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Dance Steps

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NEWS
By BONITA FORMWALT | March 9, 1994
They never believe you, no matter how often you demur. They drag you out on the dance floor, your feeble protests drowned out by the sound of a trombola wheel in full spin.(As a child in the 1960s, I was too busy feeling the music to actually learn how to dance.)Still they continue. Pushing you around the dance floor in some weird version of the polka.(I spent the early 1970s unsuccessfully trying to dance to "American Pie.")Suddenly the rhythm takes over and your arms begin to flail. You catch sight of yourself in a mirror.
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FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | January 15, 2010
"Gold Diggers of 1933," this weekend's entry in the Charles Theatre's blissfully eccentric Saturday revival series, is one of those relics from a bygone era that can't help but win your heart. Director Mervyn LeRoy and, especially, choreographer Busby Berkeley turned on all the charm they could find, employed just about every chorus girl within a 20-mile radius of Hollywood (maybe that's an exaggeration, but not by much) and managed to put out a movie that made the Depression appear exciting and, more important, winnable.
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NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,special to the sun | March 18, 2007
The teenagers drank punch and munched on snacks until, summoned by the instructor, they sheepishly made their way onto the makeshift dance floor. They formed a circle in the cafeteria at Bel Air High School. Matthew Lipka,18, adjusted his tie as he found an open spot. "I have no idea what to expect," the senior said. But before long, the sound of "Mambo No. 5" pulsated through the cafeteria and the room became a blur of twirling skirts and swaying hips. The teenagers, normally used to hip-hop dancing, or not dancing at all, were swept up in swing fever.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | February 20, 2008
A little more than a month ago, it didn't look as if Maryland's invitation to the Big Dance would be coming in the mail. A start that included two losses in the Atlantic Coast Conference and nonconference defeats to American and Ohio had NIT written all over it - at best. But since losing to Virginia Tech by a point in mid-January, Gary Williams' guys have reeled off seven wins in their past nine games, including that shocker at North Carolina. And the only two losses have been to Duke.
NEWS
By Diane B. Mikulis and Diane B. Mikulis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 2, 1999
SEVENTEEN PAIRS of small feet stepped, jumped and danced across the floor of the dance studio to the soundtrack from "Space Jam." The first-grade girls glanced at themselves in the mirror and giggled, but mostly their eyes were on instructor Jaclyn White.Clad in shorts, T-shirts and socks or tights, the 6- and 7-year-olds from Brownie troops 654 and 1549, based at Bushy Park Elementary School, were working out at the Triumph Health and Fitness Center last month to earn a Dancercize "try-it" badge.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | June 28, 2001
Kids invited to bug out at Pratt's central branch Bugs: They're ugly and they bite. And, according to Selma Levi, they also do the Charleston. Levi will teach kids the "Ugly Bug Ball" dance steps (a. k. a. the Charleston) if time allows Tuesday afternoon during the debut of the Enoch Pratt Central Branch Library's July storytelling series. She's kicking the program off with a theme that matches the "Buggy About Reading" campaign taking place this summer at many area libraries. The presentation will be about bugs - all kinds of bugs, Levi says.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Staff Writer | November 10, 1992
GREENSBORO, N.C. -- As with nearly everything else in life, there are two ways to view the NCAA's mandate that the start of basketball practice be moved this year from the customary Oct. 15 to Nov. 1.If you're a coach, it's terrible.If you're a player, however, the extra 16 days without practices can be a time to focus on studies, get into condition for the season at hand, or just do nothing.Reactions seemed to fall along those lines Sunday during Operation Basketball, the annual Atlantic Coast Conference preseason media briefing.
NEWS
May 27, 1993
WHAT a difference 30 years can make, as illustrated by a recent Miami Herald story comparing high school proms of 1963 and 1993. Some of the big differences, compiled by Herald reporter Liz Doup:* Transportation -- In 1963, Dad's Ford, Chevy or Plymouth. Sometimes with Mom at the wheel. The cost was gas money. In 1993, six to 12-passenger limos in black or white. Rental cars ranging from the black Lexus to the white Mitsubishi Diamante. Also, "baby" Cadillacs and Lincoln Town Cars in black or white.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 26, 2002
WHEN THE CLOSING bell rings at Crofton Middle School, more than 100 children ignore the school buses and the sidewalks leading home. They stay after school for hours to practice dance steps, learn their lines and prepare for next week's production of 42nd Street. This is the fifth year that Crofton Middle School parents and children have produced a spring musical. The process began in the fall when the youngsters auditioned for parts on the stage and in the ensembles. Valerie Gerheiser, one of the show's mother-producers, reports that this year's group of pupils is the largest yet. She is impressed by the enthusiasm, hard work and talent the youngsters have brought to the project.
NEWS
By Peg Adamarczyk and Peg Adamarczyk,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 3, 1997
KEEPING FIT is never easy, especially once you've hit the big 40. Body parts don't move so easily, or the ones that do move hurt. You know you need to exercise, but where and with whom? Out-of-shape bodies and delicate egos don't take easily to aerobics and spandex.A program from the county Recreation and Parks Department -- Sweatpants & Dance -- may be just what you're looking for. Class is held from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Mondays and Wednesdays at George Fox Middle School on Outing Avenue.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dana Kinker and Dana Kinker,Sun reporter | July 12, 2007
Janette Sullivan has dedicated her life to teaching people of all ages how to "twirl with grace" in her ballet classes, and three years ago, she broadened her influence to encompass all types of aspiring young dancers, regardless of their training background, with the Westminster International Dance Festival. "I found inspiration from spending many summers as a youth attending dance camps around the country," Sullivan said. "Those camps really strengthened my dance skills, and I knew there were no similar camps in the Westminster area."
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 30, 2007
As Josh Groban's "So She Dances" played, Vickie Bath and her dance instructor, Gabe Gamboa, swirled across the wood floor, sometimes forward, sometimes backward, every step silken-smooth. Bath kicked one blue-jeans-clad leg high in the air, then stopped and watched Gamboa demonstrate a step. "One, two three. One, two, cross. I know," she said, and the two whirled off again. Bath, 56, has been an Arthur Murray pupil with Gamboa for about seven years, she said. Until recently, the Clarksville resident traveled to Silver Spring for instruction.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,special to the sun | March 18, 2007
The teenagers drank punch and munched on snacks until, summoned by the instructor, they sheepishly made their way onto the makeshift dance floor. They formed a circle in the cafeteria at Bel Air High School. Matthew Lipka,18, adjusted his tie as he found an open spot. "I have no idea what to expect," the senior said. But before long, the sound of "Mambo No. 5" pulsated through the cafeteria and the room became a blur of twirling skirts and swaying hips. The teenagers, normally used to hip-hop dancing, or not dancing at all, were swept up in swing fever.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2004
A couple of miles west of downtown, on an untended lot surrounded by dilapidated homes and long-vacant businesses, sits an assortment of paint and brushes. They're the elements of Jay Wolf Schlossberg-Cohen's hypothesis: Art can save a neighborhood. Some might scoff that painting a mural on the side of a building in West Baltimore's Midtown-Edmondson neighborhood is naive -- that bright colors won't stop the entrenched drug trade or end the poverty. But idealistic is how Cohen prefers to see it, a lopsided fight worth fighting.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 26, 2002
WHEN THE CLOSING bell rings at Crofton Middle School, more than 100 children ignore the school buses and the sidewalks leading home. They stay after school for hours to practice dance steps, learn their lines and prepare for next week's production of 42nd Street. This is the fifth year that Crofton Middle School parents and children have produced a spring musical. The process began in the fall when the youngsters auditioned for parts on the stage and in the ensembles. Valerie Gerheiser, one of the show's mother-producers, reports that this year's group of pupils is the largest yet. She is impressed by the enthusiasm, hard work and talent the youngsters have brought to the project.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | June 28, 2001
Kids invited to bug out at Pratt's central branch Bugs: They're ugly and they bite. And, according to Selma Levi, they also do the Charleston. Levi will teach kids the "Ugly Bug Ball" dance steps (a. k. a. the Charleston) if time allows Tuesday afternoon during the debut of the Enoch Pratt Central Branch Library's July storytelling series. She's kicking the program off with a theme that matches the "Buggy About Reading" campaign taking place this summer at many area libraries. The presentation will be about bugs - all kinds of bugs, Levi says.
FEATURES
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Evening Sun Staff | August 1, 1991
ARMS twist and twirl around bodies, slender fingers curl around young, bright faces as they Vogue in imitation of Madonna, the pop queen whose song blares in the background of this rehearsal.It's the week of the Afram festival, and the half-dozen or so girls who'll be performing are stepping over each other's toes, forgetting places and movements, crunched up together and looking around for guidance. It's the small rehearsal space in Johnston Square Youth Development Center at Ensor and Chase streets that cramps their style.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,Sun Staff Writer | August 25, 1995
Grab your partner. . . . Oops. Wrong dance. This is country-western line dancing -- sort of the electric slide to the latest country music sounds."The great thing about line dancing is you can come in here without a partner," said Savage resident Roger Tillman, dance instructor for Randy's California Inn in North Laurel. "First of all, it gets you out of the house. And secondly, it's great exercise -- like an aerobic workout."Five days a week, Mr. Tillman cooks up dance steps and serves dozens of amateur dancers with free lessons at the restaurant and bar. They pack the floor, toe-to-toe, stepping and strutting in their cowboy hats and boots (the western paraphernalia is optional)
NEWS
By Diane B. Mikulis and Diane B. Mikulis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 2, 1999
SEVENTEEN PAIRS of small feet stepped, jumped and danced across the floor of the dance studio to the soundtrack from "Space Jam." The first-grade girls glanced at themselves in the mirror and giggled, but mostly their eyes were on instructor Jaclyn White.Clad in shorts, T-shirts and socks or tights, the 6- and 7-year-olds from Brownie troops 654 and 1549, based at Bushy Park Elementary School, were working out at the Triumph Health and Fitness Center last month to earn a Dancercize "try-it" badge.
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