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March 22, 1991
It's maybe no surprise that ''Dances With Wolves'' is our readers' choice for Best Picture of 1990. Kevin Costner's epic western drew 55 percent of the votes (56 out of 101) of Evening Sun readers and other callers to Lou Cedrone's SUNDIAL Oscar Line. The 63rd Academy Awards will be broadcast Monday night at 9 on ABC.The wildly successful ''Ghost'' was a distant second with 20 percent, followed by the also-rans ''Awakenings'' (11 percent), ''GoodFellas'' (9 percent) and ''Godfather III'' (5 percent)
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By Terry Lawson and Terry Lawson,KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | May 29, 2003
Time has not been good to Kevin Costner, who should be about ready for that Vanity Fair profile in which he talks about how it all slipped away but he's ready to take it back. Still, even the turgid debacle that was his second official film as a director, The Postman, can't take away from Dances With Wolves. The story of a cavalry officer who is befriended by a wolf and then by a tribe of Lakota Indians receives a substantial two-DVD Special Edition upgrade. It's the first DVD release of the four-hour version previously available only on laser disc, which means those who were spellbound by it will be bound longer and those who thought the three-hour version was an hour too long will be twice as convinced.
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By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | November 21, 1990
DANCES WITH Wolves'' runs a fraction more than three hours but justifies its running time. There are moments, though. There is one when a commanding officer commits suicide, and you're not sure why. There is another, at the beginning of the film, when the lead character's behavior seems curious more than desperate.At another point, the new film plays like ''Blazing Saddles,'' but these are the exceptions. For the most part, ''Dances With Wolves'' is tight and interesting throughout.Kevin Costner stars.
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By Daniel Howard Cerone and Daniel Howard Cerone,Los Angeles Times | March 10, 1995
The word "epic" just seems to follow Kevin Costner around these days.Mr. Costner, who won an Academy Award in 1991 for directing the sprawling, three-hour "Dances With Wolves," will direct, star in and produce "The Kentucky Cycle," a six-hour HBO miniseries spanning 200 years of American history. The project was adapted by Robert Schenkkan from his own Pulitzer Prize-winning play, co-produced in 1992 by the Mark Taper Forum."In a business of superlatives, this is an amazing day in the history of television," said Bob Cooper, senior vice president of HBO Pictures, who signed off on Mr. Costner's deal Wednesday morning.
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By Andy Wickstrom and Andy Wickstrom,Knight-Ridder | August 28, 1991
"Dances With Wolves," last year's winner of the Academy Award for best picture, arrives in video stores today attended by all the excitement befitting a smash release.Besides boasting an Oscar pedigree (seven awards, including best direction and cinematography), Kevin Costner's western epic picks up a new laurel in the transition to video. Its shipment of 649,000 copies to stores in the United States and Canada makes it the biggest-selling video of all time in its price category.(Price category is an important distinction.
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By Lou Cedrone | November 28, 1990
Robert Pastorelli plays Timmons, traveling companion to Kevin Costner in ''Dances With Wolves.'' You may have trouble recognizing him. He looks nothing like the character he plays on ''Murphy Brown,'' the television series starring Candice Bergen.He plays Elvin Barnecky, ever-present handyman to Bergen in the series, so it is only natural to assume that he is considering a spinoff featuring the same character.''No, I don't think so,'' said Pastorelli. ''I don't think I want to star in a series.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Josh Mooney and Josh Mooney,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | August 30, 1991
DANCES WITH WOLVESOrion Home Video No Retail Price ListedHeartthrob Kevin Costner's directorial debut was so ambitious as to court folly: a Western (the genre is perennially considered moribund), set in the 1860s, and with a running time of three hours -- an epic scope in an era when movies over 90 minutes are routinely criticized as being too long for what's in them. The film made zillions, picked up seven Oscars, and was, in addition, the feel-good movie of the year.Regardless of your current feelings about Mr. Costner -- "Robin Hood" was a bore; Mr. Costner is just plain overexposed -- watching this film on video will remind you why it did so well.
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By John Madson and John Madson,Universal Press Syndicate | April 7, 1991
The motion picture "Dances With Wolves" opens with a Civil War battle sequence filmed in Georgia, but the rest of the movie's locales are in western South Dakota.From the Southern battlefield the action moves to the bleak Dakota Territory outpost to which a young cavalry lieutenant (Kevin Costner) has been assigned -- a ramshackle corral and sod hut built by location crews on a ranch northeast of Rapid City not far from the airport. (Months later, an assessor making her rounds saw a distant building where none had been before.
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By Richard C. Morais and Richard C. Morais,New York Times | December 26, 1990
LONDON -- "It was very much like the Hardy Boys or something," says Kevin Costner of his new film. "It was like, 'Hey, let's do a show.'""Dances With Wolves," a three-hour epic about the frontier West, is not only directed by the 35-year-old Costner; he is also the star and co-producer. As he describes how the movie came about, Costner switches on the easygoing charm that makes him so watchable on screen."I wasn't looking for this particular subject, for this particular movie. It was just there," he says, leaning back in a canvas chair on location outside London, where he is starring as Robin Hood in "Prince of Thieves," now being filmed.
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By Randi Henderson | November 21, 1990
The Indians are the good guys and the white men the bad guys in the new movie "Dances With Wolves." And that's just fine with Edward and James Simermeyer, whose mother is a Navajo and father is from the Coharie tribe.thought the movie was awesome, it had everything," said James, 12, who is in the seventh grade at Friends School. "I liked it because it got rid of all the stereotypes about Indians.""It was pretty accurate. It really makes me feel upset about the way the white men treated the Indians," added his brother Edward, 15, a 10th-grader at Friends."
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By Anne Z. Cooke and Steve Haggerty and Anne Z. Cooke and Steve Haggerty,Contributing Writers | July 5, 1992
The tom-toms are stilled and the Sioux ghost dancers gone from Stronghold Rock in the Badlands of southwest South Dakota.Anguished chants floating skyward, invoking the great buffalo spirits and foretelling the rebirth of the once-mighty Sioux Nation, have been silent for more than a century.But another ancient prophecy will be soon be fulfilled, when Chief Crazy Horse returns to lead his people back to the ways of dignity and self-reliance.The spirit of the great chief has been in the Black Hills west of Rapid City all along, of course, on the mountain known as the Crazy Horse Memorial.
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By New York Times News Service | May 8, 1992
This month, video dealers face a proposition they don't like much: Putting up with the very long movie.Wednesday, MCA/Universal released Hector Babenco's "At Play in the Fields of the Lord," which runs 3 hours, 6 minutes, and on May 20 will come Warner's "JFK," which lasts 3 hours, 8 minutes.Each movie is on two cassettes, and that makes store owners nervous. Double-cassette films can turn off customers, retailers say."One cassette is a prime-time sitting," said Gary Messenger, owner of the eight-store North American Video chain, which is based in Durham, N.C. "Two cassettes mean two sittings to many people.
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | March 28, 1992
Remorse for collective wrongs may be admirable, but it can also seem self-indulgent -- which is the primary problem with "The Last of His Tribe," a handsomely produced period movie premiering at 8 tonight on HBO.Jon Voight plays a turn-of-the-century anthropologist studying an Indian who is apparently the only survivor of his tribe. The Yahi were wiped out by white men, and native actor Graham Greene ("Dances With Wolves") portrays the Indian. A number of Indian extras were used in the cast, too.The film's story supposedly springs from the true experience of a prominent figure in the study of Indian tribes, University of California professor Alfred Kroeber, who worked with an Indian named "Ishi" (for "man" in his native tongue)
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By Bob Strauss and Bob Strauss,Los Angeles Daily News | December 31, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- Every movie year has its trends, and 1991 was no different. But if there was one overriding theme to the dozen months just past, it was irony.Not just because actresses, that long-exploited segment of the industry working class, took up arms on screen ("Silence of the Lambs," "Thelma & Louise," "Terminator 2").Nor was it because their male counterparts, who have been feeding high on the macho-movie hog for a decade, suddenly seemed to have mass sensitivity attacks ("Regarding Henry," "The Fisher King," "Terminator 2")
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 22, 1991
"Black Robe" is "Dances With Wolves" through a glass darkly.It's a wonderful movie, as was "Dances" -- but it's 'N wonderful in a different way."Dances" was indeed a dance -- a minuet with a romantic vision of a Native American people who were eco-correct and oh-so-wonderfully noble and altruistic. It may have been dreadful anthropology, but it was a platform from which to critique the hallowed myth of manifest destiny and white superiority. And, like any fairy tale, it childishly cleaved the world into moral opposites: good (red)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Josh Mooney and Josh Mooney,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | August 30, 1991
DANCES WITH WOLVESOrion Home Video No Retail Price ListedHeartthrob Kevin Costner's directorial debut was so ambitious as to court folly: a Western (the genre is perennially considered moribund), set in the 1860s, and with a running time of three hours -- an epic scope in an era when movies over 90 minutes are routinely criticized as being too long for what's in them. The film made zillions, picked up seven Oscars, and was, in addition, the feel-good movie of the year.Regardless of your current feelings about Mr. Costner -- "Robin Hood" was a bore; Mr. Costner is just plain overexposed -- watching this film on video will remind you why it did so well.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 18, 1990
In Sunday's editions of The Sun, an article on Kevin Costner gave an incorrect filming location for "Dances With Wolves." The movie was made in South Dakota.Washington-- His Royal Cuddlyness, the most adorable man in America, comes bounding into the room. When he smiles, you can hear hearts stop beating, breaths being intaken and expelled. The Kevin teeth are dazzlers, and the way his blue eyes light to aquamarine when he smiles and the way he gets those crinkly little deltas of lines like a flint arrowhead next to them on his temples, why, it's something way beyond adorable.
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By Anne Z. Cooke and Steve Haggerty and Anne Z. Cooke and Steve Haggerty,Contributing Writers | July 5, 1992
The tom-toms are stilled and the Sioux ghost dancers gone from Stronghold Rock in the Badlands of southwest South Dakota.Anguished chants floating skyward, invoking the great buffalo spirits and foretelling the rebirth of the once-mighty Sioux Nation, have been silent for more than a century.But another ancient prophecy will be soon be fulfilled, when Chief Crazy Horse returns to lead his people back to the ways of dignity and self-reliance.The spirit of the great chief has been in the Black Hills west of Rapid City all along, of course, on the mountain known as the Crazy Horse Memorial.
FEATURES
By Andy Wickstrom and Andy Wickstrom,Knight-Ridder | August 28, 1991
"Dances With Wolves," last year's winner of the Academy Award for best picture, arrives in video stores today attended by all the excitement befitting a smash release.Besides boasting an Oscar pedigree (seven awards, including best direction and cinematography), Kevin Costner's western epic picks up a new laurel in the transition to video. Its shipment of 649,000 copies to stores in the United States and Canada makes it the biggest-selling video of all time in its price category.(Price category is an important distinction.
FEATURES
By Dennis Hunt and Dennis Hunt,Los Angeles Times | August 9, 1991
These days video retailers are grumbling about business sagging in the first half of the year. For most the best hope for a profitable '91 hinges on a bang-up fall quarter.That means the release -- from late August on -- of the kind of movies that will lure legions of customers. "Ghost" was the only big draw in the first half of the year. Without it, business for most retailers would have been woeful.The retailers are in luck. The fall lineup looks strong now and may get stronger.The titles include "Home Alone," "Terminator 2," "The Godfather Part III," "Fantasia," "The Silence of the Lambs" and "Dances With Wolves."
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