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NEWS
May 7, 2004
On May 5, 2004, BERTHA M. DANFORTH (nee Chiveral), beloved wife of the late Robert S. Danforth, Sr., devoted mother of Margaret Tantses, Kathleen Spittel, Bonne Saum, Robert S. Danforth, Jr., Thomas H. Cordner and Susan E. Cordner. Also survived by many loving grandchildren and great-grandchildren Friends may call on Saturday and Sunday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. at the Mac Nabb Funeral Home, 301 Frederick Rd., Catonsville (at Beltway Exit 13). A graveside service will be held on Tuesday at 10 A.M. at Baltimore National Cemetery
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SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | October 11, 2009
Moments after completing the half marathon Saturday, Ethan Alden-Danforth dropped to one knee. Sure, he was pooped. But he really did it to propose. Having just dashed 13 miles through city streets with his girlfriend by his side, Alden-Danforth knelt before his running mate and asked for her hand. "I love you with all my heart," said the Johns Hopkins graduate student, still wearing his grimy togs. "Will you marry me?" Jennifer Albert nodded. Eyes glistening, she whispered, "Yes." He took her hand and placed a diamond ring on her finger.
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NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 20, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The craggy face could be hewn from Mount Rushmore. The hair, with its bright white flash, is equally signal. The voice, deep, clear and resonant, is nothing less than cavernous. Even the nickname is impressive -- "Saint Jack."By any measure -- and he is 6 feet 3 inches tall -- Sen. John Claggett Danforth, 55, is a patrician presence, never more so than during the confirmation hearings of Judge Clarence Thomas.But the Republican from Missouri will be seen in a surprisingly different political posture tomorrow, turning from resolute champion of a conservative Supreme Court nominee to enthusiastic sponsor of a liberal civil rights bill.
NEWS
October 3, 2006
On September 30, 2006, JOHN CLIFFE of Westminster, MD; devoted father of Doug C. Gregory and wife Kimberly J.; brother of Richard Gregory, Catherine Danforth and Mary Anderson. Also survived by ex-wife, Shirley E. (nee Dearth) Gregory. Friends may call Wednesday, 7 to 9 at the Eline Funeral Home, 934 S. Main Street, Hampstead, MD 21074. Services and interment at convenience of family. Contributions to Golden Retriever Rescue, Education and Training Inc., P.O. Box 3069, Falls Church, VA 22043.
NEWS
By The Kansas City Star | February 2, 1993
ST. LOUIS -- Sen. John Danforth, 56, the father of the modern Republican Party in Missouri, says he will not seek re-election next year."Public service, however enjoyable, is only a part of life," the lawmaker said yesterday. "It has been important for me to see it that way. I do not want to cling to it as though my whole identity is decided by elections, for it is not."Mr. Danforth's announcement was one of the best-kept secrets in recent Missouri politics, shocking some of his supporters and kicking over a hive of potential candidates.
NEWS
By JAMES J. KILPATRICK | August 13, 1991
Washington. -- Sen. John Danforth now has given up on President Bush. The Missouri Republican will make no further effort to find a compromise on a civil rights bill. Instead, he will join forces with Senate Democrats to get action as soon as the Congress reconvenes on Sept. 9.Very well. With some reservations, and with one derisive hoot, I am prepared to say, go ahead and pass the Danforth bill. A few lawyers will get rich; a few blacks and women may benefit; a few whites will suffer discrimination in reverse, but the heavens won't fall.
NEWS
By Arch Parsons and Arch Parsons,Washington Bureau of The Sun Lyle Denniston of The Sun's Washington Bureau contributed to this article | October 3, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Judge Clarence Thomas is likely to receive as many as 60 Senate votes to confirm his nomination as a Supreme Court justice, according to the private estimate of his chief Senate sponsor, Missouri Republican John C. Danforth.The Senate floor debate on whether to confirm President Bush's black conservative nominee is scheduled to begin today. The Senate is to vote on the confirmation at 6 p.m. Tuesday.A source close to Mr. Danforth, speaking on the basis of anonymity, revealed the estimate yesterday while the senator himself, a respected vote-counter in the Senate, was being publicly optimistic -- but more cautious.
NEWS
By Neil A. Lewis and Neil A. Lewis,New York Times News Service | October 7, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Two days before the Senate is scheduled to vote on his nomination to the Supreme Court, Judge Clarence Thomas was publicly accused yesterday of sexually harassing a law professor at the University of Oklahoma Law Center during the two years that she served as his personal assistant in the federal government.Anita F. Hill, a tenured professor of law at Oklahoma, charged in an affidavit submitted to the Senate Judiciary Committee last month that when she worked for Mr. Thomas over a two-year period beginning in 1981, he frequently asked her out and when she refused he spoke to her in detail about pornographic films he had seen.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 10, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Former Sen. John C. Danforth pledged yesterday to ask "the dark questions" about the deadly standoff at Waco and to determine the truth about two broad, potentially explosive issues: Did federal officials kill people at the Branch Davidian compound, and was there a cover-up afterward?Danforth officially took the helm of an independent investigation of the Texas fiasco, assuming the mantle of "special counsel," the first such investigator since the Watergate-era law that created the independent counsel was allowed to lapse in June.
NEWS
July 28, 2000
THE CONSPIRACY theorists won't be satisfied. But for the rest of us, the recently released interim report of special counsel John C. Danforth on the 1993 raid on the Branch Davidian compound in Waco ends questions about federal wrongdoing. Mr. Danforth, the respected former Republican senator from Missouri, was brought in to investigate allegations that federal agents started the fire at the compound in which 80 people died and that a conspiracy ensued to hide that fact. That those agents were not responsible for the deadly incident and, therefore, there was no attempted government cover-up, was stated by Mr. Danforth in the strongest terms last week.
NEWS
By JILL ROSEN and JILL ROSEN,SUN REPORTER | December 30, 2005
The past few years on New Year's Eve, as most of Baltimore caroused, all fireworks, auld lang syne and boozy revelry, a bright-eyed band of idealists packed picnic baskets, buttoned their warmest coats and climbed their hill. At the crest, with the city's lights glowing below them and a line of trees that have seen hundreds of Decembers at their backs, they raised a glass to the forest - and to hoping against hope that they could stop a deal that would raze much of it for an athletic complex.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | June 22, 2005
ARLINGTON, Va. - John C. Danforth, a former U.S. senator and ambassador to the United Nations, has performed a valuable service between elections by writing about a Christian's role in contemporary American society. In an op-ed for The New York Times on Friday, Mr. Danforth, an ordained minister, observed: "Many conservative Christians approach politics with a certainty that they know God's truth, and that they can advance the kingdom of God through governmental action." He writes that the "only absolute standard of behavior is the commandment to love our neighbors as ourselves."
NEWS
December 16, 2004
JOHN C. Danforth says he is both awed and a little annoyed by American idealism. As U.S. ambassador to the United Nations and during his earlier career as a U.S. senator, Mr. Danforth said he's been frequently approached by countrymen who were appalled at whatever humanitarian crisis was under way and demanded we move swiftly to fix it. Such encounters are especially frequent now as the violence, horror and death in Darfur mount daily. "Some have said if the U.S. really cared, if we really cared enough, we'd stop it. ... We'd put an end to this atrocity," Ambassador Danforth related in a speech at Georgetown University last week.
NEWS
By David L. Greene, Laura Sullivan and Mark Matthews and David L. Greene, Laura Sullivan and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 3, 2004
WASHINGTON - President Bush has picked former New York police commissioner Bernard Kerik to serve as Homeland Security secretary, tapping a seasoned cop who played a key role in his city's response to the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Kerik's nomination was confirmed by senior administration officials last night, capping a busy day of staff changes in the top tier of the Bush administration. Earlier, Bush nominated Nebraska Gov. Mike Johanns to be agriculture secretary, and United Nations Ambassador John C. Danforth submitted his resignation.
NEWS
June 8, 2004
HE'S AN Episcopal minister. An 18-year veteran of the Senate. An heir to wealth and privilege widely respected for his independence and integrity. A trouble-shooter for Democratic as well as Republican administrations; he most recently spent two years working to resolve the seemingly intractable conflict in Sudan. John C. Danforth, 67, will need to tap every bit of his accumulated experience, reputation and native talent to succeed at the new task President Bush has assigned him: U.S. ambassador to the United Nations.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Mark Matthews and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 5, 2004
WASHINGTON - President Bush has chosen John C. Danforth, a former three-term Republican senator from Missouri with a reputation as a skilled mediator, to replace John D. Negroponte as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. The widely respected Danforth, 67, is virtually assured of quick confirmation by the Senate, sparing the administration a prolonged vacancy at the U.S. mission to the United Nations, one of the most important American diplomatic posts in the world. Negroponte will become the first American ambassador to Iraq since the fall of Saddam Hussein.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Mark Matthews and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 5, 2004
WASHINGTON - President Bush has chosen John C. Danforth, a former three-term Republican senator from Missouri with a reputation as a skilled mediator, to replace John D. Negroponte as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. The widely respected Danforth, 67, is virtually assured of quick confirmation by the Senate, sparing the administration a prolonged vacancy at the U.S. mission to the United Nations, one of the most important American diplomatic posts in the world. Negroponte will become the first American ambassador to Iraq since the fall of Saddam Hussein.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 9, 1999
WASHINGTON -- After days of delicate negotiation, Attorney General Janet Reno will announce today that former Sen. John C. Danforth will head an independent inquiry into the FBI's conduct at Waco, Texas, and whether the agency later tried to conceal information about it.Reno, who has acknowledged that her credibility has been damaged by recent revelations, yielded to pressure to grant Danforth broad powers to subpoena evidence that will allow him to conduct...
NEWS
May 7, 2004
On May 5, 2004, BERTHA M. DANFORTH (nee Chiveral), beloved wife of the late Robert S. Danforth, Sr., devoted mother of Margaret Tantses, Kathleen Spittel, Bonne Saum, Robert S. Danforth, Jr., Thomas H. Cordner and Susan E. Cordner. Also survived by many loving grandchildren and great-grandchildren Friends may call on Saturday and Sunday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. at the Mac Nabb Funeral Home, 301 Frederick Rd., Catonsville (at Beltway Exit 13). A graveside service will be held on Tuesday at 10 A.M. at Baltimore National Cemetery
NEWS
July 28, 2000
THE CONSPIRACY theorists won't be satisfied. But for the rest of us, the recently released interim report of special counsel John C. Danforth on the 1993 raid on the Branch Davidian compound in Waco ends questions about federal wrongdoing. Mr. Danforth, the respected former Republican senator from Missouri, was brought in to investigate allegations that federal agents started the fire at the compound in which 80 people died and that a conspiracy ensued to hide that fact. That those agents were not responsible for the deadly incident and, therefore, there was no attempted government cover-up, was stated by Mr. Danforth in the strongest terms last week.
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