beard for "Lincoln. " Like he would have worn a fake one? Asked what it felt like to be wearing a beard during filming, a humorously incredulous Day-Lewis retorted, "What do you mean wearing it? Do you wear your hair?" The questions got better after that, as Day-Lewis talked about his initial reticence about playing such an iconic American as our 16th president.
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February 25, 2008
BEST ACTOR Daniel Day-Lewis There Will Be Blood BEST ACTRESS Marion Cotillard La Vie en Rose SUPPORTING ACTOR Javier Bardem No Country for Old Men SUPPORTING ACTRESS Tilda Swinton Michael Clayton
ENTERTAINMENT
Los Angeles Times | February 25, 2013
Being snubbed might have been the best thing to happen to Ben Affleck. His film “Argo” took the best picture Oscar on Sunday night at the 85 th Academy Awards - more than a little solace, perhaps, for being snubbed in the directing category. Other marquee winners were Daniel Day-Lewis for lead actor for “Lincoln,” Jennifer Lawrence for lead actress for “Silver Linings Playbook,” and Ang Lee for director for “Life of Pi,” which won four Oscars, the most for any film.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | January 11, 2008
More oil and sweat than passion and ideas course through There Will Be Blood, a film about the California petroleum boom of the early 20th century that is as anemic as it is ambitious. Writer-director Paul Thomas Anderson has crafted a rise-and-fall film of the least imaginative kind. From 1898 through the Roaring '20s, the central character, Daniel Plainview, achieves towering financial success. Morally he scrapes the bottom of the barrel. With Daniel Day-Lewis as this monomaniacal oil baron, the central character, who is also nearly the only character, should have some heft.
ENTERTAINMENT
Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2013
Here's a reveal that should surprise no one: Best Actor Oscar winner Daniel Day-Lewis, famous for going to any length necessary to flesh out his film roles, actually grew a beard for "Lincoln. " Like he would have worn a fake one? Asked what it felt like to be wearing a beard during filming, a humorously incredulous Day-Lewis retorted, "What do you mean wearing it? Do you wear your hair?" The questions got better after that, as Day-Lewis talked about his initial reticence about playing such an iconic American as our 16th president.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | November 3, 2012
Yesterday my worthy colleague Phillip Blanchard posted this opening from a New York Times article on Daniel Day-Lewis and his portrayal of Abraham Lincoln in the new Steven Spielberg film about Lincoln's last days: “NOW he belongs to the ages,” Edwin Stanton, Abraham Lincoln 's secretary of war, said at the president's deathbed. “And to the studios,” he could have added. Perhaps we should be grateful that Charles McGrath, the writer, did not clunk up the lead by adding at the end of that sentence: had he lived in the twenty-first century rather than the nineteenth . Still, the anachronism grates.
NEWS
December 12, 2012
A faulty blackboard sealed Russell Matthew's acting fate. As he took the prop on stage during a skit, it immediately fell apart. "I took a chance to save face and ad-libbed a lament on the funding of our public school system," the Silver Spring resident says. "The laughs I got that morning fueled me to pursue acting after school and I never looked back. " Matthews, 25, a native of Bloomington, Ill., has been acting since he was in high school. He is currently on a national tour of "A Christmas Carol" with the Nebraska Theatre Company.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | June 29, 1993
Sunday's wedding of actress Julia Roberts to musician Lyle Lovett caught most of the media's entertainment reporters by surprise: spokespeople for Liz Smith, Cindy Adams and other established tattlers said they were delighted for the couple but had "no comment" on missing one of the biggest entertainment scoops of the year.Linda Ellman, supervising producer for "Entertainment Tonight," sees the discreet ceremony in Marion, Ind., as a victory for Ms. Roberts after several years of being hounded by the press.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 20, 2002
SUN SCORE **1/2 When a director as gifted as Martin Scorsese works with talented craftsmen on an enormous scale, the size of his ambition alone can catalyze a hypnotic effect. This aesthetic X-factor - the X stands for artful extravagance - keeps you watching Gangs of New York even if you don't buy a minute of it. Based on Herbert Asbury's 1928 historical catalog of the toughs and tarts who reigned in pre-World War I New York, Scorsese's picture is a fantastic urban spectacle that wants to be an operatic epic.
NEWS
December 12, 2012
A faulty blackboard sealed Russell Matthew's acting fate. As he took the prop on stage during a skit, it immediately fell apart. "I took a chance to save face and ad-libbed a lament on the funding of our public school system," the Silver Spring resident says. "The laughs I got that morning fueled me to pursue acting after school and I never looked back. " Matthews, 25, a native of Bloomington, Ill., has been acting since he was in high school. He is currently on a national tour of "A Christmas Carol" with the Nebraska Theatre Company.
NEWS
By David Horsey | December 11, 2012
Two new movies, "Lincoln" and "Hyde Park on the Hudson," are intimate portraits of the two most consequential presidents of the United States. They are timely reminders that politics has never been pretty and our leaders have never been prefect human beings, but that, without Abraham Lincoln and Franklin Delano Roosevelt, our country might have been lost to the disintegrating influence of lesser men. "Lincoln" is such a stunningly good movie that...
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | November 25, 2012
He had lost a son many years before, the boy barely more than a toddler when he died. Now another son was dead, and grief sat on him like the shawl that draped his shoulders as he rattled around the big, cold house. His wife was emotionally troubled and spent money they did not have. His subordinates were insubordinate, convinced he was out of his depth and that they could do a better job. And his country had split along a ragged seam of geography and race, boys from Maine and Vermont fighting it out against boys from Georgia and Tennessee, their bodies left broken, bloated, bloody and fly-swarmed, dead by the profligate thousands.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | November 3, 2012
Yesterday my worthy colleague Phillip Blanchard posted this opening from a New York Times article on Daniel Day-Lewis and his portrayal of Abraham Lincoln in the new Steven Spielberg film about Lincoln's last days: “NOW he belongs to the ages,” Edwin Stanton, Abraham Lincoln 's secretary of war, said at the president's deathbed. “And to the studios,” he could have added. Perhaps we should be grateful that Charles McGrath, the writer, did not clunk up the lead by adding at the end of that sentence: had he lived in the twenty-first century rather than the nineteenth . Still, the anachronism grates.
FEATURES
February 25, 2008
BEST ACTOR Daniel Day-Lewis There Will Be Blood BEST ACTRESS Marion Cotillard La Vie en Rose SUPPORTING ACTOR Javier Bardem No Country for Old Men SUPPORTING ACTRESS Tilda Swinton Michael Clayton
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | January 11, 2008
More oil and sweat than passion and ideas course through There Will Be Blood, a film about the California petroleum boom of the early 20th century that is as anemic as it is ambitious. Writer-director Paul Thomas Anderson has crafted a rise-and-fall film of the least imaginative kind. From 1898 through the Roaring '20s, the central character, Daniel Plainview, achieves towering financial success. Morally he scrapes the bottom of the barrel. With Daniel Day-Lewis as this monomaniacal oil baron, the central character, who is also nearly the only character, should have some heft.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | September 17, 1993
"The Age of Innocence"Starring Daniel Day-Lewis, Michelle Pfeiffer and Winona RyderDirected by Martin ScorseseReleased by ColumbiaRated PG*** 1/2The irony in the title is the snapper: "The Age of Innocence" is about the least innocent age ever, except for the one that came before and the one that came after and the one we are in now. Edith Wharton's point is exquisitely amplified by Martin Scorsese's vivid recreation of her novel: There is no innocence, innocence is an illusion. There is only society and its tribalism, its quietly murderous ways of enforcing order among the brethren, and nobody, not even the richest, the most privileged, the most beautiful, is free to follow his heart's desires.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | November 25, 2012
He had lost a son many years before, the boy barely more than a toddler when he died. Now another son was dead, and grief sat on him like the shawl that draped his shoulders as he rattled around the big, cold house. His wife was emotionally troubled and spent money they did not have. His subordinates were insubordinate, convinced he was out of his depth and that they could do a better job. And his country had split along a ragged seam of geography and race, boys from Maine and Vermont fighting it out against boys from Georgia and Tennessee, their bodies left broken, bloated, bloody and fly-swarmed, dead by the profligate thousands.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Allis and Sam Allis,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 1, 2005
The Rosetta Stone to decipher Ralph Fiennes just may be, of all things, Maid in Manhattan, the ghastly movie he made with Jennifer Lopez that came and went like a cold sore in 2002. The man can deliver a shimmering portrait of Nazi evil in Schindler's List or a brilliant Hamlet on Broadway, but what he can't uncork is a guy -- an unintrospective, untortured male of the species -- and it was a guy he had to play in the Lopez disaster. "I've always ... I've always ... I don't know ... I've never been part ... of what they call clubable," he says with a fractured elegance.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 25, 2002
NEW YORK - As Bill the Butcher in Martin Scorsese's Gangs of New York, Daniel Day-Lewis wears skyscraping stovepipe hats, long coats and patterned vests and waistcoats. The wardrobe makes the already lanky actor look as if he walks at carriage height. Set in the brutal Five Points neighborhood of lower Manhattan between 1846 and 1863, the movie presents a gang-war vision of New York City history. Scorsese renames the real-life Bill Poole "Bill Cutting" and makes him the leader of the "Nativists" (native-born Americans)
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