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NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | November 28, 1996
It's been more than two years since the residents of Abell have been able to sleep in peace, as rowdy patrons of the nearby New 32nd Street Plaza nightclub cruised the streets, brawled and waged gun fights.But now they have a fighting chance for quiet.Yesterday the city's Department of Housing and Community Development issued a zoning violation notice ordering the club in the 400 block of E. 32nd St. to shut down because it lacks an occupancy permit for a dance hall.The order came after a shooting Sunday night near the club, when two people were wounded, according to police.
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FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2005
No sooner did Shirley Duncan complete a lengthy stint of hand dancing than her old friend Reggie Goodman asked to be the next man to escort her back to the dance floor. The woman credited with helping revive this once popular pastime in the Baltimore area obliges, and the two 57-year-olds step and spin and saunter with a grace and dexterity that upstages the thirtysomethings at Sista's Place in Randallstown. "It brings people of all walks of life together," Duncan said, "whether you're the garbage man, the firefighter, doctor or lawyer."
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BUSINESS
By DeWitt Bliss and DeWitt Bliss,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 6, 1996
More than 40 years ago, Charles and Yolanda Foehrkolb had their wedding reception in the Breezy Point Beach dance hall.Now they live in it.The beach, owned by Mr. Foehrkolb's family, closed about 12 years ago, roughly the same time that he retired as a furnace feeder at Eastern Stainless Steel Co.But it had long been a home away from home. The couple and their children formerly lived on the park grounds during the season and in Highlandtown the rest of the year.Foehrkolb's father and an uncle bought the property in 1929 for duck hunting, but soon afterward they began clearing the grounds for the park and sandy beach that would accommodate as many as 3,000 people.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Alexandra Fenwick and Alexandra Fenwick,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2004
Every Wednesday night at 8, Lovely Lane Church is filled to bursting with the sound of stomping, clapping, laughing, banjo-plucking and guitar-strumming. A peek into the church's recreation hall reveals a brigade of dock shoes, jazz shoes, sneakers and even bowling shoes dancing their way across a blond hardwood floor to the commands of a caller urging their wearers to form patterns like a "right hand star" in time with the live band on stage. The scene is dizzying; the fiddler is going a mile a minute, the women's colorful skirts flare as they whirl around the room, and the men's feet don't seem to stop.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | April 13, 1999
Three New York men were arrested and charged with opening fire and wounding five people early yesterday morning in a Southeast Baltimore dance hall packed with 450 patrons who came for a fashion show and dance.Police said one of the suspects might be a member of the New York-based rap group Pitched Black, which had been performing. The three suspects were arrested in a 1999 Mercedes-Benz in which police said they found two semiautomatic handguns.None of the victims was seriously wounded in the shooting, which occurred at 1 a.m. yesterday at Sher-Wes Gardens, a former bingo hall in the 1700 block of Dundalk Ave.All were released from area hospitals by yesterday afternoon.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | June 29, 1996
The lights dim. The band cuts loose. Couples surge toward the dance floor.It's polka time at Blob's Park.The family-run Jessup dance hall with the 2,000-square-foot parquet dance floor and a house band that knows its stuff packs them in every weekend: the young, the old, the graceful, the toe-stompers."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Alexandra Fenwick and Alexandra Fenwick,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2004
Every Wednesday night at 8, Lovely Lane Church is filled to bursting with the sound of stomping, clapping, laughing, banjo-plucking and guitar-strumming. A peek into the church's recreation hall reveals a brigade of dock shoes, jazz shoes, sneakers and even bowling shoes dancing their way across a blond hardwood floor to the commands of a caller urging their wearers to form patterns like a "right hand star" in time with the live band on stage. The scene is dizzying; the fiddler is going a mile a minute, the women's colorful skirts flare as they whirl around the room, and the men's feet don't seem to stop.
FEATURES
By Pat van den Beemt | November 25, 1990
The joint was jumpin' on a recent Saturday night as 200 people twirled, spun, jitterbugged and did the Lindy hop at the Knights of Columbus Hall in Baltimore.The dancers, who switched partners as often as the band changed big band tunes, were breathless and exhilarated.Swing dancing is back and drawing in people too young to remember the dances' beginnings."There's a lot of theories, but I think swing dancing is popular now because there's been a cultural revolution," says Leslie Coombs, founder of Swing Baltimore, a group that holds dances the second Saturday of each month.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2005
No sooner did Shirley Duncan complete a lengthy stint of hand dancing than her old friend Reggie Goodman asked to be the next man to escort her back to the dance floor. The woman credited with helping revive this once popular pastime in the Baltimore area obliges, and the two 57-year-olds step and spin and saunter with a grace and dexterity that upstages the thirtysomethings at Sista's Place in Randallstown. "It brings people of all walks of life together," Duncan said, "whether you're the garbage man, the firefighter, doctor or lawyer."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | November 13, 1992
HARD TO WET, EASY TO DRYMad Cobra (Columbia 52751)Dance hall reggae has always depended on repetition to make its point, from the clockwork regularity of its clanking, mechanical pulse, to the lilting, singsong cadences of the dance hall MCs. Even so, few performers ever manage to make that repetition seem as totally hypnotic as Mad Cobra does with "Hard to Wet, Easy to Dry." Of course, it helps that he has a first-rate rhythm machine behind him, cranking out a steady stream of near-irresistible grooves.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | April 13, 1999
Three New York men were arrested and charged with opening fire and wounding five people early yesterday morning in a Southeast Baltimore dance hall packed with 450 patrons who came for a fashion show and dance.Police said one of the suspects might be a member of the New York-based rap group Pitched Black, which had been performing. The three suspects were arrested in a 1999 Mercedes-Benz in which police said they found two semiautomatic handguns.None of the victims was seriously wounded in the shooting, which occurred at 1 a.m. yesterday at Sher-Wes Gardens, a former bingo hall in the 1700 block of Dundalk Ave.All were released from area hospitals by yesterday afternoon.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1999
Something funky is happening to Towson's night life.The historic Towson Theatre in the heart of Baltimore County suburbia is reopening tonight as a high-profile concert venue serving a new blend of live music. Whether it's acid jazz, reggae, rock or swing, this old movie house is hoping to become the next "it" place.The event doesn't just signal the theater's transformation from billiards parlor to a concert hall accommodating 850 people. It also marks Towson's latest attempt to attract night life to a troubled commercial area.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | November 28, 1996
It's been more than two years since the residents of Abell have been able to sleep in peace, as rowdy patrons of the nearby New 32nd Street Plaza nightclub cruised the streets, brawled and waged gun fights.But now they have a fighting chance for quiet.Yesterday the city's Department of Housing and Community Development issued a zoning violation notice ordering the club in the 400 block of E. 32nd St. to shut down because it lacks an occupancy permit for a dance hall.The order came after a shooting Sunday night near the club, when two people were wounded, according to police.
BUSINESS
By DeWitt Bliss and DeWitt Bliss,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 6, 1996
More than 40 years ago, Charles and Yolanda Foehrkolb had their wedding reception in the Breezy Point Beach dance hall.Now they live in it.The beach, owned by Mr. Foehrkolb's family, closed about 12 years ago, roughly the same time that he retired as a furnace feeder at Eastern Stainless Steel Co.But it had long been a home away from home. The couple and their children formerly lived on the park grounds during the season and in Highlandtown the rest of the year.Foehrkolb's father and an uncle bought the property in 1929 for duck hunting, but soon afterward they began clearing the grounds for the park and sandy beach that would accommodate as many as 3,000 people.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | June 29, 1996
The lights dim. The band cuts loose. Couples surge toward the dance floor.It's polka time at Blob's Park.The family-run Jessup dance hall with the 2,000-square-foot parquet dance floor and a house band that knows its stuff packs them in every weekend: the young, the old, the graceful, the toe-stompers."
NEWS
By ANN LOLORDO | January 31, 1993
Baton Rouge, La.-- He sits where he always sits at Mulate's, beneath the portrait of a Chittamacha Indian and his igloo-shaped hut. It's rare when Mister Charles isn't at his corner table at "the world's most famous Cajun restaurant," (the superlative is self-imposed) waiting for the band to strike up, "Don't Mess with My Toot Toot!"A thin man with a serious demeanor, dark-framed glasses, a salt and pepper beard and a sprinkle of strawberry age spots across a receding hair line, Mister Charles can be found here most evenings of the week, except when he's in Brunfield, Texas for the Wurstfest.
NEWS
By ANN LOLORDO | January 31, 1993
Baton Rouge, La.-- He sits where he always sits at Mulate's, beneath the portrait of a Chittamacha Indian and his igloo-shaped hut. It's rare when Mister Charles isn't at his corner table at "the world's most famous Cajun restaurant," (the superlative is self-imposed) waiting for the band to strike up, "Don't Mess with My Toot Toot!"A thin man with a serious demeanor, dark-framed glasses, a salt and pepper beard and a sprinkle of strawberry age spots across a receding hair line, Mister Charles can be found here most evenings of the week, except when he's in Brunfield, Texas for the Wurstfest.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1999
Something funky is happening to Towson's night life.The historic Towson Theatre in the heart of Baltimore County suburbia is reopening tonight as a high-profile concert venue serving a new blend of live music. Whether it's acid jazz, reggae, rock or swing, this old movie house is hoping to become the next "it" place.The event doesn't just signal the theater's transformation from billiards parlor to a concert hall accommodating 850 people. It also marks Towson's latest attempt to attract night life to a troubled commercial area.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | November 13, 1992
HARD TO WET, EASY TO DRYMad Cobra (Columbia 52751)Dance hall reggae has always depended on repetition to make its point, from the clockwork regularity of its clanking, mechanical pulse, to the lilting, singsong cadences of the dance hall MCs. Even so, few performers ever manage to make that repetition seem as totally hypnotic as Mad Cobra does with "Hard to Wet, Easy to Dry." Of course, it helps that he has a first-rate rhythm machine behind him, cranking out a steady stream of near-irresistible grooves.
FEATURES
By Pat van den Beemt | November 25, 1990
The joint was jumpin' on a recent Saturday night as 200 people twirled, spun, jitterbugged and did the Lindy hop at the Knights of Columbus Hall in Baltimore.The dancers, who switched partners as often as the band changed big band tunes, were breathless and exhilarated.Swing dancing is back and drawing in people too young to remember the dances' beginnings."There's a lot of theories, but I think swing dancing is popular now because there's been a cultural revolution," says Leslie Coombs, founder of Swing Baltimore, a group that holds dances the second Saturday of each month.
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