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March 8, 2012
Theater and dance students in Prince George's County public schools can attend workshops in March that also offer the opportunity to perform. The second annual Theatre Arts Festival for county drama students will be held Tuesday, March 27 at 7 p.m. at the Bowie Center for the Performing Arts, 15200 Annapolis Road, Bowie. Drama students from Prince George's County public middle schools and high schools will participate in monologue competitions and workshops with professional artists, and the day will end with student performances at 6 p.m. The 15th annual Dance Showcase, on Thursday, March 29 at Dr. Henry A. Wise, Jr. High School, 12650 Brooke Lane, Upper Marlboro, provides county dance students an opportunity to work with professional choreographers and receive instruction in various dance genres.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2012
Adelfeus Cole sees a lot of kids who are unmotivated in the classroom. Tyana Palmer wants to know why the cafeteria can't serve students more vegetarian meals. And Kyle Rivers wonders whether Baltimore County will change its traditional school calendar. The high school students questioned Superintendent Dallas Dance about those issues Wednesday at his first of two planned "student town hall meetings. " Throughout the event, hands shot up from the crowd of about 70 students from a dozen schools gathered at Chesapeake High in Essex.
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NEWS
By Debra Taylor Young and Debra Taylor Young,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 12, 2002
SIX YOUNG dancers from Carroll County Dance Center in Sykesville are going to a New York dance studio to perform Sunday. They will be accompanied by family and friends who are eager to witness a performance that is the culmination of years of dance lessons and hours of rehearsal. Dedicated parents and dance instructors have played a key role in their success. The six 11- and 12-year-old girls - Becca Conkling, Lisa Feroli, Megan Franey, Stephanie Hettchen, Catherine Whiteford and Brittani Williams - share a devotion to dance that began as early as age 3. They take tap, ballet and jazz classes for up to 12 hours a week.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | April 2, 2012
Most of Lutherville resident Brooke Kuhl-McClelland's day is spent in a dance studio in Howard County. When this veteran dance teacher's students give a public performance, she prefers to be off to the side - watching as her students bask in the applause. But last month the spotlight and applause were for this teacher, who instructs dance students at Hammond High School. Kuhl-McClelland's career earned her one of the four Howie Awards, handed out at the 15th annual "Celebration of the Arts in Howard County" on March 24 in the Peter and Elizabeth Horowitz Visual and Performing Arts Center at Howard Community College.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,Contributing Writer | May 20, 1994
Medora Lynn's dance students will offer their blood, sweat and tears so others won't have to.About 200 students from The Ballet Slipper dance studio will participate in recitals today, tomorrow and Sunday at Westminster High School to benefit the Carroll County Chapter of the American Red Cross.Ms. Lynn, who owns the Westminster dance studio, has organized the benefit program every other year since 1968.She choreographs the dances and selects the music and costumes. The Red Cross is a special organization to her."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 8, 2005
On a warm afternoon at the end of the first week of school, 25 dance students executed perfectly synchronized leaps across the sunlit studio at the Baltimore School for the Arts. In dance lingo, they were performing grand jetes. But it didn't take a leap of the imagination to see them as a graceful herd of gazelles in The Lion King. The comparison came to mind because the students were attending a master class taught by Rachel Tucker, a 1986 School for the Arts graduate and dance supervisor of the touring production of The Lion King that ended its run at the Hippodrome Theatre on Sunday.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | October 18, 1992
Performances by Peabody Institute dance students and members of the Baltimore Actors' Theatre will mark today's opening of Arts Unlimited for Literacy, a new arts and crafts gallery in Towson. A project of the Greater Baltimore Cultural Arts Center, the non-profit gallery will show work by more than 100 local artists. Twenty-five percent of the sales will benefit Baltimore County Literacy Works. The ribbon-cutting ceremony and entertainment begins at 1:30 p.m. today. The gallery, located in the Mercantile-Towson building, 409 Washington Ave., open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | April 2, 2012
Most of Lutherville resident Brooke Kuhl-McClelland's day is spent in a dance studio in Howard County. When this veteran dance teacher's students give a public performance, she prefers to be off to the side - watching as her students bask in the applause. But last month the spotlight and applause were for this teacher, who instructs dance students at Hammond High School. Kuhl-McClelland's career earned her one of the four Howie Awards, handed out at the 15th annual "Celebration of the Arts in Howard County" on March 24 in the Peter and Elizabeth Horowitz Visual and Performing Arts Center at Howard Community College.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | April 8, 1993
The dates of two Morgan State University dance performances were listed incorrectly in yesterday's Today section. The Alvin Ailey Repertory Ensemble will perform 8:15 to night in the Murphy Fine Arts Center at Morgan State University. The student showcase will take place tomorrow at the same location. Call (410) 319-3463 or (410) 319-3080.The Sun regrets the errors.With the exception of major figures like Alvin Ailey and Katherine Dunham, African-Americans' contribution to American dance has been all but ignored, says Iantha Tucker, a dance historian and choreographer at Morgan State University.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff Writer | December 21, 1992
Using moves that ranged from classical ballet to hip hop, dance students at Glen Burnie High School got the chance to learn at the feet of a professional last week."
EXPLORE
March 8, 2012
Theater and dance students in Prince George's County public schools can attend workshops in March that also offer the opportunity to perform. The second annual Theatre Arts Festival for county drama students will be held Tuesday, March 27 at 7 p.m. at the Bowie Center for the Performing Arts, 15200 Annapolis Road, Bowie. Drama students from Prince George's County public middle schools and high schools will participate in monologue competitions and workshops with professional artists, and the day will end with student performances at 6 p.m. The 15th annual Dance Showcase, on Thursday, March 29 at Dr. Henry A. Wise, Jr. High School, 12650 Brooke Lane, Upper Marlboro, provides county dance students an opportunity to work with professional choreographers and receive instruction in various dance genres.
NEWS
July 22, 2011
Workshops •The Edward Stewart Memorial Scholarship Fund presents a benefit dance workshop from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 19-20 at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts, 801 Chase St. in Annapolis. Workshop is for dance students between the ages of 13 and 18.. Ballet and variation classes will be taught by Dima Malikov and Ninel Cherevko from M&C Dance. Modern classes will be taught by Jaime Lawton Vitollo. Classes in Pilates, jazz, anatomy, music and audition techniques are also available.
FEATURES
By Ishita Singh and Ishita Singh,Sun reporter | August 2, 2008
Towson Dance Studio instructor Becki Turner was surprised to meet a solo new pupil in a recent ballroom dance class. Among the engaged couples practicing for their first dance as newlyweds stood a high school student. He had elected to take ballroom dancing as a physical education elective after watching the hit TV show Dancing with the Stars. Turner herself became involved in ballroom dancing after watching the ABC sensation. Though she had always wanted to learn dance, the flashy steps on Dancing persuaded her finally to start.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 8, 2005
On a warm afternoon at the end of the first week of school, 25 dance students executed perfectly synchronized leaps across the sunlit studio at the Baltimore School for the Arts. In dance lingo, they were performing grand jetes. But it didn't take a leap of the imagination to see them as a graceful herd of gazelles in The Lion King. The comparison came to mind because the students were attending a master class taught by Rachel Tucker, a 1986 School for the Arts graduate and dance supervisor of the touring production of The Lion King that ended its run at the Hippodrome Theatre on Sunday.
NEWS
By Artika Rangan and Artika Rangan,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2004
Malinda Zebley has spent the past 12 years of her life dancing. Next month, she will take her hobby further by taking part in Cecil Community College's new performing arts program with a concentration in dance. "This is what I've always loved to do," said Zebley, 18, of Earleville. "I figure, why not go to school for it?" Zebley is one of the first students to enroll in the program, which will be offered for the first time in the fall. Performing arts students will take general course requirements in the fall at the North East campus.
FEATURES
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2004
The dance students glide - and sometimes stumble noisily - across the gray wood floor. Their hair is pinned back in tight little buns, their toes are crammed into pointe shoes. The choreography has brought them center stage, staggered in four lines, with two girls lying on the floor in the middle. Judith Fugate stops the rehearsal. Something is wrong. It is day six, hour four of rehearsals for George Balanchine's ballet Serenade. The dancers - students at the Baltimore School for the Arts - are exhausted.
FEATURES
By J.L. Conklin and J.L. Conklin,Special to The Sun | May 13, 1995
Each semester, dance students at local colleges are given the opportunity to demonstrate their special talents in performance and choreography. The students at the University of Maryland Baltimore County are now presenting their program -- a group of diverse works created by faculty members, guest artists and students.The most enjoyable works were those of the guest artists: an abbreviated "Esplanade" by Paul Taylor, and "Blue Feet" by a Taylor Company alum, Karla Wolfangle.Dancers Shannon Connelly, Victoria Francese, Carrie Hammond, Adrienne McGuire and Yevgen Tseytlin turned in a spirited performance in "Esplanade."
NEWS
By Artika Rangan and Artika Rangan,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2004
Malinda Zebley has spent the past 12 years of her life dancing. Next month, she will take her hobby further by taking part in Cecil Community College's new performing arts program with a concentration in dance. "This is what I've always loved to do," said Zebley, 18, of Earleville. "I figure, why not go to school for it?" Zebley is one of the first students to enroll in the program, which will be offered for the first time in the fall. Performing arts students will take general course requirements in the fall at the North East campus.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2002
It took the irresistible rhythm of the "Cha-Cha Slide" to flood the dance floor at La Fontaine Bleu in East Baltimore. Slinky in shimmery, revealing gowns and impossibly high heels, some 50 party girls hopped to the left, hopped to the right, momentarily released from the challenges of young, disadvantaged motherhood. For one enchanted evening, there were no dirty diapers, housing concerns, money worries, family strife. Instead, it was a night to take part in a ritual that millions of high school students enjoy every spring.
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