Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDangerous Liaisons
IN THE NEWS

Dangerous Liaisons

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 7, 1992
Talk about strange bedfellows, can you imagine Michael Jackson and Ludwig von Beethoven cohabiting on the same compact disc? They can and do on "Dangerous," Mr. Jackson's most recent album. But the unlikely musical marriage has produced an unwanted offspring: a lawsuit.It seems the Cleveland Orchestra objects to Mr. Jackson having "sampled" a 1 minute, 7 second excerpt from its 1961 CBS Records recording of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony -- a form of electronic borrowing common among rap musicians.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lindsey McPherson | February 9, 2012
So apparently Esther, mother of the original vampires, isn't the forgiving person she made herself out to be last episode.   But before I give you the juicy details, let me give you the background.   How is it that Esther is alive after Klaus killed her? An old Bennett witch used magic to preserve her body. That's the reason only Bonnie and her mother could open the casket. She drew power from them and the other Bennett witches who were with her “on the other side,” which is where she's been for 1,000 years, being punished for turning her family into vampires.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lindsey McPherson | February 2, 2012
Mothers love their children no matter what. Apparently that statement is true even for the witch mother of the original family of vampires whose hybrid son “killed” her.   This episode, Bonnie and her mother Abbie, through their combined witch powers, are able to open to magic-sealed coffin. In it was Klaus' mother, who goes to Klaus and asks if he knows why she is here.   “You're here to kill me,” he responds through tears.   She says: “Niklaus, you are my son. And I am here to forgive you.”   Then she turns to Elijah, Rebecca and their two original brothers (Elijah undaggered the others)
NEWS
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY | January 28, 2007
COUSIN BETTE -- Acorn Media -- $39.99 The woman howls. There is no other word for it. In Cousin Bette, which is being released Tuesday on DVD, actress Margaret Tyzack's mouth contorts into a yawning chasm when her character learns that the young sculptor whom she rescued is betrothed to another. Her lips are wet with saliva. One arm rises above her head in a gesture that is savage but oddly lacking in force, a reminder of the way extreme passion can simultaneously galvanize and weaken us. She goes into a half-crouch.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 8, 1998
Eighteenth-century writer Choderlos de Laclos, whose novel "Les Liaisons Dangereuses" chronicled the rampant amorality of the French aristocracy just before its cataclysmic demise in the revolution of 1789, once expressed the hope that his incendiary work would be talked about long after his death.He's gotten his wish.Hollywood employed Glenn Close, Michelle Pfeiffer and John Malkovich to turn "Dangerous Liaisons" into a riveting film in 1988. It has become an opera, and in 1985 British playwright Christopher Hampton adapted it for the stage at the behest of London's Royal Shakespeare Company.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | March 5, 1999
When Buffy is good, she is very good, and when she is bad, she is horrid.In this case, horrid is very good indeed, as the actress who plays TV's "Buffy the Vampire Slayer," Sarah Michelle Gellar, portrays a consummate villain in the new movie "Cruel Intentions."Yet another adaptation of the 18th-century novel "Les Liaisons Dangereuses," it's a tale of unlikely yet wickedly amusing debauchery and manipulation among the teen set.The nearly perfect film "Dangerous Liaisons" starred Glenn Close as the well-respected but secretly sinister manipulator and John Malkovich as the oily seducer, her partner in deception.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | January 25, 1991
"Some actors," says the British director Stephen Frears, with a mordant, almost blackly humorous laugh, "have a way of just claiming a role. You don't cast them. You try not to cast them in fact. Yet somehow they claim it."And that's what happened in "The Grifters."Frears is noted for unusual casting choices. In "Dangerous Liaisons," for example, he worked against precedent and put Americans Glenn Close and John Malkovich into the center of sexual intrigue in pre-Revolutionary France. The movie dazzled critics and viewers alike.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 18, 1995
In a world where everybody wants to direct, it figures that the man who has made an astonishing directorial debut at the age of 49 never wanted to direct."
NEWS
By Rene Rodriguez and Rene Rodriguez,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | August 4, 1996
Why does Keanu Reeves appear to be "on" in some movies, and simply sleepwalking through others? Every time he seems close to definitively settling the question of "Can he really act?" he delivers a performance that makes you change your mind again.Reeves does excel at playing the perpetually dim bulb. Movies like "Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure" (1989), "Parenthood" (1989) and "I Love You to Death" (1990) all fit. Give him a role that allows him to carry on with eyelids at half-mast and recite dialogue like "Bodacious!"
NEWS
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY | January 28, 2007
COUSIN BETTE -- Acorn Media -- $39.99 The woman howls. There is no other word for it. In Cousin Bette, which is being released Tuesday on DVD, actress Margaret Tyzack's mouth contorts into a yawning chasm when her character learns that the young sculptor whom she rescued is betrothed to another. Her lips are wet with saliva. One arm rises above her head in a gesture that is savage but oddly lacking in force, a reminder of the way extreme passion can simultaneously galvanize and weaken us. She goes into a half-crouch.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2001
KALAHEO, Hawaii - Imagine a place where the living is so easy that the only issue is: What's the best way to have sex? There would be fantastical flirtations, in raiment ranging from the beautiful to the bizarre. A few solitary types would decide that attracting a partner was just too much trouble. But many more would seek out pairings that, over time, became intensely intimate. For up to 5 million years, that's the way life evolved among the flowering plants of Hawaii. Seeking to mate fertile pollen with unformed seeds, the plants developed wiles for luring birds, bees and bugs into their reproductive schemes.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | March 5, 1999
When Buffy is good, she is very good, and when she is bad, she is horrid.In this case, horrid is very good indeed, as the actress who plays TV's "Buffy the Vampire Slayer," Sarah Michelle Gellar, portrays a consummate villain in the new movie "Cruel Intentions."Yet another adaptation of the 18th-century novel "Les Liaisons Dangereuses," it's a tale of unlikely yet wickedly amusing debauchery and manipulation among the teen set.The nearly perfect film "Dangerous Liaisons" starred Glenn Close as the well-respected but secretly sinister manipulator and John Malkovich as the oily seducer, her partner in deception.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 8, 1998
Eighteenth-century writer Choderlos de Laclos, whose novel "Les Liaisons Dangereuses" chronicled the rampant amorality of the French aristocracy just before its cataclysmic demise in the revolution of 1789, once expressed the hope that his incendiary work would be talked about long after his death.He's gotten his wish.Hollywood employed Glenn Close, Michelle Pfeiffer and John Malkovich to turn "Dangerous Liaisons" into a riveting film in 1988. It has become an opera, and in 1985 British playwright Christopher Hampton adapted it for the stage at the behest of London's Royal Shakespeare Company.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 13, 1996
At a point in "The Secret Agent," a mildly retarded young man laboriously draws a picture of what he sees. What he sees is: circles within circles within circles.Obviously, he'd been looking at the plot, not the people."The Secret Agent" is set at the turn of the century, but it feels like it just came out of John le Carre's word processor yesterday, not Joseph Conrad's fountain pen in 1907; it has all the high tropes of the existential espionage novel except a Wall. That includes nihilist terrorists, cynical cops, supercilious controllers, betrayed wives, a politician desperate to cover his own rear and, the point of connection between them all, a little spy, more acted upon than acting, yet never quite so innocent as he pretends to be.This poor fellow is one Verloc (Bob Hoskins)
NEWS
By Rene Rodriguez and Rene Rodriguez,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | August 4, 1996
Why does Keanu Reeves appear to be "on" in some movies, and simply sleepwalking through others? Every time he seems close to definitively settling the question of "Can he really act?" he delivers a performance that makes you change your mind again.Reeves does excel at playing the perpetually dim bulb. Movies like "Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure" (1989), "Parenthood" (1989) and "I Love You to Death" (1990) all fit. Give him a role that allows him to carry on with eyelids at half-mast and recite dialogue like "Bodacious!"
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 18, 1995
In a world where everybody wants to direct, it figures that the man who has made an astonishing directorial debut at the age of 49 never wanted to direct."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 13, 1996
At a point in "The Secret Agent," a mildly retarded young man laboriously draws a picture of what he sees. What he sees is: circles within circles within circles.Obviously, he'd been looking at the plot, not the people."The Secret Agent" is set at the turn of the century, but it feels like it just came out of John le Carre's word processor yesterday, not Joseph Conrad's fountain pen in 1907; it has all the high tropes of the existential espionage novel except a Wall. That includes nihilist terrorists, cynical cops, supercilious controllers, betrayed wives, a politician desperate to cover his own rear and, the point of connection between them all, a little spy, more acted upon than acting, yet never quite so innocent as he pretends to be.This poor fellow is one Verloc (Bob Hoskins)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.