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By Kim Hart and Kim Hart,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2005
In Columbia, 15 youngsters clicked their heels to the quick tempo of a traditional Irish jig. In Baltimore, three generations of African-American dancers moved rhythmically to the pounding of drums, singing lyrics in West African dialects. And in Laurel, six women in sleek black dresses whirled in a series of exotic Spanish Flamenco steps. All were preparing for performances in the 2005-2006 arts season - the Baltimore Irish Festival in September, an African dance concert at Center Stage in October and Maryland Dance Council's Annapolis Gala Concert in November.
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EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | April 2, 2012
Most of Lutherville resident Brooke Kuhl-McClelland's day is spent in a dance studio in Howard County. When this veteran dance teacher's students give a public performance, she prefers to be off to the side - watching as her students bask in the applause. But last month the spotlight and applause were for this teacher, who instructs dance students at Hammond High School. Kuhl-McClelland's career earned her one of the four Howie Awards, handed out at the 15th annual "Celebration of the Arts in Howard County" on March 24 in the Peter and Elizabeth Horowitz Visual and Performing Arts Center at Howard Community College.
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NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,special to the sun | March 18, 2007
The teenagers drank punch and munched on snacks until, summoned by the instructor, they sheepishly made their way onto the makeshift dance floor. They formed a circle in the cafeteria at Bel Air High School. Matthew Lipka,18, adjusted his tie as he found an open spot. "I have no idea what to expect," the senior said. But before long, the sound of "Mambo No. 5" pulsated through the cafeteria and the room became a blur of twirling skirts and swaying hips. The teenagers, normally used to hip-hop dancing, or not dancing at all, were swept up in swing fever.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,special to the sun | March 18, 2007
The teenagers drank punch and munched on snacks until, summoned by the instructor, they sheepishly made their way onto the makeshift dance floor. They formed a circle in the cafeteria at Bel Air High School. Matthew Lipka,18, adjusted his tie as he found an open spot. "I have no idea what to expect," the senior said. But before long, the sound of "Mambo No. 5" pulsated through the cafeteria and the room became a blur of twirling skirts and swaying hips. The teenagers, normally used to hip-hop dancing, or not dancing at all, were swept up in swing fever.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1999
Dawn Cooper Barnes, Howard Community College professor and artistic director of the Aurora Dance Company -- considered one of Howard County's premier dance companies -- is in a bit of a hurry.She is constantly on the go, and finding a few minutes to talk to Barnes, 40, is sometimes tricky unless she can schedule it between her many daily appointments, meetings and rehearsals.In addition to her solo dancing career, there are her responsibilities as Aurora's choreographer and her schedule at HCC, where she teaches courses on film, dance, English and mass media.
FEATURES
By J. L. Conklin and J. L. Conklin,Special to The Sun | May 14, 1994
Beware, watching the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater perform can give you a high. The company's stirring performances Thursday of two Baltimore premieres and the traditional Ailey favorite, "Revelations," virtually up-lifted the Mechanic Theatre audience to a standing ovation.The opening-night performance overflowed with outstanding virtuosity and craftsmanship that was coupled with the company's inherent message that dance is good for the soul.Garth Fagan's "Jukebox for Alvin" opened the program of three dances.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.L. Conklin and J.L. Conklin,Contributing Writer | July 3, 1992
The Columbia Festival of the Arts audience attending Eva Anderson's Baltimore Dance Theatre's concert had more than just dance for excitement last night.A false fire alarm at Howard Community College's Smith Theatre broke the concentration of the audience but not of Ms. Anderson's talented company, which continued the opening number despite the persistent buzzer.Ms. Anderson bills her concerts as being in the African-American tradition, incorporating the five elements she says are necessary -- words, music, dance, spirituality and audience participating.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | April 2, 2012
Most of Lutherville resident Brooke Kuhl-McClelland's day is spent in a dance studio in Howard County. When this veteran dance teacher's students give a public performance, she prefers to be off to the side - watching as her students bask in the applause. But last month the spotlight and applause were for this teacher, who instructs dance students at Hammond High School. Kuhl-McClelland's career earned her one of the four Howie Awards, handed out at the 15th annual "Celebration of the Arts in Howard County" on March 24 in the Peter and Elizabeth Horowitz Visual and Performing Arts Center at Howard Community College.
NEWS
By Tawanda W. Johnson and Tawanda W. Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 30, 2003
The thumping beat beckons the dancers to the floor of the Hurt Gymnasium at Morgan State University. On command from Iantha L. Tucker, artistic director and principal choreographer of the university's Modern Dance Ensemble for the past 27 years, arms, legs and hips sway to the jazzy New Orleans-style music. "OK, here we go. Dance, people. Smile," Tucker says, kneeling in front of the 12 dancers, watching their every rehearsal move. Since 1976, Tucker -- a dance historian and associate professor in the health, physical education and recreation department -- has led the school's modern-dance company, drawing the respect and the admiration of students and colleagues.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1999
Dawn Cooper Barnes, Howard Community College professor and artistic director of the Aurora Dance Company -- considered one of Howard County's premier dance companies -- is in a bit of a hurry.She is constantly on the go, moving to her own beat. Finding a few minutes to talk to Barnes, 40, is sometimes tricky unless she can schedule it between her many daily appointments, meetings and rehearsals.In addition to her solo dancing career, there are her responsibilities as Aurora's choreographer and her tight schedule at HCC, where she teaches courses on film, dance, English and mass media.
NEWS
By Kim Hart and Kim Hart,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2005
In Columbia, 15 youngsters clicked their heels to the quick tempo of a traditional Irish jig. In Baltimore, three generations of African-American dancers moved rhythmically to the pounding of drums, singing lyrics in West African dialects. And in Laurel, six women in sleek black dresses whirled in a series of exotic Spanish Flamenco steps. All were preparing for performances in the 2005-2006 arts season - the Baltimore Irish Festival in September, an African dance concert at Center Stage in October and Maryland Dance Council's Annapolis Gala Concert in November.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2005
Sixteen-year-old Anneke Collins has been dancing since she was 9, and has trained in ballet, modern, jazz and other dance styles. But the quick, sharp movements of hip-hop dance were all new to the Columbia resident as she followed professional dancer Ellen Rath on Tuesday through a series of shoulder pops, leg swivels, turns, bounces and pivots. "It makes me laugh at myself," she said. "It's moves our bodies are not used to." Collins and six other local teenage dancers spent three days in intensive workshops this week learning a routine of classical, hip-hop, jazz and b-boy (also called breakdancing)
NEWS
By Tawanda W. Johnson and Tawanda W. Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 30, 2003
The thumping beat beckons the dancers to the floor of the Hurt Gymnasium at Morgan State University. On command from Iantha L. Tucker, artistic director and principal choreographer of the university's Modern Dance Ensemble for the past 27 years, arms, legs and hips sway to the jazzy New Orleans-style music. "OK, here we go. Dance, people. Smile," Tucker says, kneeling in front of the 12 dancers, watching their every rehearsal move. Since 1976, Tucker -- a dance historian and associate professor in the health, physical education and recreation department -- has led the school's modern-dance company, drawing the respect and the admiration of students and colleagues.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 10, 2002
WHEN 8-year-old Shannen O'Neill reaches inside her bulging dance bag, it's like opening Pandora's "shoe" box. The daughter of Peter and Wendy O'Neill of Linstead has become such an expert in so many dance styles - ballet, tap, jazz, lyrical jazz and Irish step - that she regularly wins dance competitions across the United States. "She loves to dance," her mother says. "It's in her blood. She comes alive on stage. I think she's very talented." Shannen started dancing at age 2 and competing when she was 5 years old. Although she's a natural when it comes to dance, the little third-grader spends five hours a week in dance classes, plus private lessons and group rehearsals, all at Dance Explosion in Glen Burnie.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2000
One art form grew up in the Southern Appalachian mountains, evolving from the traditional dances of Irish, Scottish and English settlers. The other came of age in the 1970s in black fraternities and sororities on American college campuses. Step-dancing and stepping, two forms of percussive dance, may have similar names but are far removed from each other by race, culture and generations. Though they previously have had separate audiences - one white, one black - they will share the stage at the Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts in Annapolis tomorrow and Saturday nights.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 27, 2000
The Talent Machine Company's current production of "Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat" is amazing in its high-spirited cast brimming with energy, its fast-paced staging, its brilliant choreography, its fabulous sets, its dazzling costumes and its great sound and lighting. No single performer in this 23-member cast of 12 to 19-year-olds was less than brilliant in a recent performance. This production of "Joseph" along with the Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre's season opener "Jesus Christ Superstar," are this season's standouts.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 27, 2000
The Talent Machine Company's current production of "Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat" is amazing in its high-spirited cast brimming with energy, its fast-paced staging, its brilliant choreography, its fabulous sets, its dazzling costumes and its great sound and lighting. No single performer in this 23-member cast of 12 to 19-year-olds was less than brilliant in a recent performance. This production of "Joseph" along with the Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre's season opener "Jesus Christ Superstar," are this season's standouts.
FEATURES
By J. L. Conklin and J. L. Conklin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 16, 1995
Eva Anderson's Baltimore Dance Theatre is marking its 20th anniversary in a city in which dance companies have a precarious existence. Not only did the concert at the Baltimore Museum of Arts Saturday night attest to Ms. Anderson's perseverance of spirit, but the nearly packed house also confirmed her popularity.The event also served as a ceremony -- as the torch of the company's artistic director was passed from Ms. Anderson to longtime company member Dr. Charles Carter.Featured on this program was Ms. Anderson's "Beginnings," which premiered last spring, plus excerpts from several of her other works.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1999
But for the baggy T-shirts and Lycra leotards, this could have been Pierre Duport's Baltimore dance studio of two centuries ago. The dozen dancers -- bodies perfectly erect, arms precisely held -- were carving the elaborate patterns of early 19th-century social dance around the Todd Studio at Goucher College early this week. These are the members of Choregraphie Antique, a decade-old combination of historical research project and performance troupe that reconstructs dances of the past.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1999
Dawn Cooper Barnes, Howard Community College professor and artistic director of the Aurora Dance Company -- considered one of Howard County's premier dance companies -- is in a bit of a hurry.She is constantly on the go, moving to her own beat. Finding a few minutes to talk to Barnes, 40, is sometimes tricky unless she can schedule it between her many daily appointments, meetings and rehearsals.In addition to her solo dancing career, there are her responsibilities as Aurora's choreographer and her tight schedule at HCC, where she teaches courses on film, dance, English and mass media.
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